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Jimmy Carter Calls for Stop in Abuse Against Women

Jimmy Carter Issues 'Call to Action' to Stop Abuse Against Womeni
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Kane Farabaugh
March 29, 2014 5:23 PM
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter calls abuse of women the most serious human rights issue facing the world today. In an interview with VOA's Kane Farabaugh, and in his new book "A Call to Action," the former president outlines the seriousness of the abuse both globally and in the United States. Human rights organizations and activists hope his attention to the issue will give them a boost in fighting the problem.

VIDEO: Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter calls abuse of women the most serious human rights issue facing the world today.

Kane Farabaugh
The World Health Organization reports one in three women around the world will experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime.

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter calls abuse of women the most serious human rights issue facing the world today. In an interview with VOA, and in his new book A Call to Action, he outlines the seriousness of the abuse — both globally and in the United States. Human rights organizations and activists hope his attention to the issue will give them a boost in fighting the problem.

Former President Carter learned about these abuses through the global work of the Atlanta-based Carter Center, where abuse of women was the focus of a 2013 human rights conference.

"The most serious problem is murder of baby girls by their parents. And the abortion of the girl fetus if the parents find out she's going to be female," Carter said.

"We've been dealing with 79 different countries, and as I've been in those foreign countries, and also throughout the United States, I've seen the tangible examples of how horribly women and girls are treated, much worse than anyone knows," he added.
 
His research into the scope and seriousness of abuse against women culminated in his 28th book, A Call to Action, which explores the culture and causes of the abuse. He says the United States is not immune to the problem.
 
"One of the worst places in America for sexual abuse or rape is on the great university campuses," he said. "On university campuses, about one out of four women are sexually assaulted while she is in college. About four percent, one in 25, ever reports a rape when it's committed."

But for Elizabeth Powley of the Chicago-based non-profit Heartland Alliance, there is no shortage of heartache and pain in the stories she hears from abroad.

"Violence against women is a transnational issue, it's not an issue just for women overseas," said Powley, who has spent time working with women in earthquake-ravaged Haiti.
 
"Simply the lack of street lighting at night [in Haiti] made it extremely dangerous for them to leave their homes, to leave their tents at night to go out in search of water or whatever it was they needed to take care of their family," she said. "And we saw incidents of rape and violence skyrocket in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake."

She views President Carter as an ally in the fight against the abuse of women, and she said his voice in the issue helps combat long held views and attitudes, particularly with men.
 
"Gender based violence won't be solved if only women want to solve it, so he brings an extremely important voice to the conversation," said Powley.
 
She said one of the best ways to curb the growing violence is by educating boys and young men to respect women, leading to better decision-making when they become adults.

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by: Caesar J. B. Squitti from: Thunder Bay
April 09, 2014 10:49 PM
Women and girls...? What about boys and men ?

Sorry Mr. Carter you have fallen victim to a half-truth of the 2nd type, discovered in Thunder Bay, in 1989.

When a bomb drops, it does not discriminate against boys ?

Anyway, this shows how the devil deceived Eve about Truth....it can lie.

based on the book, "The LIGHT; The Rainbow of Truths..."


by: Kathy from: anywhere america
March 31, 2014 5:58 AM
Although he is an outstanding man for what he is doing for women, he needs to realize, that it just starts with basic respect for women. Without that his plight will go nowhere.


by: Not Again from: Canada
March 30, 2014 9:19 PM
It is interesting to see a " past world leader?" that after 70+ years has finally realized, that the sit of women around the world is terrible. It does not surprise me, for he has a very selective narrow view of the World. The plight of women, especially the fact that in many countries they are treated as property, has been ongoing for many milenia. Ignorance of the situation is shamefull; the issue of the emacipation of women, is the last frontier of gross mass abuse and denial of rights, and in many cases outright slavery. The fact that sanctions have not been brought about against the worst abusers, demonstrates most clearly, that even in the developed world, women's issues take a back seat to trade deals and globalization, which in many countries ties women to sewing machines under the most extreme work conditions, for peanuts a day. If all Western gvmts were progressive, and sensitive to the plight of women, foreign aid and trade would be based on clear standards, with maximum penalties against those states that are the worst transgressors against women. Is there one statesman/ woman? that has the courage necessary to ensure women are emancipated around the world, the answer is no, due to the observed negative outcome. And for Mr. Carter to have been so ignorant, about the plight of women, for such a long time is just amazing. Let us hope that maybe the current administration will take a stronger stand, and push for the absolute emancipation of women, in the many states around the world, were women are still treated as property, and their basic human rights denied. This could be the one issue that raises the moral standing, in foreign policy, high above all the other already failed/failing issues. Let us hope change will take place for the better of just over 1/2 of humanity.


by: Вася
March 30, 2014 7:00 PM
The work being done by Jimmy Carter is of the first importance. I would like to express my gratitude.


by: Enok Habte from: Dallas, Texas, USA
March 30, 2014 6:18 AM
Jimmy Carter was given the nobel prize in 2002. It was a wonderful compensation, and a justified award. Thank you President Carter for making the world a better place.

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