News / Asia

Japan, Philippines Reaffirm Defense Ties

Philippines' President Benigno Aquino shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at the start of their meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 24, 2014.
Philippines' President Benigno Aquino shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at the start of their meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 24, 2014.
VOA News
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's plan to boost his country's military role abroad has received an endorsement from the Philippines.
 
The statement of support was delivered Tuesday at a meeting in Tokyo between Abe and Philippines President Benigno Aquino.
 
The meeting was seen as an expression of solidarity between Manila and Tokyo, which are both involved in territorial disputes with China.
 
Aquino said he welcomes a change to Japan's constitution if it would allow Tokyo to come to the aid of allies in the event of an attack.
 
"We therefore do not view with alarm any proposal to revisit the Japanese constitution if the Japanese people so desire, especially if this enhances Japan's ability to address its international obligations and brings us closer to the attainment of our shared goals of peace, stability and mutual prosperity," said Aquino.
 
Abe's ruling Liberal Democratic Party is trying to reinterpret the constitution to allow for what the prime minister calls "collective self-defense."
 
Beijing has angrily opposed the proposals, saying they represent an upsetting of the post-World War II order and will raise regional tensions.
 
Ties between Manila and Tokyo have drawn closer as their maritime disputes with an increasingly powerful Beijing become more heated.
 
Abe said Tuesday that both he and Aquino reaffirmed the importance of the rule of law in resolving the conflicts.
 
He also said that both countries are "closely coordinating with each other" as the regional situation becomes "increasingly severe."

You May Like

Karzai's Legacy: Missed Opportunities?

Afghanistan's president leaves behind a much different nation than the one he inherited, yet his legacy from 13 years in power is getting mixed reviews More

Video Secret Service Chief Under Fire for White House Security Breach

Julia Pierson faces tough questions from lawmakers after recent intrusion at White House, says: 'It is clear that our security plan was not executed properly' More

Frustrated, Liberian Students Want Ebola Fight Role

Thousands have volunteered to go to counties, rural villages to talk to people in their language about deadly virus More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: jonathan huang from: canada
June 26, 2014 11:22 AM
most of asain countries still gonna keep close ties with China, such as Burma, Laos, Cambordia and Pakistan. And countries such as russia, Thailand, Kasakestan also want to be Chinas friends! Even Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia wont go against China for their own interests!
now look who is stronger! lol

In Response

by: Raselon from: Saudi Arabia
June 27, 2014 1:14 PM
Hahaha. China is desperately seeking other countries to side with her imperialistic ventures. Her ulterior motives through stealing, cheating, forked-tongue negotiations, bullying and coercion are palpable of her lunatic and megalomaniac governance. Canada should start expulsion of Chinese in their country as these people are a scourge of the earth and being low level citizens.


by: johnel c
June 26, 2014 1:22 AM
Clearly, China’s historical basis of claiming territories is immaterial and irrelevant when it comes to international legal aspect, but eventually, it is an effective China’s way to mobilize legal entities that support legitimate claims in the future. China’s inheritance of the sea and its islets as they claim, seemingly serve as a tool that somehow immunized them to create a strong foundation that sustains their assertion. The installation of oil rigs within the EEZ of Vietnam and the resettlement on the islets of the Philippines constitutes the China’s tool to craft a lawful substance of their entitlement for the years to come. Unfortunate to other claiming countries, China at the end stands auspicious of this game of sovereignties… if the other claiming countries do not act accordingly.


by: a sand from: US
June 25, 2014 11:36 AM
Go Japan ! Go.


by: Raselon from: Saudi Arabia
June 25, 2014 2:24 AM
Japan and Philippines together with ASEAN member countries can pursue their collective strength in counteracting the illegal acts of China in the contested territories.

In Response

by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
June 26, 2014 8:58 PM
Apes.....together......strong!.......lol


by: David Bishop from: California
June 25, 2014 1:18 AM
I am glad to see Japan and the Philippines cooperating on their security issues. Other than the US and possibly India, Japan is one of the few nations in region that can check China's Air Force and navy. China does not abide by its agreements. China will not respect UN arbitration to contest any perceived rights it has to the South China Sea. It will not respect the rule of law. However, it will respect advanced weapons such as the type Japan possesses. If the Philippines receives the right weapons from Japan, China may not act so aggressively. At least the US will not be the first and only country pushed to block China's assault on smaller countries.


by: Jim Santos from: Cebu
June 24, 2014 11:08 PM
It is absolutely necessary for Japan and the Philippines to have military cooperation, as well as other countries with disputes against China like Vietnam. Without it, China will exert all the pressure to claim the entire South China Sea as theirs. We shall not agree to this, whatever is ours according to the International Law, if necessary defend it from aggressors particularly China.

In Response

by: Delmonte from: USA
June 25, 2014 12:23 PM
Philippines sued china at UNCLOS but this has no authority to rule on territorial issues except on nags cation issues. USA is not even a signatory of UNclos but it tries to fool idiots like Philippines to use this in propaganda only to demonize China. 8 lawyers are me trying to build evidence to prove that Philippines is in control of the islands by grounding ambushing Chinese fishermen and forcing them to sign document that they were fishing in Philippines islands whereas the facts were the Chinese gave been fishing in the region when there was no nation called Philippines.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Malaysia Struggles to Stop People Joining Jihadi
X
Mahi Ramakrishnan
September 30, 2014 2:16 PM
Malaysian authorities say militant groups like the so-called "Islamic State" have used social media to entice at least three dozen Malaysian Muslims to fight in what they call "jihad" in Syria and Iraq. As Mahi Ramkrishnan reports from Kuala Lumpur, counterterrorism police are deeply worried about what could happen when these militants return home.
Video

Video Malaysia Struggles to Stop People Joining Jihad

Malaysian authorities say militant groups like the so-called "Islamic State" have used social media to entice at least three dozen Malaysian Muslims to fight in what they call "jihad" in Syria and Iraq. As Mahi Ramkrishnan reports from Kuala Lumpur, counterterrorism police are deeply worried about what could happen when these militants return home.
Video

Video Could US Have Done More to Stop Rise of Islamic State?

President Obama says airstrikes against Islamic State militants in Syria will likely continue for some time because, in his words, "there is a cancer that has grown for too long." So what if President Obama had acted sooner in Syria to arm more-moderate opponents of both the Islamic State and the Syrian government? VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns reports from the United Nations.
Video

Video Treasure Hunters Seek 'Hidden Treasure' in Central Kenya

Could a cave in a small village in central Kenya be the site of buried treasure? A rumor of riches, left behind by colonialists, has some residents dreaming of wealth, while others see it as a dangerous hoax. VOA's Gabe Joselow has the story.
Video

Video Iran's Rouhani Skeptical on Syria Strikes

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani expressed skepticism Friday that U.S.-led airstrikes in Iraq and Syria could crush Islamic State militants. From New York, VOA’s Margaret Besheer reports the president was also hopeful that questions about Iran’s nuclear program could be resolved soon.
Video

Video US House Speaker: Congress Should Debate Authorization Against IS

As wave after wave of U.S. airstrikes target Islamic State militants, the speaker of the Republican-controlled House of Representatives says he would be willing to call Congress back into session to debate a formal, broad authorization for the use of military force. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports from Washington, where legislators left town 10 days ago for a seven-week recess.
Video

Video Ebola Patients Find No Treatment at Sierra Leone Holding Center

At a holding facility in Makeni, central Sierra Leone, dozens of sick people sit on the floor in an empty university building. They wait in filthy conditions. It's a 16-hour drive by ambulance to Kailahun Ebola treatment center. Adam Bailes was there and reports on what he says are some of the worst situations he has seen since the beginning of this Ebola outbreak. And he says it appears case numbers may already be far worse than authorities acknowledge.
Video

Video Identifying Bodies Found in Texas Border Region

Thousands of immigrants have died after crossing the border from Mexico into remote areas of the southwestern United States in recent years. Local officials in south Texas alone have found hundreds of unidentified bodies and buried them in mass graves in local cemeteries. Now an anthropologist and her students at Baylor University have been exhuming bodies and looking for clues to identify them. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from Waco, Texas.
Video

Video Ebola Robs Liberians of Chance to Say Good-Bye to Loved Ones

In Liberia, where Ebola has killed more than 1,500 people, authorities have worked hard to convince people to allow specialized burial teams to take away dead bodies. But these safety measures, while necessary, make it hard for people to say good bye to their loved ones. VOA's Anne Look reports on the tragedy from Liberia.
Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.

AppleAndroid