News / Middle East

Iran Nuclear Talks Move to Third Day

'Substantial,' 'Detailed' Iran Nuclear Talks on Day Twoi
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November 21, 2013 10:12 PM
The European Union spokesman says there were substantive meetings on the second day of a key round of talks on Iran's nuclear program, but there is still no agreement on first steps to curb the program in exchange for an easing of economic sanctions. The talks were continuing Thursday night and are expected to resume Friday. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from Geneva.
Al Pessin
— The latest round of talks on Iran's nuclear program moves to a third day Friday, after a spokesman said there were substantive meetings on Thursday.  Negotiators are seeking agreement on initial steps to curb potential military aspects of the program in exchange for an easing of economic sanctions.

Officials spoke of “detailed” talks and remaining differences on several issues Thursday, leaving the impression of difficulty in the negotiating room, where the European Union's foreign policy chief, Catherine Ashton, and Iran's foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, are leading the delegations.

Ashton's spokesman, Michael Mann, said she was determined to bridge the gaps that prevented agreement at the last round of talks more than a week ago, but no one is guaranteeing success.

“It was a real meaningful, detailed, substantial negotiation trying to drill down into the details of the text to try and narrow the differences that still existed after the last round,” he said.

Iran's deputy foreign minister, Abbas Araqchi, said a solution is within reach, but “major differences” remain..

“We would have a difficult job to make, to bridge between these differences," he said. "I think what we need is goodwill and real willingness and determination to resolve these differences.”
 
The negotiators also need some creative solutions, believed to involve how much relief Iran will get from the international economic sanctions in the first stage, and how much it will restrain its nuclear program while negotiations continue on a long-term agreement. Amid all the talk of bridging gaps, no one is providing specifics.

The long-term goal is to assure the international community that Iran's nuclear program is purely peaceful, as Tehran claims, and eventually to end the sanctions.

At the Center for Security Studies in Zurich, senior researcher Roland Popp says it will not be easy.

He said, “Either the Iranians have to practically forgo everything they invested into their nuclear program so far, or the Western countries have to accept that Iran will have an option, in the future, if it ever decides to build nuclear weapons, to leave the non-proliferation treaty and actually proceed down the path to weaponization, as, for example, North Korea has done.  o it’s very tricky.”

Some analysts are concerned that the two sides will not be able to bridge that gap, even if these first-stage talks succeed.

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Comments
     
by: Change Iran Now from: USA
November 23, 2013 9:57 PM
Because the hard liners sense the US is desperate for a deal, there is no talk of human rights considerations. This is a grave mistake. You just have to look at similar Cold War deals with the Soviets where we always extracted human rights considerations. The UN General Assembly must pass a resolution reiterating its demands that Iran halt violations against its citizenry.


by: Elijah McWary from: Aba,Abia State,Nigeria.
November 21, 2013 12:51 PM
Iran had been sponsorer of terrorism as is being witnessed in the Iran sponsored Boko Haram in Nigeria.Nukes in the hands of terrorists portends an end of the world


by: Debbi K. from: USA
November 21, 2013 11:44 AM
I am a librarian at our state's university and we have many Iranians here... and I begin to believe that the Iranians are obsessed with the US and Israel. Its actually funny to see and hear these idiots... now they are sending us more of their "graduate students" who are nothing but agents of the Mullahs... send them back to Iran..!!! where is Homeland Security...???

In Response

by: Farhad from: Iran
November 22, 2013 5:49 PM
Hi Debbi,
I am an Iranian. I read your text carefully for several times. As you told, you are a librarian. However, your words are far from a person in an academic place. We should not be surrounded by the news which we hear here and there. Iranians are all friendly people. They like the people of the world no matter if they are from USA, France, AUS, or any other where. As you said, you are in an state university. Maybe you need to read the magazines of USA which most of the killed people in USA are killed by the USA people not the people of other countries. I think, we should not mix the positions of the governments with the real positions of the people of countries. Understanding this issue is very important for you as a librarian.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
November 21, 2013 10:50 AM
A substantial nuisance! Substantial mistake is being made in the name of substantial negotiation. No one seems to understand what the hurry is in trying to force Iran back into the comity of nation when it does neither need it nor deserve it. Iran itself means substantial evil. Now substantial negotiations with Iran means substantial self-destruction, substantial regression and retrogression, substantial setback and substantial danger to the world. Rouhani does not sound like magic, but I can’t understand what is enchantment in the hooks out there. What does USA want with Iran? Why do USA, EU, P5+1 continue to grovel before Iran to expose the world to the danger of uranium/plutonium fume catastrophe inherent in Iran’s nuclear enrichment. Without the elimination of enrichment, there is nothing good in the negotiations, much less substantial, except substantial danger it poses to human existence.

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