News / Africa

Kenya Election Cheers Investors, But Worries Remain

Investors walk out of the Nairobi Stock Exchange in Kenya's capital Nairobi, Mar. 4, 2010.
Investors walk out of the Nairobi Stock Exchange in Kenya's capital Nairobi, Mar. 4, 2010.
Reuters
Kenya's peaceful election has given investors an added impetus to buy assets in East Africa's biggest economy, but a legal challenge to the result and the possible international trial of the winner could dampen enthusiasm.

Kenya, like many other frontier markets, is enjoying strong growth, with its rising consumer class and high bond yields attracting international investors.

Kenya's stock market hit four-and-a-half year highs and the shilling surged to four-month highs after the declaration last weekend of Uhuru Kenyatta as president, without the 2008 post-election violence which left 1,200 dead.

The election has given many the confidence that recent gains can be sustained.

"There is a sigh of relief, it's not the nightmare that everyone feared," said Daniel Broby, chief investment officer of frontier fund manager Silk Invest, who holds Kenyan assets.

Kenyatta won slightly over 50% of the more than 12.3 million votes cast, so avoiding the need for a second round.

"It was a pretty close shave, but at the end of the day, it's nothing to get too worked up about - the fear was that there would not be a majority," Broby added.

Kenya is one of only two African countries - along with Nigeria - in the benchmark MSCI frontier stock market index. Kenya is the second-best performer in the index this year, outpacing most other markets and lagging only the United Arab Emirates.

The stock market is the largest in East Africa and is seen as an investment hub for the region. Foreign participation has been increasing and is now more than 50%.
        
Stocks rally

Kenyan stocks rallied 13% this year even before Kenyatta's victory, and have added another 3% this week.

Popular stocks include East African Breweries, up 23% this year, telecom group Safaricom, also up 23%, and Kenya Commercial Bank, up 40%, all of which offer exposure to the country's booming consumer demand.

Kenya also has a relatively well-developed local bond market and experts say a planned Eurobond is likely to be popular with investors who have snapped up bonds from other African countries such as Zambia and Nigeria.

In terms of policy direction, investors say little differentiates Kenyatta from his defeated rival Raila Odinga. They have been further encouraged by the central bank's success in keeping the currency steady.

"The election result is not likely to lead to a major shift of economic policy," said Graham Stock, strategist at frontier fund manager Insparo. "The currency has been very stable, there is no reason to think that won't continue."

Economic activity is expected to expand, as businesses initiate projects that were on hold before the election. GDP growth is seen as much as 6% this year.

Investors have been reassured by a reduction in political risk since the introduction of a new constitution in 2010, which included the reform of the judiciary and plans for a devolved system of government.

Market less bullish
        
But bond investors are less bullish, noting that Kenyan debt has already enjoyed a strong rally.

"A year ago when 10-year yields were close to 20% it was attractive but now it's down to 9% the yield is not compelling, especially with political uncertainty hanging over,'' said Stuart Culverhouse, chief economist at broker Exotix.

Investors point to two sources of uncertainty - Odinga's challenge to the election result, and the International Criminal Court's indictment of Kenyatta.

Odinga's Coalition for Reforms and Democracy plans to seek the nullification of the election result on grounds that Kenyatta's votes had been increased illegally.

The risk is of subsequent violence should Odinga lose the case, which may be heard in the Supreme Court in the next couple of weeks. That stirs memories of December 2007 when President Mwai Kibaki was declared the winner, but Odinga said the vote was rigged.

Riots in early 2008 plunged Kenya into weeks of tribal bloodshed, scaring off investment. Under a power-sharing deal brokered to end the violence, Odinga became prime minister.

"It's a very fine line for Odinga to tread, the example from 2008 shows how dangerous it can be," said Stock.

Meanwhile, Kenyatta and his running mate, William Ruto, have been charged by the ICC over their alleged role in the blood-letting five years ago. They deny the accusations and say they will cooperate with investigations. The trial is due to start in July.

The United States and other Western powers, big donors to Kenya, said before last week's election that a Kenyatta win would complicate diplomatic ties with a regional ally in the battle against militant Islam.

The election result is "a relative negative outcome for Kenya's international relations," analysts at Renaissance Capital said.

Ratings agency Fitch, which rates Kenya at sub-investment grade of B-plus with a stable outlook, also said "a political vacuum that delays reform could develop, should the president and deputy president face a lengthy trial."

Renaissance added, however, that Kenya's dependence on aid was small, so any suspension if Kenyatta were found guilty would have limited impact.

And those keen to buy Kenya's assets, such as David Mcilroy, chief investment officer of Alquity, are prepared to take the risks.

"The international community will take a pragmatic approach," he said. "I imagine the trial will take some time - we can park that for now."

You May Like

Video Obama to Send 3,000 Troops to Liberia in Ebola Fight

At Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, President says US will take leadership role for a global response to deadly Ebola virus that is ravaging West Africa More

Video China Muslims Work to Change Perceptions After Knife Attacks

Muslims in Kunming say that they condemn the violence, it is not a reflection of the true beliefs of their faith More

Humanitarian Aid, Equipment Blocked in Cameroon

Move is seen as a developing supply crisis in West Africa More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
NASA Picks Boeing, SpaceX to Carry Astronauts Into Spacei
X
September 17, 2014 4:20 AM
The U.S. space agency, NASA, has chosen Boeing and SpaceX companies to build the next generation of spacecraft that will carry U.S. astronauts to the International Space Station by the year 2017. The deal with private industry enables NASA to end its dependence on Russia to send space crews into low Earth orbit and back. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video NASA Picks Boeing, SpaceX to Carry Astronauts Into Space

The U.S. space agency, NASA, has chosen Boeing and SpaceX companies to build the next generation of spacecraft that will carry U.S. astronauts to the International Space Station by the year 2017. The deal with private industry enables NASA to end its dependence on Russia to send space crews into low Earth orbit and back. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video Future of Ukrainian Former President's Estate Uncertain

More than six months after Ukraine's former President Viktor Yanukovych fled revolution to Russia, authorities have yet to gain control of his palatial estate. Protesters occupy the grounds and opened it to tourists but they are also refusing to turn it over to the state. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Mezhigirya, just north of Kyiv.
Video

Video China Muslims Work to Change Perceptions After Knife Attacks

China says its has sentenced three men to death and one woman to life in prison for a deadly knife attack in March that left more than 30 dead and 140 injured. Beijing says Muslim militants from China's restive western region of Xinjiang carried out the attacks. Now, more than six months after the incident, residents in the city are still coping with the aftermath. VOA's Bill Ide has more from Kunming.
Video

Video Enviropreneur Seeks to Save the Environment, Empower the Community

Lorna Rutto, a former banker, is now an ‘enviropreneur’ - turning plastic waste into furniture and fences discusses the challenges she faces in Africa with raw materials and the environment.
Video

Video West Trades Accusations Over Ransoms

As world leaders try to forge a common response to the threat posed by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, there is simmering tension over differing policies on paying ransoms. In the past month, the jihadist group has beheaded two Americans and one Briton. Both countries refuse to pay ransom money. As Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London, there is uncertainty in the approach of some other European nations.
Video

Video Scotland Independence Bid Stokes Global Interest

The people of Scotland are preparing to vote on whether to become independent and break away from the rest of Britain, in a referendum being watched carefully in many other countries. Some see it as a risky experiment; while others hope a successful vote for independence might energize their own separatist demands. Foreign immigrants to Scotland have a front row seat for the vote. VOA’s Henry Ridgwell spoke to some of them in Edinburgh.
Video

Video Washington DC Mural Artists Help Beautify City

Like many cities, Washington has a graffiti problem. Buildings and homes, especially in low-income neighborhoods, are often targets of illegal artwork. But as we hear from VOA’s Julie Taboh, officials in the nation's capital have come up with an innovative program that uses the talents of local artists to beautify the city.
Video

Video US Muslim Leaders Condemn Islamic State

Leaders of America's Muslim community are condemning the violent extremism of the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. Muslim leaders say militants are exploiting their faith in a failed effort to justify violent extremism. VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports.
Video

Video Bedouin Woman Runs Successful Business in Palestinian City

A Bedouin woman is breaking social taboos by running a successful vacation resort in the Palestinian town of Jericho. Bedouins are a sub-group of Arabs known for their semi-nomadic lifestyle. Zlatica Hoke says the resort in the West Bank's Jordan Valley is a model of success for women in the region.


Carnage and mayhem are part of daily life in northern Nigeria, the result of a terror campaign by the Islamist group Boko Haram. Fears are growing that Nigeria’s government may not know how to counter it, and may be making things worse. More

AppleAndroid