News / Middle East

Israeli Gunfire Kills Palestinian Near Gaza Border

Palestinians stand close to the fence as an Israeli tank is seen on the border between Israel and southern Gaza Strip, November 23, 2012.
Palestinians stand close to the fence as an Israeli tank is seen on the border between Israel and southern Gaza Strip, November 23, 2012.
VOA News
Israeli gunfire at the Gaza Strip border has killed a Palestinian — the first death since a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas militants halted eight days of deadly fighting.
 
Palestinian medical officials say Anwar Qdeih was shot as he approached the border fence Friday with a group of Palestinians. Several others were wounded in the violence. Reuters news agency quotes a relative of Qdeih as saying he was trying to place a Hamas flag on the fence.



Israel's military says warning shots were fired in the air when about 300 Palestinians approached the border fence in southern Gaza. The military says after the Palestinians refused to move back, troops fired at their legs. 
 
The military also says a Palestinian crossed into Israel during the unrest and was returned to Gaza by soldiers.
 
Hamas accused Israel of violating the Egyptian-mediated truce and said the militant group will contact Egyptian officials to discuss the incident.
 
The violence comes amid more than a day of quiet skies, after an Egyptian-brokered truce went into effect late Wednesday.
 
Gaza's Hamas prime minister, Ismail Haniyeh, hailed the territory's multiple militant groups for respecting the cease-fire.
 
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said his government was "giving the truce a chance," but was prepared for its possible collapse.
 
As a precaution, schools remained closed in southern Israel, where nerves were on edge after a constant rain of rockets during the most serious Israeli-Palestinian fighting in four years.
 
Egypt is monitoring both sides for violations of the cease-fire agreement. The truce follows several days of intense aerial assaults on both sides of the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, leaving more than 160 Palestinians and six Israelis dead.
 
According to tenets of the truce, border areas from Gaza would be opened, allowing people and goods to move in and out of the territory, if Israel and the Hamas militants who run the Gaza Strip successfully maintained peace for a 24-hour period. According to The Associated Press, "Egypt is hosting separate talks with Israeli and Hamas envoys on ... a new border deal for blockaded Gaza."
 
The Secretary General of the Palestinian People's Party, Bassam al-Salhi, visited China Friday. He expressed thanks for China's long-standing support of Palestinian statehood.

Story continues below
  • Smoke billows from the site of an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City, November 21, 2012.
  • A Palestinian man reacts as flames and smoke rise from a smuggling tunnel after an Israeli strike along the border between Egypt and Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip, November 21, 2012.
  • Israelis look at a blown up bus at the site of a bombing in Tel Aviv, Israel, November 21, 2012.
  • Israeli rescue workers and paramedics carry a wounded person from the site of a bombing in Tel Aviv, Israel, November 21, 2012.
  • Palestinian children stand in rubble after an Israeli strike on a house in Gaza City, November 20, 2012.
  • An Israeli soldier stands on a tank at a staging area near the Israel-Gaza Strip Border, November 20, 2012.
  • A Palestinian inspects the damage to a soccer stadium after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City, November 19, 2012.
  • Smoke and fire rise up from an explosion in Gaza City, November 19, 2012.
  • A Palestinian man waves the national flag during a protest against Israel's operations in Gaza Strip, outside Ofer, an Israeli military prison near the city of Ramallah, November 18, 2012.
  • An Israeli police officer gestures in front of a burning car after a rocket fired by Palestinian militants in Gaza landed in the southern city of Ashkelon, November 18, 2012. (Reuters)
  • Members of the Palestinian Civil Defense help a survivor after he was pulled out from under the rubble of his destroyed house after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City, November 18, 2012.
  • An Iron Dome launcher fires an interceptor rocket in the southern city of Ashdod, Israel, November 16, 2012.
  • A Palestinian man kisses the body of one of his children during their funeral in the northern Gaza Strip, November 18, 2012.
  • An Israeli soldier runs with his weapon during a drill simulating a possible ground invasion into the Gaza Strip, at a base south of the West Bank city of Hebron, November 17, 2012.
"What we need is to make international protection of this truce and international protection for the Palestine people," he said. "We will continue our political efforts to have this membership in the United Nations."
 
Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Ying Chun said China welcomed the cease-fire. She urged the international community to make greater efforts for mediation and push Israel and the Palestinians to resume peace talks for progress.
 
Hua says China will maintain close communication with parties concerned in efforts to bring peace to the region.
 
Wednesday's cease-fire agreement was reached amid hours of intense diplomacy involving U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.
 
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has given a tentative approval to the deal.
 
Israel and Hamas had traded rocket fire for eight days since an Israeli missile killed Hamas's military chief in Gaza City last week. Israel says the attack was in response to months of almost daily rocket fire into southern Israel from Gaza.

You May Like

Jihadist Assassin says Goal of Tunisia Murders Was Chaos

Abu Muqatil at-Tunusi’s remarks in a propaganda interview also cast light on attack on Bardo Museum More

Russia Denies License to Tatar-Language TV Station in Crimea

OSCE official says denial shows 'politically selective censorship of free and independent voices in Crimea is continuing' More

Kenyan Startups Tackle Expensive Remittances Through Bitcoin

Some think services could give Western Union a run for its money, though others say it’s still got a long way to go More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Leta Gada from: Ethiopi
November 25, 2012 1:13 AM
God (Allah) is the most compassionate one! People in Gaza(+West Bank) and Israel seem to believe in this. If so, why sweet babies in these two places denied this compassion by rockets and chariots(+drones???)


by: ronju from: bangladesh
November 23, 2012 11:48 PM
Where are Americans and Europeans who talking a lot taking malala, can not see the hundreds of malala are dying every day in Gaza. Shame, Shame......

by: Haron from: Afghanistan
November 23, 2012 12:50 PM
where is Human Rights to halt this killings? where is America and European countries to stop Israel immediately? only there is Human rights watch on Afghanistan to halt the executions. focusing on the problems and mistakes of Afghan government. all of 31 million people support of these executions from foreigners to domestic guilty. they must be hanging. we believe any time when European countries or America focus on their own countries and solve their problems then in Afghanistan there will be real democracy.

by: NVO from: USA
November 23, 2012 12:00 PM
A so called truce brokered by the MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD, A FANATICAL GROUP. WHOM HATES ISRAEL. WHAT A SHAM!!!!!!!

by: Barlow
November 23, 2012 8:32 AM
The Germans don't shoot the French if one of them approaches their border. The Spanish don't shoot the Italians if one of their citizens approach their border. It's always the occupier, aggressor, and violent Jews who cast the first stone and use it as an excuse for committing genocidal acts in order to fulfill their land stealing agenda. We SEE what's going on. We SEE the truth behind their barbarity. We have chatted with Palestinians during the recent bombings and killings, and we have seen the rabid bloodthirsty violence of the Jewish people calling for violence and the taking of human life. We in the states know the truth.

by: Brad Naksuthin
November 23, 2012 8:05 AM
60 years ago in the United States black people couldn't even eat in the same restaurant as white people. They couldn't live in white neighborhoods, go to white schools, drink from white drinking fountains, sit side by side on the same bus.

60 years later blacks and whites have learned to work and live together side by side in peace. Even electing a black President.

Meanwhile in Israel a childish schoolyard feud between Jews and Palestinians has been going on for over 60 years, too.

Only unlike the blacks and whites, Jews and Palestinians are no closer to living side by side in peace today than they were 60 years ago.

During those 60 years Apartheid in South Africa i ended; Communists and Capitalists figured out a way to co-exists and cooperate; the IRA ended its bloody war in Ireland; America and Communist Vietnam buried their differences and now share diplomatic and trade relations.

People across the globe have learned to put aside their differences and beliefs and have learned that there is more to be gained by working together than fighting against each other.

Only the the Jews and the Palestinians, continue their 60 year old feud of self-righteous hatred and revenge.

If Jews and Palestinians can't be creative enough to find a way to live in peace...like everyone else...maybe they should be left to bomb each other for another 60 years or until nothing is left in Israel and Gaza but of rubble and dead bodies.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
For Obama, It's More Business Than Friendships With World Leadersi
X
Aru Pande
April 01, 2015 9:09 PM
The rift between President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has put a spotlight on the importance of the American leader’s personal relationships with other world leaders and what role such friendships play in foreign policy. VOA's Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video For Obama, It's More Business Than Friendships With World Leaders

The rift between President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has put a spotlight on the importance of the American leader’s personal relationships with other world leaders and what role such friendships play in foreign policy. VOA's Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video Buhari: Nigeria Has ‘Embraced Democracy’

Nigeria woke up to a new president-elect Wednesday, Muhammadu Buhari. But people say democracy is the real winner as the country embarks on its first peaceful handover of power since the end of military rule in 1999. VOA’s Anne Look reports from Abuja.
Video

Video Tiny Camera Sees Inside Blood Vessels

Ahead of any surgical procedure, doctors try to learn as much as possible about the state of the organs they plan to operate on. A new camera developed in the Netherlands can now make that easier - giving surgeons an incredibly detailed look inside blood vessels, all the way to the patient’s heart. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Latin American Groups Seek Fans at Texas Music Festival

Latin American music groups played all over Austin, Texas, during the recent South by Southwest festival, and some made fans out of locals as well as people from around the world who had come to hear music. Such exposure can boost such groups' image back home. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports.
Video

Video Stockton Community, Police, Work to Improve Relations

Relations are tense between minority communities and police departments around the United States following police shootings that have generated widely-publicized protests. VOA's Mike O’Sullivan reports from Stockton, California, where police and community groups are working toward solutions, with backing from Washington.
Video

Video Indiana Controversy Highlights Divergent Meanings of Religious Freedom

Indiana’s state government has triggered a nationwide controversy by approving a law that critics say is aimed at allowing discrimination against gays and lesbians. The controversy stems from divergent notions of religious freedom in America. VOA's Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Report: State of Black America a 'Tale of Two Nations'

The National Urban League has described this year's "State of Black America" report as a "tale of two nations." The group's annual report, released earlier this month (March), found that under an equality index African Americans had only 72% parity compared to whites in areas such as education, economics, health, social justice and civic engagement. It’s a gap that educators and students at Brooklyn’s Medgar Evers College are looking to close. VOA's Daniela Schrier reports from the school.
Video

Video Film Tells Story of Musicians in Mali Threatened by Jihadists

At this year's annual South by Southwest film and music festival in Austin, Texas, some musicians from Mali were on hand to promote a film about how their lives were upturned by jihadists who destroyed ancient treasures in the city of Timbuktu and prohibited anyone from playing music under threat of death. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Austin, some are afraid to return to their hometowns even though the jihadists are no longer in control there.
Video

Video Ebola Vaccine Trials Underway in West Africa

Ebola has claimed the lives of more than 10,000 people in West Africa. Since last summer, researchers have rushed to get anti-Ebola vaccines into clinical trials. While it's too early to say that any of the potential vaccines work, some scientists say they are seeing strong results from some of the studies. VOA's Carol Pearson reports.
Video

Video Philippines Wants Tourists Spending Money at New Casinos

Tourism is a multi-billion dollar industry in the Philippines. Close to five million foreign visitors traveled there last year, perhaps lured by the country’s tropical beaches. But Jason Strother reports from Manila that the country hopes to entice more travelers to stay indoors and spend money inside new casinos.
Video

Video Civilian Casualties Push Men to Join Rebels in Ukraine

The continued fighting in eastern Ukraine and the shelling of civilian neighborhoods seem to be pushing more men to join the separatist fighters. Many of the new recruits are residents of Ukraine made bitter by new grievances, as well as old. VOA's Patrick Wells reports.
Video

Video Cambodian Land Grabs Threaten Traditional Communities

Indigenous communities in Cambodia's Ratanakiri province say the government’s economic land concession policy is taking away their land and traditional way of life, making many fear that their identity will soon be lost. Local authorities, though, have denied this is the case. VOA's Say Mony went to investigate and filed this report, narrated by Colin Lovett.

VOA Blogs

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More