News / Africa

    Kenyan University Offers Degree Programs on Climate Change

    Reuben Kyama

    Changing climate conditions are making it harder for people in East Africa, most of whom grow food or raise livestock, to survive.

    Rainy seasons are changing, destructive floods and temperatures have risen, and the soils have become drier than in recent years. Among the hardest hit are arid and semi-arid regions, small islands and the coastal strips.

    Environmental experts say it’s important for the people of the region to learn to adapt.

    In an effort to help farmers, the University of Nairobi is now offering a masters and a doctorate in climate change –  joining Kenyatta University as one of a few East African institutions of higher learning to offer advanced degrees on the topic.

    According to Professor Shem Wandiga, acting chairman of the newly-established Institute for Climate Change and Adaptation, the university is proud to introduce the new programs.

    "We found that there were a lot of gaps – nine gaps or areas – which needed tackling," he explained. "For these reasons, we are putting all of these into a course which will address basically the gaps that are in Africa, ranging from agriculture and food security to human dimensions of climate change, and areas of policy gaps and gender gaps."

    Professor Wandiga said the institute will offer Master’s courses in Climate Change and Adaptation beginning September. He said that the university board approved the degree program last December after realizing that climate change is a devastating reality in Africa.

    The program will focus on governance, case studies and the benefits of mitigation.

    "We want to spend our energy and efforts on creating resilience [for] people who are living in these areas and may have experienced the impact of climate change," said Wandinga. "Our research and activities will be trying to help such people to develop survival and adaptation systems. We are going to look at both the adaptation as well as the mitigation. As a university, we also have to look at the science."
                                      
    University officials said the course will be open to students from all disciplines, since the issue of climate change cuts across all sectors. Many students are already applying for the program that will offer 30 scholarships, 15 each for master’s and PhD levels.

    But Dr. Joseph Ininda, acting Head of the Department of Meteorology at the University of Nairobi, said his department had already begun offering post-graduate courses on the topic.

    "We’ve a diversity of students. Some are working; others have just finished their first degree," he said. "There’s potential in almost all sectors that require these kinds of applications. There are those who will use the training indirectly and those who will apply the skills in their places of work. We see it as capacity building on issues of climate change."

    So far, he said, the program had attracted about 50 students, saying that the number was expected to increase.

    Josephine Kirui works with East Africa Dairy Development Project, an initiative of small-scale farmers supported by Heifer International, and has enrolled for a Master’s of Science degree in Climate Change.

    "I wanted to understand what are the real issues," she said, "because small-scale farmers are faced with a lot of problems… What I am learning in this course is that there were a lot of things that I didn’t know about climate change, but now I’m getting to understand the science behind it."

    Another student, Ireri Waithavu, said he feels the same way.

    "Initially, I wanted to do environmental science," he said, "but when I looked at it, it was too complicated, and I decided to narrow it down to something much simpler – that is straightforward. My idea was on climate change."So, when I heard the university had started the course, I was very excited, and I thought I could go learn more... and distinguish between climate change and weather change."

    According to climate change experts, the global temperature rise must be limited urgently to avoid serious impact on African agricultural production, given that 80 percent of all Africans rely on rain-fed agriculture for a living.

    [Editors Note:  An earlier version of this story erroneously stated that the University of Nairobi was the only institution of higher learning in East Africa to offer an advanced degree in climate change. At least one other university, Nairobi's Kenyatta University, also offers a Masters of Environmental Studies (Climate Change and Sustainability)].

    Listen to report on U. Nairobi degree program on climate change.
    Listen to report on U. Nairobi degree program on climate change.i
    || 0:00:00
    ...    
     
    X

    You May Like

    US Lawmakers Vow to Continue Immigrant Program for Afghan Interpreters

    Congressional inaction threatens funding for effort which began in 2008 and has allowed more than 20,000 interpreters, their family members to immigrate to US

    Brexit's Impact on Russia Stirs Concern

    Some analysts see Brexit aiding Putin's plans to destabilize European politics; others note that an economically unstable Europe is not in Moscow's interests

    US to Train Cambodian Government on Combating Cybercrime

    Concerns raised over drafting of law, as critics fear cybercrime regulations could be used to restrict freedom of expression and stifle political dissent

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: mememine69 from: Toronto
    August 28, 2012 4:14 PM
    HELP SAVE THE CLIMATE CHANGE MOVEMENT AND CO2 MITIGATION : Urge the scientists to say it WILL happen, not just MIGHT and COULD and LIKELY will happen. The planet is at risk! Contact a scientist and demand action NOW!
    In Response

    by: Gitau Davis from: Kenyatta University
    August 31, 2012 8:42 AM
    Dear Reuben,
    This Programme rolled out in Kenyatta University in April 2010 for Masters Students.Since then the University has continued to admit more students every year. I was Lucky to have been among the first to enroll for a Masters in Climate Change and Sustainability in KU. Please correct your records. UoN is not the first in the continent.Kudos KU.
    In Response

    by: DAVIS GITAU from: NYAHURURU
    August 31, 2012 8:31 AM
    I am really surprised to read that,UoN is starting a programme on Climate Change for Masters and Doctorate degrees in September 2012 and it is the first in the African Continent. Kenyatta University started this programme in 2010 and I am among the first students who enrolled for a Master in climate channge in April 2010. Please correct your records.

    By the Numbers

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Baghdad Bikers Defy War with a Roari
    X
    June 28, 2016 10:33 AM
    Baghdad is a city of contradictions. War is a constant. Explosions and kidnappings are part of daily life. But the Iraqi capital remains a thriving city, even if a little beat up. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on how some in Baghdad are defying the stereotype of a nation at war by pursuing a lifestyle known for its iconic symbols of rebellion: motorbikes, leather jackets and roaring engines.
    Video

    Video Baghdad Bikers Defy War with a Roar

    Baghdad is a city of contradictions. War is a constant. Explosions and kidnappings are part of daily life. But the Iraqi capital remains a thriving city, even if a little beat up. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on how some in Baghdad are defying the stereotype of a nation at war by pursuing a lifestyle known for its iconic symbols of rebellion: motorbikes, leather jackets and roaring engines.
    Video

    Video Melting Pot of Immigrants Working to Restore US Capitol Dome

    The American Iron Works company is one of the firms working to renovate the iconic U.S. Capitol Dome. The company employs immigrants of many different cultural and national backgrounds. VOA’s Arman Tarjimanyan has more.
    Video

    Video Testing Bamboo as Building Material

    For thousands of years various species of bamboo - one of the world's most versatile plants - have been used for diverse purposes ranging from food and medicine to textiles and construction. But its use on a large scale is hampered because it's not manufactured to specific standards but grown in the ground. A University of Pittsburgh professor is on track to changing that. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Orphanage in Iraqi City Houses Kids Who Lost their Parents to Attacks by IS

    An orphanage in Iraqi Kurdistan has become home to scores of Yazidi children who lost their parents after Islamic State militants took over Sinjar in Iraq’s Nineveh Province in 2014. Iraqi Kurdish forces backed by the U.S. airstrikes have since recaptured Sinjar but the need for the care provided by the orphanage continues. VOA’s Kawa Omar filed this report narrated by Rob Raffaele.
    Video

    Video Re-Opening Old Wounds in a Bullet-Riddled Cultural Landmark

    A cultural landmark before Lebanon’s civil war transformed it into a nest of snipers, Beirut’s ‘Yellow House’ is once again set to play a crucial role in the city.  Built in a neo-Ottoman style in the 1920s, in September it is set to be re-opened as a ‘memory museum’ - its bullet-riddled walls and bunkered positions overlooking the city’s notorious ‘Green Line’ maintained for posterity. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Brexit Resounds in US Presidential Contest

    Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is resounding in America’s presidential race. As VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump sees Britain’s move as an affirmation of his campaign’s core messages, while Democrat Hillary Clinton sees the episode as further evidence that Trump is unfit to be president.
    Video

    Video New York Pride March A Celebration of Life, Mourning of Loss

    At this year’s march in New York marking the end of pride week, a record-breaking crowd of LGBT activists and allies marched down Manhattan's Fifth Avenue, in what will be long remembered as a powerful display of solidarity and remembrance for the 49 victims killed two weeks ago in an Orlando gay nightclub.
    Video

    Video NASA Juno Spacecraft, Nearing Jupiter, to Shed Light on Gas Giant

    After a five-year journey, the spacecraft Juno is nearing its destination, the giant planet Jupiter, where it will enter orbit and start sending data back July 4th. As Mike O'Sullivan reports from Pasadena, California, the craft will pierce the veil of Jupiter's dense cloud cover to reveal its mysteries.
    Video

    Video Orlando Shooting Changes Debate on Gun Control

    It’s been nearly two weeks since the largest mass shooting ever in the United States. Despite public calls for tighter gun control laws, Congress is at an impasse. Democratic lawmakers resorted to a 1960s civil rights tactic to portray their frustration. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti explains how the Orlando, Florida shooting is changing the debate.
    Video

    Video Tunisian Fishing Town Searches for Jobs, Local Development Solutions

    As the European Union tries to come to grips with its migrant crisis, some newcomers are leaving voluntarily. But those returning to their home countries face an uncertain future.  Five years after Tunisia's revolution, the tiny North African country is struggling with unrest, soaring unemployment and plummeting growth. From the southern Tunisian fishing town of Zarzis, Lisa Bryant takes a look for VOA at a search for local solutions.
    Video

    Video 'American Troops' in Russia Despite Tensions

    Historic battle re-enactment is a niche hobby with a fair number of adherents in Russia where past military victories are played-up by the Kremlin as a show of national strength. But, one group of World War II re-enactors in Moscow has the rare distinction of choosing to play western ally troops. VOA's Daniel Schearf explains.
    Video

    Video Muslim American Mayor Calls for Tolerance

    Syrian-born Mohamed Khairullah describes himself as "an American mayor who happens to be Muslim." As the three-term mayor of Prospect Park, New Jersey, he believes his town of 6,000 is an example of how ethnicity and religious beliefs should not determine a community's leadership. Ramon Taylor has this report from Prospect Park.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora