News / Middle East

    Israeli Gunfire Kills Palestinian Near Gaza Border

    Palestinians stand close to the fence as an Israeli tank is seen on the border between Israel and southern Gaza Strip, November 23, 2012.
    Palestinians stand close to the fence as an Israeli tank is seen on the border between Israel and southern Gaza Strip, November 23, 2012.
    VOA News
    Israeli gunfire at the Gaza Strip border has killed a Palestinian — the first death since a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas militants halted eight days of deadly fighting.
     
    Palestinian medical officials say Anwar Qdeih was shot as he approached the border fence Friday with a group of Palestinians. Several others were wounded in the violence. Reuters news agency quotes a relative of Qdeih as saying he was trying to place a Hamas flag on the fence.



    Israel's military says warning shots were fired in the air when about 300 Palestinians approached the border fence in southern Gaza. The military says after the Palestinians refused to move back, troops fired at their legs. 
     
    The military also says a Palestinian crossed into Israel during the unrest and was returned to Gaza by soldiers.
     
    Hamas accused Israel of violating the Egyptian-mediated truce and said the militant group will contact Egyptian officials to discuss the incident.
     
    The violence comes amid more than a day of quiet skies, after an Egyptian-brokered truce went into effect late Wednesday.
     
    Gaza's Hamas prime minister, Ismail Haniyeh, hailed the territory's multiple militant groups for respecting the cease-fire.
     
    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said his government was "giving the truce a chance," but was prepared for its possible collapse.
     
    As a precaution, schools remained closed in southern Israel, where nerves were on edge after a constant rain of rockets during the most serious Israeli-Palestinian fighting in four years.
     
    Egypt is monitoring both sides for violations of the cease-fire agreement. The truce follows several days of intense aerial assaults on both sides of the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, leaving more than 160 Palestinians and six Israelis dead.
     
    According to tenets of the truce, border areas from Gaza would be opened, allowing people and goods to move in and out of the territory, if Israel and the Hamas militants who run the Gaza Strip successfully maintained peace for a 24-hour period. According to The Associated Press, "Egypt is hosting separate talks with Israeli and Hamas envoys on ... a new border deal for blockaded Gaza."
     
    The Secretary General of the Palestinian People's Party, Bassam al-Salhi, visited China Friday. He expressed thanks for China's long-standing support of Palestinian statehood.

    Story continues below
    • Smoke billows from the site of an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City, November 21, 2012.
    • A Palestinian man reacts as flames and smoke rise from a smuggling tunnel after an Israeli strike along the border between Egypt and Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip, November 21, 2012.
    • Israelis look at a blown up bus at the site of a bombing in Tel Aviv, Israel, November 21, 2012.
    • Israeli rescue workers and paramedics carry a wounded person from the site of a bombing in Tel Aviv, Israel, November 21, 2012.
    • Palestinian children stand in rubble after an Israeli strike on a house in Gaza City, November 20, 2012.
    • An Israeli soldier stands on a tank at a staging area near the Israel-Gaza Strip Border, November 20, 2012.
    • A Palestinian inspects the damage to a soccer stadium after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City, November 19, 2012.
    • Smoke and fire rise up from an explosion in Gaza City, November 19, 2012.
    • A Palestinian man waves the national flag during a protest against Israel's operations in Gaza Strip, outside Ofer, an Israeli military prison near the city of Ramallah, November 18, 2012.
    • An Israeli police officer gestures in front of a burning car after a rocket fired by Palestinian militants in Gaza landed in the southern city of Ashkelon, November 18, 2012. (Reuters)
    • Members of the Palestinian Civil Defense help a survivor after he was pulled out from under the rubble of his destroyed house after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City, November 18, 2012.
    • An Iron Dome launcher fires an interceptor rocket in the southern city of Ashdod, Israel, November 16, 2012.
    • A Palestinian man kisses the body of one of his children during their funeral in the northern Gaza Strip, November 18, 2012.
    • An Israeli soldier runs with his weapon during a drill simulating a possible ground invasion into the Gaza Strip, at a base south of the West Bank city of Hebron, November 17, 2012.
    "What we need is to make international protection of this truce and international protection for the Palestine people," he said. "We will continue our political efforts to have this membership in the United Nations."
     
    Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Ying Chun said China welcomed the cease-fire. She urged the international community to make greater efforts for mediation and push Israel and the Palestinians to resume peace talks for progress.
     
    Hua says China will maintain close communication with parties concerned in efforts to bring peace to the region.
     
    Wednesday's cease-fire agreement was reached amid hours of intense diplomacy involving U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.
     
    Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has given a tentative approval to the deal.
     
    Israel and Hamas had traded rocket fire for eight days since an Israeli missile killed Hamas's military chief in Gaza City last week. Israel says the attack was in response to months of almost daily rocket fire into southern Israel from Gaza.

    You May Like

    Native Americans Ask: What About Our Water Supply?

    They say they have been facing a dangerous water contaminant for decades - uranium – but the problem has received far less attention than water contamination by lead in Flint, Michigan

    Pakistan's President Urges Nation Not to Celebrate Valentine's Day

    Mamnoon Hussain criticizes Valentine's Day, which falls on Sunday this year, as a Western import that threatens to undermine the Islamic values of Pakistan

    Mother of IS Supporter: Son Was Peaceful, 'Role Model'

    Somali-American Abdirizak Mohamed Warsame pleaded guilty Thursday to charges of conspiring to provide material support to Islamic State militants

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Leta Gada from: Ethiopi
    November 25, 2012 1:13 AM
    God (Allah) is the most compassionate one! People in Gaza(+West Bank) and Israel seem to believe in this. If so, why sweet babies in these two places denied this compassion by rockets and chariots(+drones???)


    by: ronju from: bangladesh
    November 23, 2012 11:48 PM
    Where are Americans and Europeans who talking a lot taking malala, can not see the hundreds of malala are dying every day in Gaza. Shame, Shame......

    by: Haron from: Afghanistan
    November 23, 2012 12:50 PM
    where is Human Rights to halt this killings? where is America and European countries to stop Israel immediately? only there is Human rights watch on Afghanistan to halt the executions. focusing on the problems and mistakes of Afghan government. all of 31 million people support of these executions from foreigners to domestic guilty. they must be hanging. we believe any time when European countries or America focus on their own countries and solve their problems then in Afghanistan there will be real democracy.

    by: NVO from: USA
    November 23, 2012 12:00 PM
    A so called truce brokered by the MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD, A FANATICAL GROUP. WHOM HATES ISRAEL. WHAT A SHAM!!!!!!!

    by: Barlow
    November 23, 2012 8:32 AM
    The Germans don't shoot the French if one of them approaches their border. The Spanish don't shoot the Italians if one of their citizens approach their border. It's always the occupier, aggressor, and violent Jews who cast the first stone and use it as an excuse for committing genocidal acts in order to fulfill their land stealing agenda. We SEE what's going on. We SEE the truth behind their barbarity. We have chatted with Palestinians during the recent bombings and killings, and we have seen the rabid bloodthirsty violence of the Jewish people calling for violence and the taking of human life. We in the states know the truth.

    by: Brad Naksuthin
    November 23, 2012 8:05 AM
    60 years ago in the United States black people couldn't even eat in the same restaurant as white people. They couldn't live in white neighborhoods, go to white schools, drink from white drinking fountains, sit side by side on the same bus.

    60 years later blacks and whites have learned to work and live together side by side in peace. Even electing a black President.

    Meanwhile in Israel a childish schoolyard feud between Jews and Palestinians has been going on for over 60 years, too.

    Only unlike the blacks and whites, Jews and Palestinians are no closer to living side by side in peace today than they were 60 years ago.

    During those 60 years Apartheid in South Africa i ended; Communists and Capitalists figured out a way to co-exists and cooperate; the IRA ended its bloody war in Ireland; America and Communist Vietnam buried their differences and now share diplomatic and trade relations.

    People across the globe have learned to put aside their differences and beliefs and have learned that there is more to be gained by working together than fighting against each other.

    Only the the Jews and the Palestinians, continue their 60 year old feud of self-righteous hatred and revenge.

    If Jews and Palestinians can't be creative enough to find a way to live in peace...like everyone else...maybe they should be left to bomb each other for another 60 years or until nothing is left in Israel and Gaza but of rubble and dead bodies.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Two-thirds of World Faces Water Shortagei
    X
    February 12, 2016 7:31 PM
    Four billion people — or two out of every three on the planet — do not have enough water to meet their basic needs. That is far greater than previously thought, according to a new study that presents a more accurate picture of the problem. As VOA's Rosanne Skirble reports, the findings will help policymakers and the public craft solutions to address the threat.
    Video

    Video Two-thirds of World Faces Water Shortage

    Four billion people — or two out of every three on the planet — do not have enough water to meet their basic needs. That is far greater than previously thought, according to a new study that presents a more accurate picture of the problem. As VOA's Rosanne Skirble reports, the findings will help policymakers and the public craft solutions to address the threat.
    Video

    Video Gateway to Mecca: Historical Old Jeddah

    Local leader Sami Nawar's family has been in the Old City of Jeddah for hundreds of years and takes us on a tour of this ancient route to Mecca, also believed to be the final resting place of Adam's wife, Eve.
    Video

    Video New Technology Aims to Bring Election Transparency to Uganda

    A team of recent graduates from Uganda’s Makerere University has created a mobile application designed to help monitor elections and expose possible rigging. The developers say the app, called E-Poll, will make Uganda's democratic process fairer. From Kampala, VOA's Serginho Roosblad reports.
    Video

    Video As Refugees Perish, Greek Graveyards Fill

    Aid workers on the Greek island of Lesbos say they are struggling to bury the increasing number of bodies of refugees that have been recovered or washed up ashore in recent months.  The graveyards are all full, they say, yet as tens of thousands of people clamor to get out of Syria, it is clear refugees will still be coming in record numbers. For VOA, Hamada Elrasam reports from Lesbos, Greece.
    Video

    Video Russia Bristles at NATO Expansion in E. Europe

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov is meeting Friday with the head of NATO after the Western military alliance and the United States announced plans for the biggest military build-up in Europe since the Cold War. Russia has called NATO's moves a threat to stability in Europe. But NATO says the troop rotations and equipment are aimed at reassuring allies concerned about Russia as VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
    Video

    Video To Fight Zika, Scientists Target Mosquitoes

    Mosquitoes strike again. The Zika virus outbreak is just the latest headline-grabbing epidemic carried by these biting pests, but researchers are fighting back with new ways to control them. VOA's Steve Baragona takes a look.
    Video

    Video Mosul Refugees Talk About Life Under IS

    A top U.S. intelligence official told Congress this week that a planned Iraqi-led operation to re-take the city of Mosul from Islamic State militants is unlikely to take place this year. IS took over the city in June 2014, and for the past year and a half, Mosul residents have been held captive under its rule. VOA's Zana Omar talked to some families who managed to escape. Bronwyn Benito narrates his report.
    Video

    Video Scientists Make Progress Toward Better Diabetes Treatment, Cure

    Scientists at two of the top U.S. universities say they have made significant advances in their quest to find a more efficient treatment for diabetes and eventually a cure. According to the International Diabetes Federation, the disease affects more than 370 million people worldwide. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video NATO to Target Migrant Smugglers

    NATO has announced plans to send warships to the Aegean Sea to target migrant smugglers in the alliance's most direct intervention so far since a wave of people began trying to reach European shores.
    Video

    Video Russia's Catholics, Orthodox Hopeful on Historic Pope-Patriarch Meeting

    Russia's Catholic minority has welcomed an historic first meeting Friday in Cuba between the Pope and the Patriarch of Russia's dominant Orthodox Church. The Orthodox Church split with Rome in 1054 and analysts say politics, both church and state, have been driving the relationship in the centuries since. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
    Video

    Video Used Books Get a New Life on the Streets of Lagos

    Used booksellers are importing books from abroad and selling them on the streets of Africa's largest city. What‘s popular with readers may surprise you. Chris Stein reports from Lagos.
    Video

    Video After NH Primaries All Eyes on South Carolina

    After Tuesday's primary in New Hampshire, US presidential candidates swiftly turned to the next election coming up in South Carolina. The so-called “first-in-the-South” poll may help further narrow down the field of candidates. Zlatica Hoke reports.
    Video

    Video Smartphone Helps Grow Vegetables

    One day, you may be using your smartphone to grow your vegetables. A Taipei-based company has developed a farm cube — a small, enclosed ecosystem designed to grow plants indoors. The environment inside is automatically adjusted by the cube, but it can also be controlled through an app. VOA's Deborah Block has more on the gardening system.
    Video

    Video Exhibit Turns da Vinci’s Drawings Into Real Objects

    In addition to being a successful artist, Renaissance genius Leonardo da Vinci designed many practical machines, some of which are still in use today, although in different forms. But a number of his projects were never realized — until today. VOA’s George Putic reports.