News / Asia

Japan Spots Chinese Ships Near Contested Islands

A Chinese marine surveillance ship cruises in waters about 28 km (17 miles) northwest of one of the disputed islands called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this handout photo released by Japan Coast Guard's 11th Regional Co
A Chinese marine surveillance ship cruises in waters about 28 km (17 miles) northwest of one of the disputed islands called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this handout photo released by Japan Coast Guard's 11th Regional Co
VOA News
Japan says four Chinese government ships entered waters near contested Tokyo-controlled islands in the East China Sea, as a territorial dispute between the two Asian giants drags on.

Japan's Coast Guard said the Chinese surveillance vessels spent several hours within a 22-kilometer zone surrounding the islands Thursday. It said this is the first time in three weeks that Chinese ships have entered the zone, which Japan considers its territory.

The move prompted a "strong protest" by Japan's foreign ministry. China's foreign ministry shot back, saying the ships were conducting "routine patrols" to "safeguard the country's sovereignty."

Secret talks

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Both sides held secret talks last week in Shanghai to resolve the dispute over the islands, which lie in rich fishing grounds and are surrounded by potential energy deposits.

Japanese media reported Thursday that preparations are being made for another round of talks next week to resolve the stand-off.

Meanwhile, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell discussed the feud Thursday in Tokyo with senior Japanese officials.

"We talked about the importance of ensuring that relations between Japan and China are restored and improved and that is in the best interest of not just the peoples of both countries, but of everyone in the Asia Pacific, including the United States."

Last month Campbell said the dispute over the islands, known in Japan as Senkaku and in China as Diaoyu, "clearly" falls within the scope of the U.S.-Japan security treaty that obliges Washington to come to the aid of Tokyo if attacked.

Bias

Many in Beijing are unhappy with what they see as Washington's partiality regarding the sovereignty of the islands, despite U.S. insistence that it does not take sides in the dispute.

Earlier this week, Beijing apparently rejected efforts by a U.S. diplomatic delegation to mediate the dispute. China's official Xinhua news agency said Vice Premier Li Keqiang stressed China's "solemn stance" on the issue during Tuesday meetings with former White House National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley, ex-deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, and others.

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Comments
     
by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
October 25, 2012 6:08 PM
Hongkongners Taiwanese are not communist, however all Chinese around the world support CCP's claim of Diaoyu island and want our motherland stronger and richer!
Japanese are still worshipping those class A war criminals in a shrine, what a sick country!

by: vera from: usa
October 25, 2012 1:48 PM
To all communist chinese...you must understand that Senkaku islands belong to Japan,. Do not claim our lands or islands your as you did in TIbet or South china sea. Only scumbag commie like you do that in human history. So shut up and behave so we can have world peace, else, we'll kick you RED monkey derriere as we did in the past. Got the message ?!

by: Samurai from: Japan
October 25, 2012 7:14 AM
Communist Chinese government is still struggling to provoke Japan. Most of common Chinese people are against such provocative behavior against Japan. It is incredible that Chinese radical guys want to fight with Japan. Do they really believe that Chinese untrained fleet can beat Japanese traditional well-trained navy? Remember Sino-Japan Japan Sea war, where Chinese fleet was completely beaten by Japanese fleet.
In Response

by: getty from: Indonesia
October 28, 2012 10:15 AM
Prime minister (Wen Jiabao)'s relatives control assets of at least $2.7 billion----Oh, poor Chinese people! They are all uninformed that Communist leaders are all habitual criminals of corruption. Instead, Chinese people are puppets in the hands of Communist leaders, bullying neighboring south east countries and provoking Japan. Chinese people should regain their own wealth, freedom, and even human rights and live peacefully along with people of neighboring countries.
In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
October 25, 2012 6:12 PM
"Most of common Chinese people are against such provocative behavior against Japan."
Its funny, unless you are blind. Dont you see how many Chinese went to street to protest Japan? And how fast the drop of selling of Japanese cars in China. 60% in a Month. Isn't that enough proof how badly Chinese hate Japanese?
In Response

by: Landgrabber
October 25, 2012 1:03 PM
Nobody knows about Japan stealing the Senkaku from China in 1895,but it was obvious that China stole the Paracel Islands from South Vietnam in 1974.Japan is weak like Vietnam.If China goes to war again,it is the poor Chinese that will lose their loved ones,and those high ranking officials in Beijing will laugh their socks off.Didn't China steal Inner Mongolia from Mongolia? Shouldn't you give it back to Mongolia then?
In Response

by: DiaoYu Island China from: China
October 25, 2012 9:09 AM
Yes, Mr. Samurai. Japan stole the island from China after the Sina-Japan in 1895. You should have given us back after the second the World War. All the disputes in East Asia related to Japan's invasion. We Chinese do not want a war, but we are not afraid of war imposed on us.

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