News / Asia

Japan, Philippines Reaffirm Defense Ties

Philippines' President Benigno Aquino shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at the start of their meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 24, 2014.
Philippines' President Benigno Aquino shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at the start of their meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 24, 2014.
VOA News
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's plan to boost his country's military role abroad has received an endorsement from the Philippines.
 
The statement of support was delivered Tuesday at a meeting in Tokyo between Abe and Philippines President Benigno Aquino.
 
The meeting was seen as an expression of solidarity between Manila and Tokyo, which are both involved in territorial disputes with China.
 
Aquino said he welcomes a change to Japan's constitution if it would allow Tokyo to come to the aid of allies in the event of an attack.
 
"We therefore do not view with alarm any proposal to revisit the Japanese constitution if the Japanese people so desire, especially if this enhances Japan's ability to address its international obligations and brings us closer to the attainment of our shared goals of peace, stability and mutual prosperity," said Aquino.
 
Abe's ruling Liberal Democratic Party is trying to reinterpret the constitution to allow for what the prime minister calls "collective self-defense."
 
Beijing has angrily opposed the proposals, saying they represent an upsetting of the post-World War II order and will raise regional tensions.
 
Ties between Manila and Tokyo have drawn closer as their maritime disputes with an increasingly powerful Beijing become more heated.
 
Abe said Tuesday that both he and Aquino reaffirmed the importance of the rule of law in resolving the conflicts.
 
He also said that both countries are "closely coordinating with each other" as the regional situation becomes "increasingly severe."

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Comments
     
by: jonathan huang from: canada
June 26, 2014 11:22 AM
most of asain countries still gonna keep close ties with China, such as Burma, Laos, Cambordia and Pakistan. And countries such as russia, Thailand, Kasakestan also want to be Chinas friends! Even Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia wont go against China for their own interests!
now look who is stronger! lol
In Response

by: Raselon from: Saudi Arabia
June 27, 2014 1:14 PM
Hahaha. China is desperately seeking other countries to side with her imperialistic ventures. Her ulterior motives through stealing, cheating, forked-tongue negotiations, bullying and coercion are palpable of her lunatic and megalomaniac governance. Canada should start expulsion of Chinese in their country as these people are a scourge of the earth and being low level citizens.

by: johnel c
June 26, 2014 1:22 AM
Clearly, China’s historical basis of claiming territories is immaterial and irrelevant when it comes to international legal aspect, but eventually, it is an effective China’s way to mobilize legal entities that support legitimate claims in the future. China’s inheritance of the sea and its islets as they claim, seemingly serve as a tool that somehow immunized them to create a strong foundation that sustains their assertion. The installation of oil rigs within the EEZ of Vietnam and the resettlement on the islets of the Philippines constitutes the China’s tool to craft a lawful substance of their entitlement for the years to come. Unfortunate to other claiming countries, China at the end stands auspicious of this game of sovereignties… if the other claiming countries do not act accordingly.

by: a sand from: US
June 25, 2014 11:36 AM
Go Japan ! Go.

by: Raselon from: Saudi Arabia
June 25, 2014 2:24 AM
Japan and Philippines together with ASEAN member countries can pursue their collective strength in counteracting the illegal acts of China in the contested territories.
In Response

by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
June 26, 2014 8:58 PM
Apes.....together......strong!.......lol

by: David Bishop from: California
June 25, 2014 1:18 AM
I am glad to see Japan and the Philippines cooperating on their security issues. Other than the US and possibly India, Japan is one of the few nations in region that can check China's Air Force and navy. China does not abide by its agreements. China will not respect UN arbitration to contest any perceived rights it has to the South China Sea. It will not respect the rule of law. However, it will respect advanced weapons such as the type Japan possesses. If the Philippines receives the right weapons from Japan, China may not act so aggressively. At least the US will not be the first and only country pushed to block China's assault on smaller countries.

by: Jim Santos from: Cebu
June 24, 2014 11:08 PM
It is absolutely necessary for Japan and the Philippines to have military cooperation, as well as other countries with disputes against China like Vietnam. Without it, China will exert all the pressure to claim the entire South China Sea as theirs. We shall not agree to this, whatever is ours according to the International Law, if necessary defend it from aggressors particularly China.
In Response

by: Delmonte from: USA
June 25, 2014 12:23 PM
Philippines sued china at UNCLOS but this has no authority to rule on territorial issues except on nags cation issues. USA is not even a signatory of UNclos but it tries to fool idiots like Philippines to use this in propaganda only to demonize China. 8 lawyers are me trying to build evidence to prove that Philippines is in control of the islands by grounding ambushing Chinese fishermen and forcing them to sign document that they were fishing in Philippines islands whereas the facts were the Chinese gave been fishing in the region when there was no nation called Philippines.

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