News / Asia

    US, Japan Protest China Air Defense Zone

    Japanese Coast Guard vessels sail near a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan, Aug. 18, 2013.
    Japanese Coast Guard vessels sail near a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan, Aug. 18, 2013.
    VOA News
    The United States has voiced its "strong concern" to China over threats from Beijing to enforce its claims to a set of disputed Pacific islands controlled by Japan but claimed by the People's Republic.
     
    The White House, State Department and Pentagon all issued statements late Saturday, hours after Beijing threatened to take "defensive emergency measures" against aircraft entering its newly-proclaimed air defense zone. The Chinese edict called on all aircraft to identify themselves before entering the zone, and to obey all orders from Beijing.
     
    The White House called the threat an escalatory development," while Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called it "a destabilizing attempt to alter the status quo" in the East China Sea. Hagel also said the United States has no plans to change how it conducts military operations in the region. 
     
    The islands, known as Senkaku in Japan and Daioyu in China, are uninhabited, but surrounded by rich fishing grounds and potential energy deposits.
     
    Earlier Saturday, Japan lodged a strong protest with Beijing that called establishment of the zone "totally unacceptable." Senior Japanese diplomat Junichi Ihara also criticized China for escalating bilateral tensions over the islands.
                                                                                                                           
    In the Chinese statement, which appeared Saturday on a defense ministry website, Beijing said the new rules were effective immediately.
     
    After months of escalating tensions, Japan scrambled fighter jets earlier this month over the East China Sea, after it spotted what it said was an unmanned aircraft flying toward Japan.
     
    Japan annexed the islets in the late 19th century. China claimed sovereignty over the archipelago in 1971, saying ancient maps show it has been Chinese territory for centuries.
     
    The festering China-Japan dispute is one of several maritime controversies pitting China against several Southeast Asian nations, including the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei and Malaysia.
     
    Beijing has indicated a willingness to negotiate the disputes, but has so far rejected calls for multilateral talks. It has sought separate negotiations with each country.
     
    Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

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    Comments page of 3
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    by: Forrest.Tu from: China
    November 26, 2013 10:20 AM
    China doesn't want to see those "secret reconnaissance operations " done by US and Japan in the area any longer, that's why ADIZ was established.

    US and Japan still want to go on their "secret reconnaissance operations ", that's why they keep blabla these days.

    That's it.

    by: Anonymous from: Earth
    November 26, 2013 2:23 AM
    I think we all need to understand that the PRC and PLA are two separate organizations with no apparent control over one another. No one outside either club knows what really goes on in these two organizations. But this also could be an intentional delay tactic for China to build up its economy and military, as inconsistencies are more confusing in a two-rule system than a one-rule system. Either-or it is both run by the CCP.

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    November 25, 2013 10:26 PM
    To weiwei, Do not you think we should think highly of keeping status quo when each claim differs? Do not you think we should take a next step after some notice and agreements especially when the step is risky to bring about military conflict?

    It is true Senkaku or Daiou islands had been drawn in both maps of China and Japan before the Sino‐Japanese War (of 1894‐95). It also may be true Japan annexted the islands after its win of the war. Eventhough without endorsement of formal peace treaty, annexation is acknowledged as justifiable because it was conducted after the confirmation of no sign of Chinese substantial sovereignty on the islands and no claim from China. It was Japanese administration which actually land and controled the islands first. You China should respect status quo and should make efforts to draw some compromise, if you want, from Japan regarding this territorial dipute diplomatically and patiently not military and provocativelly. Thank you.
    In Response

    by: Weiwei from: beijing
    November 26, 2013 10:32 AM
    I only want to ask you, who did not keep the status quo firstly and continuously? Who PLAYED ridiculously the so called "nationalization" of "Diaoyu" Island? It is just the Japanese government.

    by: Weiwei from: beijing
    November 25, 2013 9:49 AM
    I don't understand why so many Americans want to teach China a lesson. It seems me ridiculous.
    You should have known that, it is Japanese Government, which through the so called "eminent domain" of Diaoyu Island, had made the tensions around the island more and more escalating. Could YOU AMERICANS imagine, when you American military forces trilling at the public sea area normaly, and then the japanese government without invitation break into it offensive with its warship? In normal ordinary life it would be also unimagined. I think so.
    By the way, @Double Standards: thanks for your reply, but I could not agree with you.

    by: Anonymous
    November 25, 2013 2:59 AM
    Can VOA tell the world that US and Japan did declare such air defense zones long before China did?

    by: Samurai from: Japan
    November 25, 2013 2:33 AM
    What Chinese government (PRC) is doing is just the same as what a gangster does. PRC envies the garden of its neighbor's (Japanese) house and sets a fence surrounding this garden, insisting that a mad dog should bite anybody who enters the surrounded area. We should give the outlaw PRC lessons of ethics and manners.

    by: Weiwei from: beijing
    November 25, 2013 2:15 AM
    I think differently with you Americans. We should respect the historical fact that the island is under chinese government control untill recently since the japanese have unlawfull and secretly occupied it with the connivance of USA. We should resolve the controversy in acordance with international law and negotiations. It is my opinion.
    In Response

    by: Double Standards
    November 25, 2013 6:20 AM
    @Weiwei: The islets have never been under Chinese administration.China is well known for forgery,fabricating facts and evidence.China was not a sea-faring nation,but China still claims most of South China Sea.You said why both sides don't try to resolve the matter in accordance to international laws and negotiations,are you playing dumb or simply ignorant?China has never respected laws and orders in any way.China often deliberately encroaches into their neighbours' territories,bringing about a dispute,and then force negotiation on its own terms and conditions at China's advantage.

    China has never been a law-abiding country.You see,China invaded Tibet, took the Paracel Islands from Vietnam, Scarborough shoal from the Philippines by force, and still shamelessly claim them to be inseparable parts of China.China is becoming increasingly aggressive because it knows for a fact that noone likes war. However, China doesn't mind waging war to achieve its goal even that would sacrifice half of its population as some of its generals often suggested.An evil empire like China does not know its limits.By compromising we only make China more arrogant and belligerant.Splitting the area in halves as some suggested?? Why ? Would China split the Paracel Islands in halves and share them with the Vietnamese? No. Hold your ground and fight back is the only way!

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    November 24, 2013 8:42 PM
    "The Chinese edict called on all aircraft to identify themselves before entering the zone, and to obey all orders from Beijing."

    This call of China is definately abrupting and unilateral, so needless to say, it does not work on matters over international disputes. It also draws no sympathy for China from third countries. This kind of unilateral and threatening measures of China have been taken in other disputed regions against south Asian countries boosting only hatred to China. It is a pity that China is producing opponents by its arbitrary intents. China (and probably also Japan) should learn to seak how to negotiate and bring mutual agreements patiently. Thank you.

    by: Tim from: Canberra, Australia
    November 24, 2013 7:52 PM
    I can’t see US saying anything when Jap extended its ADIZ westward, only 130 km from the coast of mainland China at its closest point in May 2013. Can you?

    by: Nick from: United States
    November 24, 2013 4:37 PM
    This does not seem like an issue America needs to manage. We know in modern society, the globe has no set boundaries. Take for instance Israel, but keep in mind how hard the Israelis fight to keep their land. If neither is willing to budge, then the only solutions are a partition or a war. I couldn't blame either for their coming decision, just like I would not blame my country, America, for war, if Mexico tried at some point taking Texas back.
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