News / Middle East

Kerry: 'Productive' Discussions with Netanyahu, Abbas

Kerry: 'Good Faith' Needed for Middle East Peacei
X
November 07, 2013 6:59 AM
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said good faith and serious efforts are required from both Israelis and Palestinians to bring about a two-state solution following separate meetings Wednesday with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said he has had "productive" discussions with both Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas about a two-state solution to their decades-long crisis.

Kerry has met twice separately with Prime Minister Netanyahu and President Abbas over the past two days, and said that "despite difficulties" those talks have "opened up a number of different things that can be included as we proceed forward."  But he will not say what those things are.

"By agreement, all the parties are not going to discuss what we are discussing. And since I'm the one who invoked that rule, I'm not going to stand up here and break it," Kerry said. "But it is important for us to be able to proceed carefully, quietly, and secretly, frankly."

He said not speaking publicly gives leaders the ability to explore different possibilities.

But leaders are speaking publicly. And it is not encouraging.

John Kerry's travels, November 2–12John Kerry's travels, November 2–12
x
John Kerry's travels, November 2–12
John Kerry's travels, November 2–12
Prime Minister Netanyahu is blaming Palestinians for incitement, for creating artificial crises, and for running away from tough choices. Palestinian negotiators say Israelis are making unreasonable demands over water rights and are undermining the talks with plans for thousands of new Israeli homes on occupied Palestinian land.

The scale of those new settlements has put President Abbas under considerable domestic pressure, including allegations that he agreed to that construction as part of returning to talks. On Wednesday, Kerry defended the Palestinian leader, saying the United States believes those settlements are illegitimate.

Following talks with Kerry in Amman Thursday, Jordanian Foreign Minister Naser Judeh said Israeli settlements are impeding peace, and negotiations must be accelerated to get to a final status agreement on a two-state solution, including the states' borders. "Partial solutions, in my book, that leave issues hanging which could potentially come back and fly at our throats in the future, are not solutions," he said.

With six months to go in these talks, Kerry said there is no time for interim agreements.

"If you leave the main issues hanging out there, mischief makers will make the most of that and bad things will happen in the interval that then make it even harder to get to the final status," stated Kerry.

He said peace between Israelis and Palestinians is long overdue.

"The stakes here are huge. And obviously the lack of peace confronts everybody with choices, frankly, that nobody wants to contemplate," said Kerry.

Kerry meets again with Prime Minister Netanyahu in Israel Friday following a Thursday dinner in Jordan with President Abbas.

You May Like

Australia Knights Prince Philip, Sparking National Outrage

Abbott's surprise reintroduction of knights and dames in the country's honors system last year drew criticism that he was out of touch with national sentiment More

SAG Award Boosts 'Birdman' Oscar Hopes

Individual acting Oscars appear to be sewn up: SAG awards went to artists who won Golden Globes: Julianne Moore, Eddie Redmayne, Patricia Arquette, J.K. Simmons More

Katy Perry Lights Way for Super Bowl's Girl Power Moment

Pop star's selection to headline US football championship's halftime show extends NFL's trend of selecting artists who appeal to younger viewers More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: mRS. Dyre from: Miami
November 07, 2013 4:37 PM
A "man" that belongs to Bohemian Grove undermines him being Secretary of State. SHAMEFUL!


by: Dr. Livings from: USA
November 07, 2013 4:35 PM
This man is a real weirdo, with some pretty questionable "Club" practices. BOHEMIAN GROVE. ENOUGH SAID.


by: Madelyn Itchycrotch from: UK
November 07, 2013 12:42 PM
Often on the news we hear the terms "occupied territories", "1967 borders", and "illegal settlements". And the story we usually hear sounds very simple... During the six day war, Israel captured the West Bank from the Palestinians, refused the UN demand to retreat, and illegally built settlements, but is that really the case? Let's start with a simple but EXTREMELY IMPORTANT question: From whom did Israel capture the West Bank? From the Palestinians? NO! In 1967 there was NO Arab nation or state by the name of Palestine. Actually was there ever? So, who's territory is it? Until 1917 the Ottoman Empire occupied the whole region. After losing in WW1 the Ottomans relinquished their 500 year control to the allied forces which decided to divide the old empire into countries. Britain recognized the Jews historical right to their homeland. A small area equivalent to about half of 1% of the Middle East was designated for this purpose. However, do you realize what happened? The Jewish homeland not only included the West Bank, but also the East Bank of the Jordan River. I suppose you cannot say that the Jewish people have not accepted some painful compromises, already. With the British Mandate ending, UN general assembly resolution #181, recommended the establishment of two states; one Jewish and one Arab. The Jews accepted it and went on to create the nation of Israel in 1948. While the Arabs refused a compromise and launched a war to destroy the newly established nation. At the end of the war, a cease fire line was formed, (armistice line, 1949), and both sides stopped fighting. At the insistence of the Arab leaders, this line was defined as having NO political significance. So, although this line is commonly referred to as the "1967 border", it is NOT from 1967, and it was never an international border. Israel's presence in the West Bank is the result of self defense. The West Bank should not be considered "occupied", because there was no previous legal sovereign in the area. And therefore, the real definition should be "disputed" territory. The 1947 partition plan has no current legal standing, while Israel's claim to the land was clearly recognized by the international community during the 20th century.That is why the presence of Israeli settlements and construction in the West Bank should NOT be considered illegal. So what is the solution to the dispute over the West Bank? Fortunately the solution lies in God's Word, and His unbreakable covenants and promises to his chosen people. Any negotiations must be based on legal and historical FACTS. So stop using the so-called terms "illegal" and "occupied" territories," and "1967 borders". They are simply not politically correct or in agreement with Gods Word.


by: Dr. Dorean McNeal from: Dublin
November 07, 2013 11:02 AM
the "Two State Solution" was an idea advanced by Clinton and like Clinton has been discarded and discredited. Time to move on, the Philistines have a country and its called Jordan. Any attempt at carving such a small territory and giving half of it to a malicious terrorist organization (hamas) will in effect destroy Israel. I just hope the Israelis will assert their rights more aggressively...

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Zoo Animals Show Their Artistic Sidesi
X
June Soh
January 23, 2015 10:03 PM
The pursuit of happiness is so important, America's founding fathers put it in the Declaration of Independence. Any zookeeper will tell you animals need enrichment, just like humans do. So painting, and even music, are part of the Smithsonian National Zoo's program to keep the animals happy. VOA’s June Soh met some animal artists at the zoo in Washington. Faith Lapidus narrates.
Video

Video Zoo Animals Show Their Artistic Sides

The pursuit of happiness is so important, America's founding fathers put it in the Declaration of Independence. Any zookeeper will tell you animals need enrichment, just like humans do. So painting, and even music, are part of the Smithsonian National Zoo's program to keep the animals happy. VOA’s June Soh met some animal artists at the zoo in Washington. Faith Lapidus narrates.
Video

Video Progress, Some Areas of Disagreement in Cuba Talks

U.S. and Cuban officials are reporting progress from initial talks in Havana on re-establishing diplomatic ties. U.S. Assistant Secretary of State (for Western Hemisphere Affairs) Roberta Jacobson said while there was agreement on a broad range of issues, there also are some “profound disagreements” between Washington and Havana. VOA State Department correspondent Pam Dockins has the story.
Video

Video Worldwide Photo Workshops Empower Youth

Last September, 20 young adults from South Sudan took part in a National Geographic Photo Camp. They are among hundreds of students from around the world who have learned how to use a camera to tell the stories of the people in their communities through the powerful medium of photography. Three camp participants talked about their experiences recently on a visit to Washington. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video US, Japan Offer Lessons as Eurozone Launches Huge Stimulus

The Euro currency has fallen sharply after the European Central Bank announced a bigger-than-expected $67 billion-a-month quantitative easing program Thursday - commonly seen as a form of printing new money. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London on whether the move might rescue the eurozone economy -- and what lessons have been learned from similar programs around the world.
Video

Video Nigerian Elections Pose Concern of Potential Conflict in 'Middle Belt'

Nigeria’s north-central state of Kaduna has long been the site of fighting between Muslims and Christians as well as between people of different ethnic groups. As the February elections approach, community and religious leaders are making plans they hope will keep the streets calm after results are announced. Chris Stein reports from the state capital, Kaduna.
Video

Video As Viewership Drops, Obama Puts His Message on YouTube

Ratings reports show President Obama’s State of the Union address this week drew the lowest number of viewers for this annual speech in 15 years. White House officials anticipated this, and the president has decided to take a non-traditional approach to getting his message out. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Video

Video S. Korean Businesses Want to End Trade Restrictions With North

Business leaders in South Korea are calling for President Park Geun-hye to ease trade restrictions with North Korea that were put in place in 2010 after the sinking of a South Korean warship.Pro-business groups argue that expanding trade and investment is not only good for business, it is also good for long-term regional peace and security. VOA’s Brian Padden reports.
Video

Video US Marching Bands Grow Into a Show of Their Own

The 2014 Super Bowl halftime show was the most-watched in history - attracting an estimated 115 million viewers. That event featured pop star Bruno Mars. But the halftime show tradition started with marching bands, which still dominate the entertainment at U.S. high school and college American football games. But as Enming Liu reports in this story narrated by Adrianna Zhang, marching bands have grown into a show of their own.

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More

All About America

AppleAndroid