News / Middle East

Iranians Mark US Embassy Takeover Anniversary

FILE - One of 60 U.S. hostages, blindfolded and with his hands bound, is being displayed to the crowd outside the U.S. Embassy in Tehran by Iranian hostage takers, Nov. 9, 1979.
FILE - One of 60 U.S. hostages, blindfolded and with his hands bound, is being displayed to the crowd outside the U.S. Embassy in Tehran by Iranian hostage takers, Nov. 9, 1979.
VOA News
Tens of thousands of people, many shouting "Death to America," have gathered in Tehran to mark the 1979 takeover of the U.S. embassy following the Islamic Revolution.

Observers say Monday's rally is the largest crowd in years at the annual event on the site of the former U.S. compound.   Hardline conservatives had called for a major showing to protest President Hassan Rouhani's historic outreach to Washington.

A 15-minute telephone conversation after the U.N. general assembly between U.S. President Barack Obama and Mr. Rouhani in September was the first direct contact between the two countries' top leadership in over three decades.  

Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has voiced support for President Rouhani's overtures to the West, but says some of the president's moves were "not appropriate."

Islamist students stormed the U.S. embassy in Tehran 34 years ago, holding 52 hostages for 444 days, rupturing diplomatic relations and provoking decades of mutual hostility.

President Rouhani, who took office in August, has made several gestures toward the U.S. in the hope of easing Western sanctions imposed on Iran for pursuing a controversial nuclear program.

His gestures have drawn deep skepticism from Iranian ultra-conservatives who view the U.S. as an arch-enemy and oppose making concessions on Iran's nuclear activities. Western powers accuse Iran of trying to develop nuclear weapons under cover of a civilian energy program, a charge Tehran denies.

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Comments
     
by: PermReader
November 04, 2013 10:53 AM
Muslims`s feasts: 9/11-horror;Quvait ,Mumbai slaughter, so on...
Muslims mourn:Rommel`s defeat,Israel creation,Bin Laden`s death, so on.


by: Monica from: USA
November 04, 2013 9:37 AM
yeah, Obama geopolitics - cuddling our enemies and spurning our allies - really works...!!! idiot


by: Ramnarayan from: Florida, USA
November 04, 2013 6:55 AM
Shouting death to America is not going to solve any problem. If the Iranians want to be heard, they ought to reflect if other countries strom their embassy around the world how would they feel? Yes, US did not deal right with the Iranians in the past. But, then what about the Iranians? Don't live in the past, look towards the future folks.

In Response

by: one irani from: iran
November 04, 2013 3:14 PM
is not the sound of all of irannian most of us are dis agree with them but as you know there are many peopel that they do not want to being friend with the word irannian peopel like american peopel my dear friend

In Response

by: hojat ahmadian
November 04, 2013 10:17 AM
They are just an tiny extremist group. "Death to America" is not the voice of the Iranian people. we love all of the, We'd love to have a relationship with the world.

Greetings to Iran, Long Live the Life


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
November 04, 2013 6:20 AM
What do recent polls say concerning relations between Iran and the United States? What is the popular opinion on the streets of Tehran and other suburbs of Iran since the new diplomatic initiative? Has anyone sounded opinions, too, at Washington and New York? Since it was the younger generation in 1979 that showed the despicable dislike for USA and have grown to be the elders in Iran today - perhaps forming the core of the hardliners still living in the era's parlance of 'death to USA' - what has history taught them, and what has the US learned?

With the loud voice of 'death to America' still dominating public opinion out there, is Obama justified in seeking closer ties with Tehran at the detriment of relations with Saudi Arabia and Israel? What is the very important factor for seeking a good relationship with Iran other than someone's Islamist hunger and enervation of status quo? Decision makers in USA should be careful not to enter into relationships that have false foundation and will land the country in serious jeopardy in the future. USA is bigger than one man, and nothing in a president should be insidious enough to hoodwink the country into wrong relations of shame and perfidy, as this is wont to being.

The memory of the four lost lives in Libya is too fresh to forget, and the burning of US embassy in Egypt in the wake of the recent uprisings could have been same costly in lives. These are in countries where someone can be held accountable. What about in a country where 60 US citizens were kidnapped with impunity, with the aid of state operatives? What is the guarantee that the Nov. 9, 1979 hostage taking will not repeat itself as soon as another set of American scapegoats have been released to Tehran in the name of diplomatic relations and opening of embassy?

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