News / Middle East

Iraqi Forces, Militants Battle for Refinery

  • Members of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces take their positions during clashes with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Ramadi, Iraq, June 19, 2014.
  • Members of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces take their positions during clashes with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Ramadi, Iraq, June 19, 2014.
  • A general view shows damaged houses after fighting in the city of Ramadi, Iraq, June 19, 2014.
  • A member from the oil police force stands guard at Zubair oilfield in Basra, southeast of Baghdad, June 18, 2014.
  • This June 17, 2014 image taken from video uploaded to a militant social media account shows Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant militants arriving at the oil refinery in Beiji, Iraq.
  • This June 17, 2014 image taken from video uploaded to a militant social media account shows Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant militants arriving at the oil refinery in Beiji, Iraq.
  • This June 17, 2014 image taken from video uploaded to a militant social media account shows Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant militants arriving at the oil refinery in Beiji, Iraq.
  • Iraqi Shi'ite Turkmen families fleeing the violence in Tal Afar arrive in Shangal, a town in Nineveh province, Iraq, June 17, 2014.
  • Mehdi Army fighters loyal to Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr march during training in the holy city of Najaf, Iraq, June 16, 2014.
  • Residents gather at governorate building of Nineveh province after the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant took control in the city of Mosul, Iraq, June 16, 2014.
  • This image posted on a militant website on June 14, 2014 appears to show militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant with captured Iraqi soldiers wearing plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq.
  • This image posted on a militant website on June 14, 2014 appears to show militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant moving captured Iraqi soldiers after taking over a base near Tikrit, Iraq.
Images from Iraq
VOA News
Iraqi government forces battled Sunni rebels for control of the country's biggest refinery on Thursday as Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki waited for a U.S. response to an appeal for airstrikes to beat back the threat to Baghdad.

Sunni militants hung their black banners on watch towers at Iraq's Beiji oil refinery, a witness said Thursday, suggesting the vital facility, situated some 200 km (130 miles) north of the capital near Tikrit, had fallen to the insurgents, the Associated Press reported.

However, a top Iraq security official said the government force protecting the refinery was still inside Thursday and that they were in regular contact with Baghdad, according to the AP.

Iraqi military spokesman Qassem Mohammed Atta insisted during a news conference that government security forces control the entire Beiji refinery, adding that more than 70 “terrorists” were killed as they tried to attack the plant, and that 17 of their vehicles were destroyed in the battle.

Some reports say from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) militants, along with their allies, have also entered the town of Baquba on the Diyala River, 60 kilometers north of the capital.

 
Beiji oil refinery, IraqBeiji oil refinery, Iraq
x
Beiji oil refinery, Iraq
Beiji oil refinery, Iraq
General Atta claimed a number of media organizations were “lying” about recent events, broadcasting false information to “affect the morale of the [Iraqi] public.” Five Iraqi TV stations have reportedly been shut down by the government for alleged infractions.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity, a witness who drove past the sprawling Beiji refinery, which spreads along the Tigris River for miles, said militants manned checkpoints around facility while a huge fire burned in one of its tanks. Troops loyal to the Shi'ite-led government were still inside the refinery fighting insurgents who had stormed the perimeter a day earlier, he said.

Gunships fly over

Helicopter gunships flew over the facility to stop further militant advances, which threaten national energy supplies, one Iraqi official said. The insurgents took over a building just outside the refinery and were using it to fire at government forces, he said.

The army officer in charge of protecting the refinery, Col. Ali al-Qureishi, told state-run Iraqiya television by telephone that the facility remained under his control.

Workers who had been inside the complex said Sunni militants seemed to hold most of the compound in early morning and that security forces were concentrated around the refinery's control room.

The 250-300 remaining staff were evacuated early on Thursday, one of those workers told Reuters by telephone.

The Beiji refinery accounts for just over a quarter of the country's entire refining capacity — all of which goes toward domestic consumption for things such as gasoline, cooking oil and fuel for power stations.

Any lengthy outage at Beiji risks long lines at the gas pump and electricity shortages, adding to the chaos already taking hold in the region. The refinery produces about 300,000 barrels per day.

Meanwhile, residents of the Iraqi capital complained of increasing shortages, rising prices, and deteriorating conditions.

"Water is in short supply and electricity cuts have been increasingly frequent, forcing residents to use generators," said on merchant.

Iraqi security spokesman Sa'ad Ma'an says the government is attempting to put a stop to price gouging, threatening to arrest traders he accused of speculation. He also insisted Baghdad has “enough food for years to come.”

US airstrikes sought

Baghdad has formally requested that Washington launch airstrikes on the advancing militants, but there were no signs Thursday of imminent U.S. military action.

While U.S. President Barack Obama has not fully ruled out the possibility of launching airstrikes, such action is not imminent in part because intelligence agencies have been unable to identify clear targets on the ground, officials said, adding that civilian casualties could further enrage the Sunni minority.

Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, confirmed the U.S. had received a request for air power to stop the militants, but highlighted the uncertain political situation in Iraq.

"The entire enterprise is at risk as long as this political situation is in flux," told a Senate panel Wednesday.

Regional U.S. allies seemed keen to discourage air strikes.

Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan, a NATO ally, said the United States “does not view such attacks positively,” given the risk to civilians — a view some U.S. officials have also expressed.

A Saudi source said that Western powers agreed with Riyadh, the main Sunni power in the region, that what was needed was political change, not outside intervention, to heal sectarian division that has widened under al-Maliki.

Saudi Arabia also dismissed as ludicrous on Thursday an accusation by al-Maliki that the kingdom backed Sunni militants who have seized swaths of northern Iraq.

Speaking to reporters in Jeddah, Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal added that the kingdom had criminalized terrorism, especially that perpetrated by the militant ISIL, and he advised Maliki to follow the policy pursued by the kingdom in eradicating terrorism.

Maliki criticized

The swift advance of fighters led by ISIL has sparked international alarm and the United Nations has warned that the crisis was "life-threatening for Iraq."

Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis have been displaced in the nine days of fighting and an unknown number killed, while dozens of Indians and Turks have been kidnapped.

Washington and other Western capitals are trying to save Iraq as a united country by leaning hard on al-Maliki to reach out to Sunnis, many of whom feel excluded by the Shi'ite parties that have dominated elections since the Sunni Saddam was ousted.

In a televised address on Wednesday, al-Maliki appealed to tribes, a significant force in Sunni areas, to renounce “those who are killers and criminals who represent foreign agendas."

But so far Maliki's government has relied almost entirely on his fellow Shi'ites and volunteers for support, with officials denouncing Sunni political leaders as traitors.

Maliki announced Thursday that the government is offering volunteers $644 per month to fight alongside the country's security forces in "hot areas" battling the insurgency, and that the government will pay non-fighting volunteers who aid security forces $450 per month. He also promised all volunteers will receive an extra food allowance.

Shi'ite militias — some of which have funding and backing from Iran — have mobilized to halt the Sunni advance, as Baghdad's million-strong army, built by the United States at a cost of $25 billion, crumbles.

Some U.S. officials castigated al-Maliki, who is being blamed in Washington for causing Iraq to splinter after discriminating against the minority Sunni community, the French news agency AFP reported.

Vice President Joe Biden drove home the U.S. message that al-Maliki needs to lead all Iraqis, not just Shiites.

He told the Iraqi leader in a telephone call that he must govern in an "inclusive manner, promote stability and unity among Iraq's population, and address the legitimate needs of Iraq's diverse communities," a White House statement said.

 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Gen. Martin Dempsey, beside U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel during defense subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Washington, June 18, 2014.Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Gen. Martin Dempsey, beside U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel during defense subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Washington, June 18, 2014.
x
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Gen. Martin Dempsey, beside U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel during defense subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Washington, June 18, 2014.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Gen. Martin Dempsey, beside U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel during defense subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Washington, June 18, 2014.
Dempsey, too, blamed the Iraqi government for the deepening sectarian mire.

"There is very little that could have been done to overcome the degree to which the government of Iraq had failed its people," Dempsey said.

Former U.S. commander in Iraq David Petraeus also weighed in, warning a conference in London that Washington risked becoming an "air force for Shiite militias" and supporting "one side of what could be a sectarian civil war" if political reconciliation was not agreed.

Despite growing political pressure in Washington for Maliki to quit, Obama has not made such a demand public.

“The Maliki government, candidly, has got to go if you want any reconciliation,” said Dianne Feinstein, one of Obama's fellow Democrats, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Republican senator John McCain urged Obama to “make it make very clear to Maliki that his time is up."

Captured territory

Beiji, 40 km (25 miles) north of Saddam Hussein's home city of Tikrit, lies squarely in territory captured in the past week by the array of armed Sunni groups spearheaded by ISIL, which is seeking a new Islamic caliphate in Iraq and Syria. ISIL considers Iraq's Shi'ite Muslim majority heretics in league with neighboring Shi'ite Iran. The group's advance has only been slowed by a regrouped military, Shi'ite militias and other volunteers.

ISIL, whose leader broke with al-Qaida after accusing the global jihadist movement of being too cautious, has now secured cities and territory in Iraq and Syria, bringing it closer to establishing its own well-armed regional enclave that, Western countries fear, could become a global epicenter for terrorism.

Oil industry

If the Beiji refinery falls, ISIL and its allies will have access to a large supply of fuel to add to the weaponry and economic resources seized in Mosul and across the north.

An oil ministry official said the loss of Beiji would cause shortages in the north, including the autonomous Kurdish area, but that the impact on Baghdad would be limited — at around 20 percent of supplies — since it was served by other refineries.

Some international oil companies have pulled out foreign workers.

The assault on the refinery also has affected global gasoline prices, as the U.S. national average price reached $3.67 per gallon, the highest price for this time of year since 2008, the year gasoline hit its all-time high in America.

The price of benchmark crude for July delivery rose 57 cents Thursday to $106.54 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Ed Yeranian contributed reporting from Cairo. Some information for this report comes from AP and Reuters.

You May Like

Photogallery Americans Celebrate Thanksgiving With Feasts, Festivities

Holiday traditions include turkey dinners, 'turkey trots,' American-style football and New York parade with giant balloons More

Video For Obama, Ferguson Violence is a Personal Issue

With two years left in term, analysts say, president has less to lose by taking conversation on race further More

Video Italian Espresso Expands Into Space

When Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti headed for the ISS, her countrymen worried how she would survive six months drinking only instant coffee More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: TDX from: Global
June 19, 2014 9:39 AM
This is why the separation of religion from government is so important.

In Response

by: John Poole from: Ardmore, PA
June 19, 2014 6:25 PM
I remember a comment by perhaps an Iranian cleric saying decades ago oil was the Devil's poop (he used the S word). It seemed
a clever and succinct appraisal of our pathetic religious arrested development.

In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
June 19, 2014 5:11 PM
THINGS YOU DIDN"T KNOW? -- The US has all the tribal, religious, sexuality, and racial differences, fought over in other foreign countries, but they fight their differences in courts, instead of in combat, don't they?

THINK ABOUT IT? -- To win political elections, the US politicians campaign with all the (different kinds) of American tribes, consisting of gay and lesbian, black, whites and Asians, and Democrats and Republicans, Catholics, Protestants, Jews and those who oppose them, and any other groups of people, who'll get the elected? --- America has different types of tribes, and fight their religious battles in courts of law, where other countries don't? ------- REALLY?

In Response

by: Dave from: Utah
June 19, 2014 1:15 PM
We went for the oil. The terrorists went for the oil.


by: Catherine Matthies from: Florida
June 19, 2014 9:30 AM
Here is where we are the zeroes, elect an incompetent president, let him go to war and imagine we can contain a geographical situation we have no desire to reside in...When you can't enlist enough people willing to endure 110+ temperatures, sandstorms, etc., you fast realize that water is more important to the natural citizens than some black substance we get out of the ground to run systems they will never benefit from. Just what is your first clue?


by: Strellnikov from: BF Egypt
June 19, 2014 9:20 AM
Say goodbye to Iraq, Syria and Jordon. Their borders are not natural, they are not natural countries. Next up - The Grand Caliphate.


by: naksuthin
June 19, 2014 9:09 AM
This is a religious war between Sunnis and Shiites. Does anyone really know what the difference between them are? If not, how does America know which side to take. Iran supports the Shiite...the west hates Iran Terrorists support the ISIS....the west hates terrorists Pick your poison Here's an idea the US has never tried before: WHY DON'T WE DO WHAT CHINA AND RUSSIA ARE DOING........NOTHING

In Response

by: Ahmed Said
June 19, 2014 2:04 PM
the difference between Sunnis and Shiites is fundamental. Sunnis follow the traditions of the prophet Mohammed PBUH and do not believe walaiah (loyalty) which is exclusive for descendant of the Prophet Mohammed PBUH. Rather Sunnis believe that the admiration of anyone who is a descendant of the Prophet is a sign of good faith. Shiites most at least believe in IMAAmeh where by it is ordaned that 12 Imams will exist between the Passing of the Prophet and the Day of Judgement. they believe that those Imams are infallible. 11 of those imams have come and gone and only one left (Almehdee). Shiites believe he has been living in unknown location for 100s of years waiting for his time to appear to the people.

Sunnis on the other hand do not believe in 12 imams and Sunnis believe that only the Prophet was infallible. the issue of infallibility can not by any means resolved and is a source of impossible agreement. for example the first Imam is Ali may Allah be pleased with him. Shiites claim he is infallible and they Claim that Omar who was the Calipheh before Ali is unrighteous and some say he was a disbeliever. but under his reign Ali was the grand Judge and Ali also named one of his kids after Omar as well as Omar married the daughter of Ali. if Omar was that bad then why would ALi whom they claim is infallible had a good relationship with him and prayed behind him in the mosque. too much info but you get the picture

In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
June 19, 2014 12:52 PM
THIS IRAQ WAR was started by the US and NATO forces, -- (AND NOW?) -- Maliki has to fight this continuous Iraq war, and now a war with Sunni (ISIL) terrorists, and other Sunni terrorists, with an Iraq army that's composed of about 50% Sunni troops, (who refuse to fight against other Sunnis, no matter if they're terrorist or not), and may even shoot the Shia troops in the back....

MY OPINION? -- Those who blame Maliki for the continuing US and NATO Iraq war, -- (AND NOW?) -- for the Sunni (ISIL) terrorists, and other Sunni terrorists attacks, that the Iraq Sunni troops won't fight against, don't have a single clue on the religious politics of Iraq, and the insurmountable difficulties Maliki faces.... (Maliki has to fight a Sunni terrorist attack against Shia Iraq, with half an army of Sunni troops, that won't fight against other Sunnis, no matter if they are terrorists or not). ---- (Maliki didn't create this problem, did he?).

In Response

by: william roosa from: northern virginia
June 19, 2014 10:03 AM
The difference between Sunnis and Shiites is minor and in now way would lead anybody (except other Sunnis and Shiites) to side with one or the other. Kinda like Protestants and Catholics, anybody not a Christian can't tell the difference as they agree 95% of the time.


by: Ali from: India
June 19, 2014 8:56 AM
Only Amerca is responcibel for Iraqs current situation.

In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
June 19, 2014 11:17 AM
The US has led the EU and NATO countries political interference in all these (non-European Union countries), like in Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Yemen, Syria, and now Ukraine, (and now spreading to the bordering countries), and they brought nothing but violence, killings, destruction and wars, that continue on to this day, and they never brought peace of any kind... (YEA, they're to blame)....

In Response

by: Strellnikov from: BF Egypt
June 19, 2014 9:25 AM
Ali you should know something of loose affiliations of people that pretend to have country; a functioning, viable country. Only the ignorant and foolish would lay the blame squarely on the US. What does India do for the world or humanity? Absolutely nothing.


by: vanda from: florida
June 19, 2014 8:41 AM
Please, please give ME $25 billion dollars and see what I can do with it to save the world instead of just the Iraqi's. There are at least 5 camps over over a million people each who have people starving to death daily in Africa. Oh, I forgot, Africa doesn't have oil close by. There are over a million Syrian refugees living around the Turkey border who need food, clothing, sanitation, and shelter--- they left their homes with NOTHING. That doesn't include all the people in India, and Mexico who at least need clean, distilled water. There are many others who would at least do something with the money than cut and run.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
To Make A Living, Nairobi Street Vendors Face Legal Hurdles, Physical Violencei
X
Lenny Ruvaga
November 27, 2014 7:05 PM
The Nairobi City Council has been accused of brutality in dealing with hawkers in the Central Business District - in order to stop them from illegally selling their wares on the streets. Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.
Video

Video To Make A Living, Nairobi Street Vendors Face Legal Hurdles, Physical Violence

The Nairobi City Council has been accused of brutality in dealing with hawkers in the Central Business District - in order to stop them from illegally selling their wares on the streets. Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.
Video

Video For Obama, Ferguson Violence is a Personal Issue

Throughout the crisis in Ferguson, Missouri, President Barack Obama has urged calm, restraint and respect for the rule of law. But the events in Ferguson have prompted him to call — more openly than he has before — for profound changes to end the racism and distrust that he believes still exists between whites and blacks in the United States. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Video

Video Online Magazine Gets Kids Discussing Big Questions

Teen culture in America is often criticized for being superficial. But an online magazine has been encouraging some teenagers to explore deeper issues, and rewarding their efforts. VOA religion reporter Jerome Socolovsky went to this year’s Kidspirit awards ceremony in New York.
Video

Video US Community Kicks Off Thanksgiving With Parade

Thursday is Thanksgiving in the United States, a holiday whose roots go back to the country's earliest days as a British colony. One way Americans celebrate the occasion is with parades. Anush Avetisyan takes us to one such event on the day before Thanksgiving near Washington, where a community's diversity is on display. Joy Wagner narrates
Video

Video Aung San Suu Kyi: Myanmar Opposition to Keep Pushing for Constitutional Change

Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she and her supporters will continue pushing to amend a constitutional clause that bars her from running for president next year. VOA's Than Lwin Htun reports from the capital Naypyitaw in this report narrated by Colin Lovett.
Video

Video Mali Attempts to Shut Down Ebola Transmission Chain

Senegal and Nigeria were able to stop small Ebola outbreaks by closely monitoring those who had contact with the sick person and quickly isolating anyone with symptoms. Mali is now scrambling to do the same. VOA’s Anne Look reports from Mali on what the country is doing to shut down the chain of transmission.
Video

Video Ukraine Marks Anniversary of Deadly 1930s Famine

During a commemoration for millions who died of starvation in Ukraine in the early 1930s, President Petro Poroshenko lashed out at Soviet-era totalitarianism for causing the deaths and accused today’s Russian-backed rebels in the east of using similar tactics. VOA’s Daniel Shearf reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video Hong Kong Protests at a Crossroads

New public opinion polls in Hong Kong indicate declining support for pro-democracy demonstrations after weeks of street protests. VOA’s Bill Ide in Guangzhou and Pros Laput in Hong Kong spoke with protesters and observers about whether demonstrators have been too aggressive in pushing for change.
Video

Video US Immigration Relief Imminent for Mixed-Status Families

Tens of thousands of undocumented immigrants in the Washington, D.C., area may benefit from a controversial presidential order announced this week. It's not a path to citizenship, as some activists hoped. But it will allow more immigrants who arrived as children or who have citizen children, to avoid deportation and work legally. VOA's Victoria Macchi talks with one young man who benefited from an earlier presidential order, and whose parents may now benefit after years of living in fear.
Video

Video New Skateboard Defies Gravity

A futuristic dream only a couple of decades ago, the hoverboard – a skateboard that floats above the ground - has finally been made possible. While still not ready for mass production, it promises to become a cool mode of transport... at least over some surfaces. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Falling Gas Prices Impact US Oil Extraction

With the price of oil now less than $80 a barrel, motorists throughout the United States are benefiting from gas prices below $3 a gallon. But as VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, the decreasing price of petroleum has a downside for the hydraulic fracturing industry in the United States.
Video

Video Tensions Build on Korean Peninsula Amid Military Drills

It has been another tense week on the Korean peninsula as Pyongyang threatened to again test nuclear weapons while the U.S. and South Korean forces held joint military exercises in a show of force. VOA’s Brian Padden reports from the Kunsan Air Base in South Korea.
Video

Video Mama Sarah Obama Honored at UN Women’s Entrepreneurship Day

President Barack Obama's step-grandmother is in the United States to raise money to build a $12 million school and hospital center in Kogelo, Kenya, the birthplace of the president's father, Barack Obama, Sr. She was honored for her decades of work to aid poor Kenyans at a Women's Entrepreneurship Day at the United Nations.
Video

Video Ebola Economic Toll Stirs W. Africa Food Security Concerns

The World Bank said Wednesday that it expects the economic impact of the Ebola outbreak on the sub-Saharan economy to cost somewhere betweenf $3 billion to $4 billion - well below a previously-outlined worst-case scenario of $32 billion. Some economists, however, paint a gloomier picture - warning that the disruption to regional markets and trading is considerable. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Chaos, Abuse Defy Solution in Libya

The political and security crisis in Libya is deepening, with competing governments and, according to Amnesty International, widespread human rights violations committed with impunity. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London.
Video

Video US Hosts Record 866,000 Foreign Students

Close to 900,000 international students are studying at American universities and colleges, more than ever before. About half of them come from Asia, mostly China. The United States hosts more foreign students than any other country in the world, and its foreign student population is steadily growing. Zlatica Hoke reports.

All About America

AppleAndroid