News / Asia

Japan, Philippines Reaffirm Defense Ties

Philippines' President Benigno Aquino shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at the start of their meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 24, 2014.
Philippines' President Benigno Aquino shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at the start of their meeting at the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 24, 2014.
VOA News
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's plan to boost his country's military role abroad has received an endorsement from the Philippines.
 
The statement of support was delivered Tuesday at a meeting in Tokyo between Abe and Philippines President Benigno Aquino.
 
The meeting was seen as an expression of solidarity between Manila and Tokyo, which are both involved in territorial disputes with China.
 
Aquino said he welcomes a change to Japan's constitution if it would allow Tokyo to come to the aid of allies in the event of an attack.
 
"We therefore do not view with alarm any proposal to revisit the Japanese constitution if the Japanese people so desire, especially if this enhances Japan's ability to address its international obligations and brings us closer to the attainment of our shared goals of peace, stability and mutual prosperity," said Aquino.
 
Abe's ruling Liberal Democratic Party is trying to reinterpret the constitution to allow for what the prime minister calls "collective self-defense."
 
Beijing has angrily opposed the proposals, saying they represent an upsetting of the post-World War II order and will raise regional tensions.
 
Ties between Manila and Tokyo have drawn closer as their maritime disputes with an increasingly powerful Beijing become more heated.
 
Abe said Tuesday that both he and Aquino reaffirmed the importance of the rule of law in resolving the conflicts.
 
He also said that both countries are "closely coordinating with each other" as the regional situation becomes "increasingly severe."

You May Like

How to Safeguard Your Mobile Privacy

As the digital world becomes more mobile, so too do concerns about eroding privacy and increased hacking More

'Desert Dancer' Chronicles Iranian Underground Dance Troupe

Film by Richard Raymond is based on true story of Afshin Ghaffarian and his friends More

Obesity Poses Complex Problem

Professor warns of obesity’s worldwide health impact More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: jonathan huang from: canada
June 26, 2014 11:22 AM
most of asain countries still gonna keep close ties with China, such as Burma, Laos, Cambordia and Pakistan. And countries such as russia, Thailand, Kasakestan also want to be Chinas friends! Even Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia wont go against China for their own interests!
now look who is stronger! lol
In Response

by: Raselon from: Saudi Arabia
June 27, 2014 1:14 PM
Hahaha. China is desperately seeking other countries to side with her imperialistic ventures. Her ulterior motives through stealing, cheating, forked-tongue negotiations, bullying and coercion are palpable of her lunatic and megalomaniac governance. Canada should start expulsion of Chinese in their country as these people are a scourge of the earth and being low level citizens.

by: johnel c
June 26, 2014 1:22 AM
Clearly, China’s historical basis of claiming territories is immaterial and irrelevant when it comes to international legal aspect, but eventually, it is an effective China’s way to mobilize legal entities that support legitimate claims in the future. China’s inheritance of the sea and its islets as they claim, seemingly serve as a tool that somehow immunized them to create a strong foundation that sustains their assertion. The installation of oil rigs within the EEZ of Vietnam and the resettlement on the islets of the Philippines constitutes the China’s tool to craft a lawful substance of their entitlement for the years to come. Unfortunate to other claiming countries, China at the end stands auspicious of this game of sovereignties… if the other claiming countries do not act accordingly.

by: a sand from: US
June 25, 2014 11:36 AM
Go Japan ! Go.

by: Raselon from: Saudi Arabia
June 25, 2014 2:24 AM
Japan and Philippines together with ASEAN member countries can pursue their collective strength in counteracting the illegal acts of China in the contested territories.
In Response

by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
June 26, 2014 8:58 PM
Apes.....together......strong!.......lol

by: David Bishop from: California
June 25, 2014 1:18 AM
I am glad to see Japan and the Philippines cooperating on their security issues. Other than the US and possibly India, Japan is one of the few nations in region that can check China's Air Force and navy. China does not abide by its agreements. China will not respect UN arbitration to contest any perceived rights it has to the South China Sea. It will not respect the rule of law. However, it will respect advanced weapons such as the type Japan possesses. If the Philippines receives the right weapons from Japan, China may not act so aggressively. At least the US will not be the first and only country pushed to block China's assault on smaller countries.

by: Jim Santos from: Cebu
June 24, 2014 11:08 PM
It is absolutely necessary for Japan and the Philippines to have military cooperation, as well as other countries with disputes against China like Vietnam. Without it, China will exert all the pressure to claim the entire South China Sea as theirs. We shall not agree to this, whatever is ours according to the International Law, if necessary defend it from aggressors particularly China.
In Response

by: Delmonte from: USA
June 25, 2014 12:23 PM
Philippines sued china at UNCLOS but this has no authority to rule on territorial issues except on nags cation issues. USA is not even a signatory of UNclos but it tries to fool idiots like Philippines to use this in propaganda only to demonize China. 8 lawyers are me trying to build evidence to prove that Philippines is in control of the islands by grounding ambushing Chinese fishermen and forcing them to sign document that they were fishing in Philippines islands whereas the facts were the Chinese gave been fishing in the region when there was no nation called Philippines.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam Wari
X
Katherine Gypson
May 25, 2015 1:32 AM
For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
Video

Video Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam War

For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
Video

Video Female American Soldiers: Healing Through Filmmaking

According to the United States Defense Department, there are more than 200-thousand women serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.  Like their male counterparts, females have experiences that can be very traumatic.  VOA's Bernard Shusman tells us about a program that is helping some American women in the military heal through filmmaking.
Video

Video Iowa Family's Sacrifice Shaped US Military Service for Generations

Few places in America have experienced war like Waterloo. This small town in the Midwest state of Iowa became famous during World War II not for what it accomplished, but what it lost. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, the legacy of one family’s sacrifice is still a reminder today of the real cost of war for all families on the homefront.
Video

Video On Film: How Dance Defies Iran's Political Oppression

'Desert Dancer' by filmmaker Richard Raymond is based on the true story of a group of young Iranians, who form an underground dance troupe in the Islamic Republic of Iran. This is the latest in a genre of films that focus on dance as a form of freedom of expression against political oppression and social injustice. VOA’s Penelope Poulou has more.
Video

Video Turkey's Ruling Party Trying to Lure Voters in Opposition Stronghold

Turkey’s AK (Justice and Development) Party is seeking a fourth successive general election victory, with the goal of securing two-thirds of the seats in Parliament to rewrite the constitution and change the country's parliamentary system into a presidential one. To achieve that, the party will need to win seats in opposition strongholds like the western city of Izmir. Dorian Jones reports.
Video

Video Millions Flock to Ethiopia Polls

Millions of Ethiopians cast their votes Sunday in the first national election since the 2012 death of longtime leader Meles Zenawi. Mr. Meles' party, the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front, is almost certain of victory again. VOA's Anita Powell reports from Addis Ababa.
Video

Video Scientists Testing Space Propulsion by Light

Can the sun - the heart of our solar system - power a spacecraft to the edge of our solar system? The answer may come from a just-launched small satellite designed to test the efficiency of solar sail propulsion. Once deployed, its large sail will catch the so-called solar wind and slowly reach what scientists hope to be substantial speed. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video FIFA Trains Somali Referees

As stability returns to the once lawless nation of Somalia, the world football governing body, FIFA, is helping to rebuild the country’s sport sector by training referees as well as its young footballers. Abdulaziz Billow has more from Mogadishu.
Video

Video With US Child Obesity Rates on the Rise, Program Promotes Health Eating

In its fifth year, FoodCorps puts more than 180 young Americans into 500 schools across the United States, where they focus on teaching students about nutrition, engaging them with hands-on activities, and improving their access to healthy foods whether in the cafeteria or the greater community. Aru Pande has more.
Video

Video Virginia Neighborhood Draws People to Nostalgic Main Street

In the U.S., people used to grow up in small towns with a main street lined by family-owned shops and restaurants. Today, however, many main streets are worn down and empty because shoppers have been lured away by shopping malls. But in the Del Ray neighborhood of Alexandria, Virginia, main street is thriving. VOA’s Deborah Block reports it has a nostalgic feel with its small restaurants and unique stores.

VOA Blogs