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Kenya: Health Officials Confident Nation Prepared for Ebola

Kenya: Health Officials Confident Nation Prepared for Ebolai
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Lenny Ruvaga
August 07, 2014 6:23 PM
Kenya is famed for its medical research facilities. In the growing wake of the Ebola virus, health officials there now are confident they could quickly contain the disease should the outbreak in West Africa travel east. Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA on the story from Nairobi.

Kenya: Health Officials Confident Nation Prepared for Ebola

Kenya is famed for its medical research  facilities. In the growing wake of the Ebola virus, health officials there now are confident they could quickly contain the disease should the outbreak in West Africa travel east.

Downtown in the heart of Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, people go about their daily business.
 
But Kenyans -- like Africans across the continent -- are concerned that if efforts to contain the current  Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa were to fail, that could leave their country exposed.
   
Kenya's Health Ministry is charged with overseeing preparedness for infectious disease and epidemics.

 


Preparation plans
 
Dr. Nicholas Muraguri, the director of Medical Services, told VOA that if there were an Ebola outbreak, Kenya is prepared.
 
“We have a contingency plan that’s been coordinated by an Ebola outbreak response team which has a number of sub-committees looking at various aspects," said Muraguri. "We also have an elaborate laboratory system that clearly defines how the samples will be collected.”

Ebola virus, rapid rise in spread of the disease, Aug. 7, 2014Ebola virus, rapid rise in spread of the disease, Aug. 7, 2014
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Ebola virus, rapid rise in spread of the disease, Aug. 7, 2014
Ebola virus, rapid rise in spread of the disease, Aug. 7, 2014

KEMRI, the Kenya Medical Research Foundation, is where a team of scientists is working to mitigate any reported case or outbreak of the virus.
 
Dr. Shikanga O-tipo led a team of four Kenyan doctors to assist Liberians with technical expertise on Ebola. He said they have taken steps to prevent an outbreak in Kenya.
 
“Our routine surveillance was stepped up from 26th of March this year when we were notified there was an outbreak in West Africa. Where we have issued out alerts to the health care system," said O-tipo. "We are screening inbound travellers at our main airport, at the same time we are also educating health workers in the major hospital first, then all over the country.”

Ready to assist

Health officials are hopeful Kenya will remain Ebola-free. But Kenya also is ready to help others. A second group of health experts is set to travel to West Africa in the next few weeks to support containment efforts.

  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Tom Frieden displays CDC educational materials as he testifies about the Ebola crisis in West Africa during a hearing of a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Capitol Hill, in Washington, DC, Aug. 7, 2014.
  • Diplomatic envoys gather for a briefing on the status of the Ebola disease control in Nigeria at the Foreign Affairs House, in Abuja,  Aug. 7, 2014.
  • Nigeria's Minister of Health Onyebuchi Chukwu addresses diplomatic envoys on the status of the Ebola disease control in Nigeria, at the Foreign Affairs House in Abuja, Aug. 7, 2014.
  • Locals suspect the unattended man in the street died from the deadly Ebola virus even though the government warns the public not to leave Ebola victims in the streets, in  Monrovia, Liberia, Aug. 5, 2014.
  • A man reads a local newspaper with headline news about a Lagos female doctor who contracted Ebola, in Lagos, Nigeria, Aug. 5, 2014.
  • Lagos State Health Commissioner Jide Idris at a news conference announcing that eight people with symptoms of Ebola are being kept in quarantine after they had contact with Patrick Sawyer, a victim of Ebola who died in July, Lagos, Nigeria, Aug. 5, 2014.
  • An ambulance carrying the American missionary Nancy Writebol, who was infected with Ebola in West Africa, drives past crowds of people, at Emory University Hospital, in Atlanta, Georgia Aug. 5, 2014.
  • At the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials are on a conference call with CDC team members deployed in West Africa from the agency's Emergency Operations Center, Aug. 5, 2014, in Atlanta.
  • Volunteers lower a corpse into a grave. They are using safe burial practices to reduce person-to-person transmission of Ebola, in Kailahun, Eastern Province of Sierra Leone, Aug. 2, 2014.

 

 


 

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Comments
     
by: Suzy from: Texas
August 13, 2014 9:09 PM
I have volunteered on a medical missionary team to Kenya the past two years. They are no more "ready" to deal with Ebola than I am to fly. The clinic I served in gets $60 worth of Tylenol every quarter. That's it. My group takes several thousand dollars worth of medicine every summer, but it only lasts a few months because the Kenyan government decided medicine must be free. People get it and lose it or forget to take if, because it has no value to them. There are hardly any doctors, only nurses. Most medication comes from India or China. According to a study in a study in The Lancet, approximately 35% of anti malarial drugs are fake or expired. I could go on and on about the dreadful state of health care in Kenya. The exceptions are the Aga Khan hospitals, which are not run by the Kenyan government, so have a chance at being good.


by: Bruce Brown from: Peoria Heights, Illinois
August 07, 2014 5:46 PM
"Kenyan Officials are ...'confident' ? Goodluck Jonathan !!! I thought the headline was a joke. Heaven help us (and them) - we are ALL IN FOR IT NOW, surely.


by: Kim davis from: Norman oklahoma
August 07, 2014 4:50 PM
This article is thurough. I am saddened by the loss of life in Africa. I belive even though the vacine that has been developed should be sent as soon as soon as possible, I realize the vaccine is in its infintile stage but it can bring hope and possibly save lives , the benifit out weighs the risk. No country should hold back medical help to another country. As fo the U.S. Allowing 2 people infected with ebola in this country without regard to its citizens, they, the powers that be should be charged with criminal neglagence n premeditated murder,

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