News / Africa

Kenyatta Becomes New President of Kenya

Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta (C) displays the special sword that he received to represent his instruments of power from his predecessor, Mwai Kibaki (2nd L), after his official swearing-in ceremony at Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta (C) displays the special sword that he received to represent his instruments of power from his predecessor, Mwai Kibaki (2nd L), after his official swearing-in ceremony at Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
Gabe Joselow
Uhuru Kenyatta vowed to promote peace, unity and economic development at his inauguration Tuesday as Kenya’s fourth president. Kenyatta and his deputy are taking power while facing charges at the International Criminal Court, which could complicate the country’s relations with the world community.
 
Kenyatta took the oath of office in an elaborate ceremony at the Moi International Sports Center outside Nairobi.
 
A host of African leaders watched the proceedings in VIP seating behind the dais, including Nigeria’s Goodluck Jonathan, Rwanda’s Paul Kagame and Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe. The U.S. ambassador and the British high commissioner to Kenya also attended.

 
New Kenyan President Faces Challenges in Promise to Unite the Countryi
X
April 10, 2013 8:50 PM
Kenya’s new President Uhuru Kenyatta has promised to unite the country, divided by a long and hard-fought election. As VOA East Africa Correspondent Gabe Joselow reports, Mr. Kenyatta has a tough task ahead, with many still skeptical of the new administration.

Vowing peace, unity

The 51-year-old son of Kenya’s founding president, a former finance minister and one of the country’s richest men, Kenyatta said his administration would focus on achieving peace and strengthening unity, following a divisive election.
 
“Today, work begins. The time has come not to ask what community we come from, but rather, what dreams we share. The time has come to ask not what political party we belong to, but rather what partnerships we can build,” said Kenyatta.
 
Outgoing president Mwai Kibaki handed over to Kenyatta the symbolic instruments of power - a sword and a copy of the constitution. Kibaki said he has “no doubt that the country is in good hands.”

Uhuru Kenyatta Factbox:

  • Elected president March 4
  • 51 years old; son of Kenya's first president
  • Facing crimes against humanity charges at ICC over violence following 2007 election
  • Former deputy prime minister and finance minister
  • Nominated to parliament in 2001
  • Appointed to run the Kenya Tourism Board in 1999
Upcoming ICC trials

Kenyatta and his deputy, William Ruto, are both facing charges at the International Criminal Court for crimes related to the deadly inter-ethnic violence that swept the country following the last vote in 2007.
 
In a statement released Tuesday, Human Rights Watch called on Kenya’s new leaders to cooperate with the ICC and to uphold their promise to attend their trials.
 
Western nations told Kenyans ahead of the vote that the election of two ICC indictees could complicate diplomatic relations. Kenyatta did not directly address the issue during his speech, though he and his supporters have, in the past, dismissed the warning as foreign interference.
 
In a speech at the inauguration, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni praised Kenyan voters for rejecting what he called “blackmail” by the ICC and accused external powers of using the international court to achieve a political agenda.
 
“They are now using it to install leaders of their choice in Africa and eliminate the ones they do not like,” said Museveni.

  • Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta takes the oath of office as his wife Margaret holds a bible during the official swearing-in ceremony at Kasarani Stadium in Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
  • Traditional dancers entertain guests using drums before the official swearing-in ceremony of Kenya's Uhuru Kenyatta at Kasarani Stadium, Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
  • Kenya's outgoing President Mwai Kibaki inspects the honor guard before the official swearing-in ceremony of President Uhuru Kenyatta at Kasarani Stadium, Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
  • Kenya's outgoing president Mwai Kibaki waves as he arrives for the inauguration of Uhuru Kenyatta at Kasarani stadium, Nairobi, April 9, 2013.
  • A traditional dancer leaves after entertaining guests before the official swearing-in ceremony of Kenya's Uhuru Kenyatta, Nairobi, April 9, 2013.

Following a new constitution

Kenyatta will be the first president to govern under the new constitution, passed in 2010, and designed to decentralize power and to more equitably distribute funds among the country’s 47 counties.
 
Nairobi lawyer and political analyst Martin Oloo said implementation of the constitution will be a key test for the new administration.
 
“They must demonstrate to Kenyans that they believe in the constitution and in particular that they believe in devolution. Over the next couple of months we are going to see how that pans out," said Oloo. "Chances are that they are going to succeed or fail on how they support or interpret the constitution and, in particular, the issue of devolution.”
 
Kenyatta won last month's election by a razor thin margin. His nearest rival, outgoing Prime Minister Raila Odinga, challenged the results at the Supreme Court, alleging the vote counting was flawed.  
 
After two weeks of court proceedings, the six justices ruled unanimously to uphold Kenyatta’s victory.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Paul Gesimba from: Nairobi
April 10, 2013 12:58 AM
Apparently what you refer as razor thin margin was close to seven hundred thousand votes .The Supreme Court also ruled in his favor .Kenyans only wish and hope that he will serve them equally and without fear or favor .especially the close to 50% of the Voters who voted for the other candidates .


by: Pauline
April 09, 2013 11:26 AM
Jacob Zuma of South Africa, the deputy president of China and other distinguished African and world leaders were present. Uhuru and Ruto have nothing to prove to Kenyans - we believe them because we know them. We also know who should have been indicted by the ICC but was not.

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