News / Middle East

    US Condemns Killing of Palestinian Teen

    • A Palestinian stone-thrower stands near a burning tire during clashes with Israeli police in Shuafat, an Arab suburb of Jerusalem, July 2, 2014.
    • An Israeli border police officer takes up position during clashes with Palestinian stone-throwers in Shuafat, an Arab suburb of Jerusalem, July 2, 2014.
    • A Palestinian hurls a stone towards Israeli police during clashes in Shuafat, an Arab suburb of Jerusalem, July 2, 2014.
    • Israeli army soldiers fire tear gas during clashes with Palestinians in an operation in the West Bank city of Jenin, July 2, 2014.
    • A Palestinian takes cover from tear gas fired by the Israeli troops during clashes with Palestinians in the West Bank city of Jenin, July 2, 2014.
    • Israeli soldiers detain a blindfolded Palestinian man in the West Bank city of Hebron, July 2, 2014.
    • Smoke rises from the family home of Palestinian Ziad Awad in the town of Idna, west of the West Bank city of Hebron, July 2, 2014. Israel accuses Awad of having killed an Israeli police officer in April.
    VOA News

    Secretary of State John Kerry has strongly condemned what he termed the "despicable and senseless abduction and murder" of Muhammad Hussein Abu Khdeir, a teenager who Palestinian residents suspect was kidnapped and killed in revenge for the deaths of three Israeli teens.

    The Israeli youths were abducted June 12 while on their way home from school in the West Bank. Hostilities, simmering ever since, flared when their bodies were discovered Monday near Hebron.

    The State Department, which had forcefully decried the Israeli teens' abduction, denounced the actions again Khdeir. The Arab teen's body was found early Wednesday morning in a wooded area near Jerusalem.

    Authorities had received calls hours earlier that a Palestinian youth outside a mosque was forced into a car in an Arab section of the city. News accounts have differed on whether Khdeir was 16 or 17.

    "It is sickening to think of an innocent 17-year-old boy snatched off the streets and his life stolen from him and his family," Kerry's statement said. "There are no words to convey adequately our condolences to the Palestinian people."

    White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters Wednesday the U.S. has no assessment yet of whether killing was revenge and urged all sides to behave responsibly.

    "We look to both the government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority to take all necessary steps to prevent acts of violence and bring their perpetrators to justice," the statement said, adding that "violence only leads to more violence."

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is urging all sides not to take the law into their own hands and called for a swift investigation into the abduction of the Palestinian teenager.

    Police have yet to confirm that the body found is that of Mohammed Abu Khudair. But witnesses say they saw several Israelis forcing him into a car in East Jerusalem before speeding off.

    Netanyahu said he has asked law enforcement to find out who was behind the  "reprehensible murder."

    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas called for Netanyahu to condemn the killing, just as he did in the case of the Israeli teens.

    Clashes erupt

    The discovery of Khdeir's body sparked new outrage, with several hundred Palestinians protesting in East Jerusalem. They threw stones as they clashed with Israeli security forces, who responded with rubber bullets and tear gas.

    Israeli police said the abduction may have been a revenge killing by Jews or a criminal act, such as a feud between Arab clans.

    Police Commissioner Yohanan Danino urged the public not to draw conclusions and to act with restraint.

    There were also smaller-scale clashes in the West Bank city of Jenin after Israeli forces raided the area.

    On Tuesday, tens of thousands of people gathered in central Israel for the burial of the three Israeli teenagers. Israeli leaders have accused Hamas of abducting and killing the three and vowed to punish the militant group. 

    Hamas has neither confirmed nor denied Israel's allegations about its role in the disappearance of the students.

    Authorities arrested hundreds of Hamas members while searching for the teens.

    Robert Berger contributed to this report from Jerusalem.

    You May Like

    Video As Refugees Perish, Greek Graveyards Fill

    Before burial at overflowing cemeteries, unidentified dead being swapped for DNA, in case some day relatives come to learn their fate

    Russian Opposition Leader Sues Putin for Conflict of Interest

    Alexei Navalny tells VOA in exclusive interview why transfer of $2 billion from country’s wealth fund to company with ties to President Putin’s son-in-law triggered lawsuit

    How Diversity Has Changed America

    Over the past four decades, the level of diversity in the United States has increased most in these four states

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: meanbill from: USA
    July 02, 2014 9:30 PM
    QUESTION? -- Was the revenge killing for (3) Israeli students, worth creating a million jihadists.... Israel has lost it's moral compass, and soon it'll need more and more stronger and higher walls, for the arrogant retaliation attacks on the Palestinians...

    by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
    July 02, 2014 7:12 PM
    Israel is different, the fact that the Palestinians kidnapped those kids and murdered them, had it been the Palestinians, they would have fired hundred rockets into Israeli civilians area. But Israel is not like them. Israel fire into their target. Israel has one of the train military in the world. so they don't need to captured a kid and killed for retaliation. This is nonsense, and a cheap propaganda. Those who kidnapped those kids and killed need to taste the same death and see how it feels. Israel needs to sent a strong and a clear message to her enemies. God Bless Israel

    by: sujaye from: usa
    July 02, 2014 6:54 PM
    Kerry jumped the gun. It has not been determined if it was in fact a revenge killing. The kid could have been gay or other family and clan problems. Either way it is horrible but let's not come to quick conclusions yet !

    by: valentine from: lagos
    July 02, 2014 6:41 PM
    Danika, u r very correct.
    U r intelligent too.

    by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
    July 02, 2014 5:38 PM
    The Palestinian kid was kidnapped and murder by his own people. Israel will not do such a vigorous act. Israel will hit directly at a target. She doesn't need to captured a Palestinian teen and killed him in retaliation. Which of course we do want Israel to retaliate. Such a act cannot continue. This is not conductive for Israel nor the Palestinians. Where are the future for the youth? The Palestinians leaders should be held accountable for thier action. They don't expect to hit Israel and thinking that Israel will not hit back, you have lost your mind. We support the action of Israel against terrorists. There is no way any country should live like this. Those who killed those kids mush be brought to justice.
    In Response

    by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
    July 02, 2014 9:27 PM
    John,The Palestinians do more then what Israel is doing. Israel is doing that for cost. The Palestinians fired rocket into Israel for no reason, then when Israel retaliate, the world wants to blame Israel. Why the media cannot report the killing of the Palestinian Christians who have been slaughter in the hands of their Arab neighbors day and night? Is this not a two way streets? Yes we do support that slogan NEVER AGAIN. There is no way that certain group will just sit there and decide to get rid of one ethnic group. No you must fight back. and that is what Israel is doing. Do you know that the grand muffi of Jerusalem ( A PALESTINIAN) was one of those who were behind Hitler final solution? The Palestinians hands are stained with the Jewish people blood also.What give them the right to killed the Jews and the Jews cannot do the same? All that nonsense Mr. Putin was doing, flying F-16 closed to the US coast, if he was going to fired rocket into the US, believe ii or not, the US was going to retaliate. No country has the right to fire rocket into another Country.
    In Response

    by: JOHN27865 from: USA
    July 02, 2014 6:17 PM
    Leroy you must be right. Israel cannot kidnapped and killed any Palestinian but in broad day light captured hundreds of them, bulldozed their homes, killed several during such operations and more over still CRY loudly and chant day and nights "NEVER AGAIN"

    by: Danika from: Canada
    July 02, 2014 3:42 PM
    hey it would be prudent to remember that we are dealing here with Arabs - who strap suicide vests on their children just to kill some innocent Israeli... so, the death of this Arab could have very well been a killing by his own Arab "friends" just to avert a concerted Israeli response...

    by: ali baba from: new york
    July 02, 2014 12:28 PM
    Those who kidnapped three teenage and killed them have committed a crime. Israel or any country in the world has to keep her citizen safe. Palestinian Understand this fact. They understand that Israeli will retaliate excessively and disproportionally. The question Why they kidnapped them on the first place.

    It looks that extremist has been motivated by Iraq situation and acted up. There will be massive bombing and innocent people will be killed. unfortunately, massive bombing and retaliation are the only way to deal with extremist. Those who want to give us lesson of human behavior , should give the lesson to Muslim extremist .Muslim extremists are barbaric and they take advantage of the weak. they understand the language of power

    by: Igor from: Russia
    July 02, 2014 5:57 AM
    Those who are responsible for the killing of three Israeli teenagers must be punished. But those who kidnapped and killed the Palestinian youth must also be punished. If you treats others as animals you will never expected others to treat you as human being.
    In Response

    by: 1worldnow from: Earth
    July 02, 2014 8:27 AM
    Well said!

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    As Refugees Perish, Greek Graveyards Filli
    X
    Hamada Elsaram
    February 11, 2016 8:01 PM
    Aid workers on the Greek island of Lesbos say they are struggling to bury the increasing number of bodies of refugees that have been recovered or washed up ashore in recent months.  The graveyards are all full, they say, yet as tens of thousands of people clamor to get out of Syria, it is clear refugees will still be coming in record numbers. For VOA, Hamada Elrasam reports from Lesbos, Greece.
    Video

    Video As Refugees Perish, Greek Graveyards Fill

    Aid workers on the Greek island of Lesbos say they are struggling to bury the increasing number of bodies of refugees that have been recovered or washed up ashore in recent months.  The graveyards are all full, they say, yet as tens of thousands of people clamor to get out of Syria, it is clear refugees will still be coming in record numbers. For VOA, Hamada Elrasam reports from Lesbos, Greece.
    Video

    Video To Fight Zika, Scientists Target Mosquitoes

    Mosquitoes strike again. The Zika virus outbreak is just the latest headline-grabbing epidemic carried by these biting pests, but researchers are fighting back with new ways to control them. VOA's Steve Baragona takes a look.
    Video

    Video Mosul Refugees Talk About Life Under IS

    A top U.S. intelligence official told Congress this week that a planned Iraqi-led operation to re-take the city of Mosul from Islamic State militants is unlikely to take place this year. IS took over the city in June 2014, and for the past year and a half, Mosul residents have been held captive under its rule. VOA's Zana Omar talked to some families who managed to escape. Bronwyn Benito narrates his report.
    Video

    Video Scientists Make Progress Toward Better Diabetes Treatment, Cure

    Scientists at two of the top U.S. universities say they have made significant advances in their quest to find a more efficient treatment for diabetes and eventually a cure. According to the International Diabetes Federation, the disease affects more than 370 million people worldwide. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video NATO to Target Migrant Smugglers

    NATO has announced plans to send warships to the Aegean Sea to target migrant smugglers in the alliance's most direct intervention so far since a wave of people began trying to reach European shores.
    Video

    Video Russia's Catholics, Orthodox Hopeful on Historic Pope-Patriarch Meeting

    Russia's Catholic minority has welcomed an historic first meeting Friday in Cuba between the Pope and the Patriarch of Russia's dominant Orthodox Church. The Orthodox Church split with Rome in 1054 and analysts say politics, both church and state, have been driving the relationship in the centuries since. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
    Video

    Video Used Books Get a New Life on the Streets of Lagos

    Used booksellers are importing books from abroad and selling them on the streets of Africa's largest city. What‘s popular with readers may surprise you. Chris Stein reports from Lagos.
    Video

    Video After NH Primaries All Eyes on South Carolina

    After Tuesday's primary in New Hampshire, US presidential candidates swiftly turned to the next election coming up in South Carolina. The so-called “first-in-the-South” poll may help further narrow down the field of candidates. Zlatica Hoke reports.
    Video

    Video US Co-ed Selective Service Plan Stirs Controversy

    Young women may soon be required to register with the U.S. Selective Service System, the U.S. government agency charged with implementing a draft in a national emergency. Top Army and Marine Corps commanders told the Senate Armed Services Committee recently that women should register, and a bill has been introduced in Congress requiring eligible women to sign up for the military draft. The issue is stirring some controversy, as VOA’s Bernard Shusman reports from New York.
    Video

    Video Lessons Learned From Ebola Might Help Fight Zika

    Now that the Ebola epidemic has ended in West Africa, Zika has the world's focus. And, as Carol Pearson reports, health experts and governments are applying some of the lessons learned during the Ebola crisis in Africa to fight the Zika virus in Latin America and the Caribbean.
    Video

    Video Smartphone Helps Grow Vegetables

    One day, you may be using your smartphone to grow your vegetables. A Taipei-based company has developed a farm cube — a small, enclosed ecosystem designed to grow plants indoors. The environment inside is automatically adjusted by the cube, but it can also be controlled through an app. VOA's Deborah Block has more on the gardening system.
    Video

    Video Illinois Voters Have Mixed Emotions on Obama’s Return to Springfield

    On the ninth anniversary of the launch of his quest for national office, President Barack Obama returned to Springfield, Illinois, to speak to the Illinois General Assembly, where he once served as state senator. His visit was met with mixed emotions by those with a front-row seat on his journey to the White House. VOA's Kane Farabaugh reports.
    Video

    Video Exhibit Turns da Vinci’s Drawings Into Real Objects

    In addition to being a successful artist, Renaissance genius Leonardo da Vinci designed many practical machines, some of which are still in use today, although in different forms. But a number of his projects were never realized — until today. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Heated Immigration Debate Limits Britain’s Refugee Response

    Compared to many other European states, Britain has agreed to accept a relatively small number of Syrian refugees. Just over a thousand have arrived so far -- and some are being resettled in remote corners of the country. Henry Ridgwell reports on why Britain’s response has lagged behind its neighbors.
    Video

    Video Russia's Car Sales Shrink Overall, But Luxury and Economy Models See Growth

    Car sales in Russia dropped by more than a third in 2015 because of the country's economic woes. But, at the extreme ends of the car market, luxury vehicles and some economy brands are actually experiencing growth. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.