News / Africa

Islamic Sect Says No Peace Talks With Nigerian Government

This file image taken from video posted by Boko Haram sympathizers made available on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2012 shows Imam Abubakar Shekau, the leader of the radical Islamist sect Boko Haram.This file image taken from video posted by Boko Haram sympathizers made available on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2012 shows Imam Abubakar Shekau, the leader of the radical Islamist sect Boko Haram.
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This file image taken from video posted by Boko Haram sympathizers made available on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2012 shows Imam Abubakar Shekau, the leader of the radical Islamist sect Boko Haram.
This file image taken from video posted by Boko Haram sympathizers made available on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2012 shows Imam Abubakar Shekau, the leader of the radical Islamist sect Boko Haram.
VOA News
The suspected leader of the Nigerian Islamist militant group Boko Haram is denying government claims that the group is involved in peace talks.

In a video posted on YouTube, Abubakar Shekau says group members have not sat down with government officials in a dialogue.

The video could not be independently authenticated.

Shekau also said Abul Qaqa, the group's suspected spokesman, is still alive despite claims from Nigeria's military that he was killed by security forces last month.

In addition, Shekau said security forces have begun to arrest the wives of members of the group. In the video, he threatened the wives of Nigerian government officials.

Boko Haram is believed to have several factions, which has confused government efforts to end the violence, either through security measures or negotiations.

The radical sect has been blamed for more than 1,400 deaths in Nigeria since 2010.  Most of the bombings and shootings attributed to the group have taken place in northern Nigeria.

The group says it wants a hardline form of Sharia law imposed throughout the country.

Nigeria's population of 160 million is divided roughly between a mostly Muslim north and predominantly Christian south.

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by: Princess from: Computer Operator
October 05, 2012 12:58 PM
the boko-haram is not suposse to come to this country and kill people only to make money. they are wrong. if it a pastor will pray on it not naitve doctor no they are wrong.


by: Bartski from: Vancouver
October 02, 2012 11:49 PM
One of the priorities of the Islamists in Mali is the destruction of revered Muslim grave sites & monuments, of historic significance, as they see this as unIslamic. This is also the viewpoint of the Salafi/Wahabi brand of Islam that controls Saudi Arabia, I believe. They believe that these practices lead to idol worship. So, it makes one wonder about the source of financial support for the terrorists in Mali, who already have the northern part of Mali under their control.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
October 02, 2012 1:32 PM
By whatever name anyone wants to go, boko haram is a godforsaken name. Abubakar Shekau and Abul Qaqa came from the bottomless pit and are not humans. Abul Qaqa has been killed by the security forces following a tip off, that's a cinch. The claim that he's not dead is just to fool new recruits who would have become despondent because of the speed at which these hooligans are killed. Shekau is looking for money - he's a hungry person. But he has spoilt his game by having blood on his hands.

The Nigerian government does not have the people's mandate to negotiate whatsoever with boko haram. Just release the security agencies against them. They cannot succeed but Nigeria must survive, for they are just a bunch of useless and ignorant illiterates who cannot find their footing in the country and so want to register through violence. They will soon find out that they are used as scapegoats to mitigate the desires of the rich who send their own children abroad to study while sending them on suicide missions to be killed like rats.They lost and must not be reintegrated into the country but must be found out and destroyed, for that's all they have signed and deserve no better.


by: Peter from: Lagos
October 02, 2012 10:31 AM
The so-called Arab Spring, specifically in Libya, has served to bring an abundance of weapons to the hands of the Al Quida and their minion enabling them to launch an islamist invasion of Mali in West Africa. Unless they are stopped right now, it could spell the doom of Christianity and moderate Islam in West Africa, and indeed ultimately in the rest of Africa. Those islamists must never be allowed to gain a foot-hold in Mali. Their removal requires immediate action because their territorial ambition goes much beyond Mali..

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