News / Middle East

Rouhani Wants Quick Results from Nuclear Talks

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani speaks to journalists during a news conference in New York on September 27, 2013.
Iran's President Hassan Rouhani speaks to journalists during a news conference in New York on September 27, 2013.
Reuters
— New Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said on Friday he wanted talks with major powers on Iran's nuclear program to yield results in a short period of time and that the improved mood in U.S.-Iranian relations could lead to better ties.
 
“The atmosphere (in Iran-U.S. ties) is quite different from the past,” Rouhani told a news conference on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly in New York, a day after the highest- level talks between the United States and Iran in a generation.
 
“Our goal is the shared interest between the two nations. Our goal is resolving problems, our goal is step-by-step creating trust between the governments and peoples,” Rouhani said.
 
The Iranian president, who took office last month, said he hoped nuclear talks with the United States and other powers “will yield, in a short period of time, tangible results.”
 
Rouhani said Iran would present its plan for a resolution of the nuclear issue at talks with the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany (P5+1), scheduled to be held in Geneva on Oct. 15 and 16. The five permanent Security Council members are Britain, China, France, the United States and Russia.
 
“We say explicitly that we will be transparent; we say explicitly that we will not build a bomb,” he said. “Through the P5+1 we want to provide even more assurances.”
 
Rouhani said his government had a full mandate to handle the issue.
 
“I think that any result this government reaches, it will have the support of other powers (power centers) in Iran,” he said. “On the nuclear issue, the government has total discretion.”
 
Iran and the United States held their highest-level official talks since before Iran's 1979 revolution on Thursday when Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met along with the other major powers to address Western suspicions that Iran may be trying to develop atomic weapons. That was followed by a brief bilateral meeting between Zarif and Kerry.
 
The two sides said the tone was positive but they remained cautious about resolving the long-running standoff over Iran's nuclear program.
 
A senior U.S. official said after the meeting that Zarif  had proposed fully implementing an agreement on its nuclear program within a year.
 
Rouhani said earlier this week he would like to see a deal with world powers in three to six months.

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by: Ajax Lessome from: usa
September 30, 2013 8:45 PM
I am all for Constructive dialogue with Iran, but dialogue should be predicated on clear understandings of what the end game should be. In the case of Iran, that end game should be the abandonment of nuclear weapons. If Iran wants nuclear power for peaceful uses, it has to submit to inspection and buy fuel rods and not enrich its own. Iran also needs to clean up its human rights record and halt the barbaric practice of public hangings, as well as reopen dissident news media and release political and religious prisoners. Iran also needs to halt its foreign adventures in supporting terror groups and smuggling arms in places like Syria. Dialogue is great, but it means to be meaningful, otherwise it's like North Korea; a delaying tactic or bargaining chip. Iran has too long a history of saying one thing and doing another and Rouhani is as practiced at it as anyone. -The sooner the west realizes this better


by: corneliusvansant@aol.com from: Florida
September 28, 2013 12:11 AM
Unfortunately Rouhani is not the leader of Iran - the Supreme Ayatollah is. Rouhani's job is to stall, delay and placate our naive and incompetent CIC while uranium centrifuges spin out the fuel for the Islamic Bomb.

Such a bomb, in the hands of a stateless cabal like al Qaeda (the enemy of my enemy etc.) can defeat great nations because they cannot be targeted for retaliation. There is no need for importation, bomber or missile to deliver Kamikaze style by very small watercraft on any shore.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
September 27, 2013 12:49 PM
Maybe our watchword here should be Reza Najafi's advice, "...beforehand not to expect much from the discussions". Essentially, Rouhani has not said Iran is about to yield to world pressure to abandon its nuclear ambition. Rather he wants quick action in lifting sanctions on his country on terms to be dictated by the Iranians what way the nuclear negotiations should go. Rouhani wants the world to agree with him that his nuclear program is for peaceful purpose and so leave him alone to continue activities therefrom.

Constructive engagement with Iran does not mean problem solved, instead it can heighten the problem if Iran succeeds to deceive the negotiators and get away with a nuclear bomb at the end. This tends to be the drift when Mr. Rouhani did not just answer to his country's nuclear ambition but called on Israel to bring its purported nuclear arsenal to international inspectors, wherein if Israel does not accede to that, Iran can give excuse that it decided to pursue nuclear bomb program because Israel did not comply with certain rules, real or imaginary.

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