News / Asia

Japan Considers Stationing Officials on Disputed Islands

Vessels from the China Maritime Surveillance and the Japan Coast Guard are seen near disputed islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 10, 2013.Vessels from the China Maritime Surveillance and the Japan Coast Guard are seen near disputed islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 10, 2013.
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Vessels from the China Maritime Surveillance and the Japan Coast Guard are seen near disputed islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 10, 2013.
Vessels from the China Maritime Surveillance and the Japan Coast Guard are seen near disputed islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 10, 2013.
VOA News
A Japanese government spokesman says Tokyo has not ruled out stationing officials on an island chain that is also claimed by China, prompting an angry response by Beijing.
 
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said Tuesday in response to a reporter's question that placing government workers on the disputed islands was "one option." He did not elaborate.
 
Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei quickly responded, warning that Japan will have to "accept the consequences" if it "recklessly makes provocative moves."
 
The comments come a day before the one-year anniversary of Japan's purchase of some of the islands from their private Japanese landowner - a move that sparked days of angry anti-Japan protests in China.
 
Since then, China has sent increased regular air and sea patrols near the disputed East China Sea territory, in what some see as an effort to challenge Japan's control of the islands.
 
On Tuesday, Japan formally complained to Beijing over the presence of eight Chinese government ships in the area. The Japanese coastguard says the flotilla is the biggest of its kind since April.
 
On Monday, Japan scrambled fighter jets in the East China Sea after it spotted what it said was an unmanned aircraft flying toward Japan.
 
Some fear that such incidents could lead to an accidental clash between the two Asian powers.

The disputed isles are known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: chlwoyqr from: prc
September 11, 2013 3:04 AM
Senkaku island belongs to japan!!


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
September 10, 2013 8:50 PM
Senkaku ilands were owend by a Japanese citizen from the beginning on. What is the matter the government purchases them? China should stop sending war palnes and war ships around the sea to provoke Japan. You should reflect on what you are doing in the South China sea neglecting the claims from neighboring countries. You should seek diplomatic ways to solve the dispute if you have some claims. Thank you.

In Response

by: KC from: India
September 11, 2013 3:15 AM
What I fail to understand is.. as it has been said that the islands were owned by an individual Jap citizen ; and that he has sold it to japan government. What is the so called " Disputed" element in this ?? why there was no dispute until it was owned by an Individual but became dispute when the national Govt bought it.
these guys are strange


by: Cả Thộn from: Hà Nội
September 10, 2013 4:53 PM
Chinese also placed government workers, invaders on Hoàng Sa island which is being disputed with Việt Nam. Was that China's action considered provocative or aggression ?

In Response

by: SEATO
September 11, 2013 9:09 AM
I totally agree with Cả Thộn . China took the Paracel Islands from Vietnam by force in 1974. In 2012 China illegally set up the Nansha administration on the islands to justify their baseless and extend control over the entire South China Sea despite strong protests from Vietnam.The Senkaku are legally part of Japan and it is only normal for Japan to station officials over them,why should China kick all the rackets about them.By deliberately sending patrol planes and ships into the areas as their attempts to assert sovereignty,are acts of provocations and aggressions.

Peace,stability and prosperity in the region could only be secured if China publicly renounces their ungrounded claims over the Senkaku and the South China Sea and give back all those islands that they have seized illegally to their rightful owners.Only then,China's efforts to be recognised as a World Superpower would be acknowledged when they cease to be a threat to all their neighbours ! Meanwhile,Japan should stand firm and work closely with America,India and ASEAN members to counter threats from China and help preventing more islands and sea areas from being grabbed by a resource-starving China

In Response

by: Kamikaze from: Japan
September 10, 2013 11:27 PM
@Jonathan Huang from Canada, you are still mumbling that Senkaku islands (the name "Diaoyu" had never existed before the probability of natural resources was announced in 1971 by UN) belong to China. When Senkaku islands were very legally incorporated in Japan in 1895, CPR had never existed. Qing had the sovereignty of that area (nowadays, called China mainland); therefore, CPR has no right to claim Senkaku islands. CPR will never become a world superpower. Its bubble economy must collapse sooner or later. Japan will defend itself at any cost from any outrageous attack by CPR.

In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: Canada
September 10, 2013 5:30 PM
Vietnam should give up South China Sea and fully cooperate with china, this will only do good to Vietnamese. China will become a world superpower sooner or later. Against china is stupid.


by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
September 10, 2013 3:53 PM
Diaoyu island belongs to Yilan prefecture, Taiwan.

In Response

by: jim dandy from: icelandia
September 10, 2013 8:32 PM
jonathan why does Japan have the deed then lolol

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