News / Asia

Japan Condemns China's Use of Weapons-Targeting Radar

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) and Finance Minister Taro Aso (L) show their sour faces at the Upper House's plenary session at the National Diet in Tokyo, February 6, 2013.
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) and Finance Minister Taro Aso (L) show their sour faces at the Upper House's plenary session at the National Diet in Tokyo, February 6, 2013.
VOA News
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says it is "extremely regrettable" that a Chinese warship locked its pre-firing radar on a Japanese navy boat near disputed islands last week.

Speaking to a parliamentary session Wednesday, Abe called the move "dangerous." He said it could lead to an accidental clash, and he warned China against escalating the situation further.

"At a time when it seemed there are signs of improvement towards increasing talks between Japan and China, having this sort of one-sided provocative action taken by the Chinese is extremely regrettable," said Abe.

Tokyo has lodged an official protest with Beijing over the January 30 incident, the latest in a series of dangerous escalations in their long-running dispute over ownership of a group of East China Sea islands.

On Tuesday, Japan's defense ministry said it confirmed that the Chinese navy frigate aimed its weapons-targeting radar at the Japanese vessel. It also said a Japanese military helicopter was targeted with similar radar earlier last month.

Since late last year, China has regularly sent government ships to patrol the Japanese-administered islands, in what observers say is an effort to establish de facto control of the area. Both sides also have scrambled fighter jets to the islands, raising fears of an all-out military conflict.

China-Japan ties sank to their lowest level in years last September, after Tokyo purchased some of the islands from their private Japanese landowner. The move sparked days of angry protests in China. It also damaged trade ties between Asia's two largest economies.

The situation has remained tense, with government ships from both sides regularly exchanging warnings in the disputed waters. But both sides have hinted in recent days that diplomacy, and not military conflict, is the best way to resolve the issue.

Prime Minister Abe, who is known for his hawkish and nationalistic views, last month said he would consider a summit with China to help ease tensions surrounding the island dispute. Senior Chinese officials welcomed the offer, although no meeting has been planned.

The uninhabited islands, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, are surrounded by rich fishing grounds and possibly by energy deposits. They have a long history of causing tensions between China and Japan.

Japan annexed the islets in the late 19th century. China claimed sovereignty over the archipelago in 1971, saying ancient maps show it has been Chinese territory for centuries.

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by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
February 08, 2013 6:15 PM
What China should do is to prove and show what its warship did and what did not to Japanese navy boat and airplane with clear evidence. That is all.

by: Antichina from: PH
February 07, 2013 8:06 PM
do something before it's too late, it's just the beginning of a new fascist china, dont let it becomes a real one

by: Sun from: WH
February 07, 2013 2:15 AM
Having seen the comments below the report,I feel a little surprised and nervous.We all support one universal authority that we should have a peaceful world.But it's true that Jap had killed so many Chinese however u recognize or not.So u should give Chinese your apologize about that.Also,when the US in the force of currency,Chinese gave a lot help to u which Japan can't give.Right?

by: Nigeshabi from: Canada
February 07, 2013 1:01 AM
"locked its pre-firing radar on a Japanese navy boat" is only a warning when China's boats feel threatened by Japanese. Japanese warship always followed and inspected Chinese ships and even took some photos of Chinese ships. China usually doesn't lock its radar on foreign ships, except Japanese. Why China only locked Radar on Japanese ships? Japan unilaterally nationalize Dioayu/Senkaku islands and violate WWII declarations to return these islands to China (at least Japan should negotiate with China. Japanese should reflect what they have done in the past hundreds year, especially in WWII before they blame others. From history and international law, Diaoyu islands/Senkaku is more related to Taiwan and China and a territory of China. You can check Internet or go to library to get more information about these islands.

by: johnny from: US
February 06, 2013 9:16 PM
japanese worship war criminals and deny war crimes such as sex slaves. What kind nation is Japan? Where is US leadship?

by: Bill from: Australia
February 06, 2013 7:39 PM
Meh, using a radar, targeting or otherwise, is hardly anything to write home about. A US drone takes out a wedding in a Pakistani village and that hardly makes the news.

by: UnderNoMake from: Japan
February 06, 2013 6:47 PM
To JpganaPsy,

What is the importance in your opinion? You mean you want to be back to a Chinese subject state again? If so, why not?
Two of you really want to hysterically dwell on the past and provoke Japan, even though economically you could not stand on your own two feet without Japan. Anyway, please get along with China now and forever. We are getting along with Taiwan, other ASEAN countries, and US.

by: Frank from: Orange County, USA
February 06, 2013 6:42 PM
Does PRC really want to start a war against Japan? Knock-on is more than provocation. We have to give Chinese a lesson about International Law. All peace-loving countries should ally to get rid of greedy, unethical, lawless, air-polluted PRC from this world. Or, shall we wait until air pollution destructs China? All foreigners, let's leave China before it becomes an uninhabitable country.
In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
February 08, 2013 6:24 PM
@ jonathan huang: May I ask, "Are you a peace-loving person?" I am sure you are a peace-loving person. Me too.
In Response

by: chihuahua from: santa clara
February 07, 2013 11:32 PM
@ jonathan huang: Yes, US just never stopped fighting wars in other countries including faked excuses of invasion....this is and will continue because of those chicom keeps stealing, faking, copying, lying, abusing on property of other countries around the world.
you CAN NOT claim entire south china sea or east china sea as yours.
In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
February 07, 2013 2:56 AM
Everyone laughed when US and Jap said they are peace-loving countries. LOL US just never stopped fighting wars in other countries including faked excuses of invasion. Jap is still worshipping those WWII class-A war criminals in a shrine.

by: JpganaPsy from: KL
February 06, 2013 11:33 AM
HA! Everyone just seems to forget China already denoted its first Atomic bomb in 1969. Now after 43 years, North Korea didn't even have a real atomic bomb but Japan is already scared like shit seeking his brother to protect him by patriotic missiles. China will not be afraid of having a war with anyone....WWII had a big psychotic effect on it and if ant nation dares provoke and fight China well, it will fight back as if the enemy is the evil aliens from outer space...what I mean is that it will deploy all kinds of weapon.....hydrogen bomb,satellite killers, suicide bombers and etc....to destroy the aliens. So, who wants to be the first?
In Response

by: Wong from: USA
February 06, 2013 8:18 PM
Idiot, how many times chinese military ships got block by radar that they don't know???

Chinese carrier can be destroyed in 1/2 hour.

I can't imagine what if china is really strong!

by: Grin Olsson from: Alaska, USA
February 06, 2013 7:19 AM
China is well aware that the results of World War 2 were achieved solely by the United States and United States aid where Japan was defeated and came under the American defense umbrella as a result of their loss. Those islands were recognized as Japanese and returned to Japan after the war. It is quite evident that China has built up its navy, air force, and other armed forces in the belief that it can intimidate and threaten force to secure oceanic territory that it has or may have claimed in the past 1,000 years. China is literally threatening to attack the United States by proxy using Japan as the instrumentality because the world knows Japan's defenses are totally controlled by the victors of WW2 which is the United States.
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