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Kenya's High Court Affirms President Kenyatta's Election



Kenya's Supreme Court has unanimously ruled the country's March 4 election was valid, upholding the election of Uhuru Kenyatta as president.

Chief Justice Willy Mutunga says the court ruled Saturday that Mr. Kenyatta and his deputy, William Ruto, were legally elected. Mutunga says the election was conducted within the provisions of the constitution.

Runner-up Raila Odinga, who had challenged results of the March 4 poll, pledged to obey the court's decision and wished Mr. Kenyatta well.

Outside the court in Nairobi, police fired tear gas at a group of angry Odinga supporters who rallied against the ruling. Demonstrations also broke out in the western city of Kisumu, an Odinga stronghold. A VOA reporter saw four protesters who were apparently injured in clashes with police.

Kenya's electoral commission originally said Mr. Kenyatta won the election outright, with just over 50 percent of the ballots in first-round voting. However, Odinga contended that vote totals from some polling stations had been altered.



A civil society group said the commission announced Mr. Kenyatta's election before it had finished a complete vote count.

Ethnic violence sparked by a disputed presidential vote in 2007 killed more than 1,100 people and displaced 600,000 others in Kenya.

Mr. Kenyatta still faces charges he helped organize that violence. Proceedings before the International Criminal Court in The Hague have been delayed until later this year.
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