News / Asia

    At ASEAN, China Rejects US 'Freeze'

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi during, ASEAN Regional Forum, Myanmar International Convention Centre, Naypyitaw, Aug. 9, 2014.
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi during, ASEAN Regional Forum, Myanmar International Convention Centre, Naypyitaw, Aug. 9, 2014.
    Ron Corben

    China is dismissing U.S. calls for a freeze on "provocative acts" in disputed waters of the South China Sea.

    Addressing reporters Saturday at a meeting of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) in Naypyidaw, Myanmar, also known as Burma, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi rejected calls by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to manage maritime disputes based on international law.

    Calling the situation in the South China Sea stable, Wang restated China's position of protecting its regional sovereignty.

    As "responsible great power," Wang said, "China is ready to maintain restraint, but for unreasonable provocative activities, China is bound to make a clear and firm reaction."

    The United States has accused China of asserting itself militarily in territorial disputes with Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam, and the Philippines in the South China Sea, and in competing claims with Japan over a group of uninhabited islands northeast of Taiwan.

    While at the conference, Kerry said ASEAN members needed to work together to manage tensions peacefully and that the organization has a unique responsibility to ensure security of critical global sea lanes and ports.

    According to Carl Thayer, a defense analyst at Australia's University of New South Wales, Wang's dismissal of Kerry's comments, made with the backing of some ASEAN member states, only reaffirms China's long-established position on the South China Sea dispute resolution.

    "ASEAN won't give a united position to China because they fear it will be rejected, and that China [will say] 'we want Laos, Cambodia, and everybody else to tell us what they think,'" he said, calling China's position on the South China Sea part of a "diplomatic game" designed to marginalize U.S. influence and create divisions within the ASEAN community.

    "So they are playing quite well in that disarray and I just can't see China is serious in any of this," he said. 

    ASEAN Secretary General Le Luong Minh of Vietnam said Kerry's proposal was not formally discussed, adding that mechanisms are already in place to address issues of land reclamation and building on disputed islands.

    The Philippines also appeared to step back from earlier calls for a moratorium on so-called "provocative activities."

    Aside from this weekend's ASEAN foreign ministers meeting, delegates are set to meet with representatives from "dialogue partner" countries, including Russia, Japan, India, Australia, the European Union as well as the U.S.

    You May Like

    Hope Remains for Rio Olympic Games

    Facing a host of problems, Rio prepares for holding the games but experts say some risks, like Zika, may not be as grave as initially thought

    IS Use of Social Media to Recruit, Radicalize Still a Top Threat to US

    Despite military gains against IS in Iraq and Syria, their internet propaganda still commands an audience; US officials see 'the most complex challenge that the federal government and industry face'

    ‘Time Is Now’ to Save Africa’s Animals From Poachers, Activist Says

    During Zimbabwe visit, African Wildlife Foundation President Kaddu Sebunya says poaching hurts Africa as slave trade once did

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: commie from: china
    August 12, 2014 5:59 PM
    Get rid of the lawless and greedy communist out of peace loving ASEAN.

    by: Lawrence from: Kwt
    August 10, 2014 10:50 AM
    You does'nt seem to know the structures and islands that China is building. Please read some news lately before commenting some things that you obviuosly dont know.
    In Response

    by: keith W from: Butner, NC
    August 11, 2014 2:45 PM
    Ok, so much hate! I do read news and watch it frequently each day! I will never say I am right or have correct views and I am always open to correction if I am wrong. I only comment on observations I see on the news now if I'm wrong then don't hate me, just correct me!

    by: Sino-phobia from: rest of the world
    August 10, 2014 1:55 AM
    Every time, PRC invades neighboring countries, especially small and weak countries such as Vietnam, Philippines, Uighur, Mongolia, and Tibet. Provocative actions are always started by PRC, as rest of the world well know.
    In Response

    by: william li from: canada
    August 11, 2014 10:52 AM
    what did THE REST OF THE WORLD do when America invaded Iraq with fabricated excuses? what did they do when America bombed innocent villagers with drones in Pakistan and Afghanistan? may be China should copy it from America, just bomb viet and finos with drones! what do you say?

    by: tran van hai from: usa
    August 10, 2014 1:30 AM
    Meanbill's words seem to come directly from the Chinese commies. He must have been paid to work as a mouthpiece for these Chinese commies. As a Vietnamese, I know more than anyone how vicious and how barbarious the Chinese aggressors are and how our people hate these Chinese invaders who built their country through stealing other countries' land. Yes, we do want the US involvement a million times more than the Chinese.

    by: Keith W from: Butner, NC
    August 09, 2014 10:24 PM
    It is my opinion that China has the power over it's own territories and does not need to be told how or when they need to run those said territories. I personally think the US should back away from conflict of any nature and first protect our homeland and then work with other nations to forward their own technologies or have them advance our own. This is not 1960 anymore. This is 2014 and the US can not be so high and mighty that we let every opportunity to be a better nation pass us by. China is by far our biggest asset in the world today. Whether we like it or not, we need china.
    In Response

    by: william li from: canada
    August 11, 2014 10:44 AM
    a China fully controlled South China sea services better American interests, because only powerful China can keep this area in peace.
    and America will always has the freedom of navigation. BTW, majority shipping is controlled by China now, 80% ships traveling in SCS belong to China. america doesn't need to be worried. there is no American ship traveling in SCS except warships.
    In Response

    by: Mike from: Canada
    August 11, 2014 6:48 AM
    U.S. is involved because freedom of navigation in South China Sea ( South of China not belong to China) is in interest of U.S. China is slowly creeping into others territories claiming 90% of South China, with no historical evidence but bullying its weaker neighbours into conceding their territories, Vietnam and Phillipines.

    As China is U.S. biggest asset is a joke. China wants to replace U.S. as dominant power in Asia. U.S. sent all manufacturing jobs and China and made them more powerful and richer. China in return exports poison all around the world. I don't think U.S. needs China as China needs U.S. You must be Chinese national or some relations to Chinese.

    by: meanbill from: USA
    August 09, 2014 6:22 PM
    EVERYTIME the US interferes in the politics of other countries, (they bring only violence, destruction, killings and wars, that just keep going on), and the (ASEAN) countries told Kerry and the US, they didn't need the US interference in solving "their" political problems, (but), Kerry still has the little islanders of the rising sun, to complain too, doesn't he?.....

    LOOK at all the countries the US politically interfered in, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Syria, Yemen, and now Ukraine, (and now), would you really want the US interfering in your countries politics?..... REALLY?
    In Response

    by: earthling01 from: US
    August 11, 2014 1:42 PM
    "EVERYTIME" is a bit of an exaggeration. The US has played a role in promoting democracy and economic development throughout Asia and many countries mentioned above. US still has bases in Okinawa, for ex, to defend Japan from DPRK.
    To the US's credit, it pulled out of Iraq, but has been forced back in against its own best interests. It is also on a path to troop reduction in Afghanistan, although the govt is slow to take on full self-defense.

    China's role in Asia, on the other hand, is much more hostile and aggressive in that it is exploiting its neighbors' territories and natural resources. There is to internal conflict asking for Chinese aid; there are no terrorist attacks from VN, Laos etc inciting China to respond militarily. Hence, these invasive provocations are solely to promote China's own self-serving power grab in Asia. China has no intent to "leave" once their role is no longer needed.

    I might also add that many scores of Americans openly oppose the US "wars" in Asia and Middle-East. And yet, where are the voices of Chinese citizens against China's military exploits?

    This is the difference between Chinese and US "aggression".
    In Response

    by: william li from: canada
    August 11, 2014 10:37 AM
    well said!
    @Hoang, without American oil and weapons, Japan couldn't even start the invasion to China. Japan invaded China in 1937, but until japan attacked pearl harbor in 1941, america did help China on the contrary was still supplying Japan with oil and weapons! America always support terrorists then shoot its own toe. America supported Japan before WWII, America supported Taliban and Saddam, America supported ISIS in Syria. and all those mad dogs bit america after. BTW it was Soviet army defeated Japanese army on China's land. American soldiers never landed on China! the RED army crushed Japan like a baby!
    In Response

    by: Dustin from: Utah
    August 10, 2014 11:11 AM
    Haha! Totally agree. I don't even want the US messing around in the US's politics!
    In Response

    by: Hoang from: Canada
    August 10, 2014 6:52 AM
    Meanbill from China,
    Without U.S. interference in world war 2, China would still be a colony of the Empire of Japan. China during war 2 was crying for U.S. to come free China from Japan.
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    August 10, 2014 12:41 AM
    Kerry sticking his tongue out. He must be going after the teenager vote.
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    August 09, 2014 9:01 PM
    IGNORAMOUS

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolatei
    X
    July 29, 2016 4:02 PM
    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolate

    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Tesla Opens Battery-Producing Gigafactory

    Two years after starting to produce electric cars, U.S. car maker Tesla Motors has opened the first part of its huge battery manufacturing plant, which will eventually cover more than a square kilometer. Situated close to Reno, Nevada, the so-called Gigafactory will eventually produce more lithium-ion batteries than were made worldwide in 2013. VOA's George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Polio-affected Afghan Student Fulfilling Her Dreams in America

    Afghanistan is one of only two countries in the world where children still get infected by polio. The other is Pakistan. Mahbooba Akhtarzada who is from Afghanistan, was disabled by polio, but has managed to overcome the obstacles caused by this crippling disease. VOA's Zheela Nasari caught up with Akhtarzada and brings us this report narrated by Bronwyn Benito.
    Video

    Video Hillary Clinton Promises to Build a 'Better Tomorrow'

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton urged voters Thursday not to give in to the politics of fear. She vowed to unite the country and move it forward if elected in November. Clinton formally accepted the Democratic Party's nomination at its national convention in Philadelphia. VOA national correspondent Jim Malone has more.
    Video

    Video Trump Tones Down Praise for Russia

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is toning down his compliments for Russia and Vladimir Putin as such rhetoric got him in trouble recently. After calling on Russia to find 30.000 missing emails from rival Hillary Clinton, Trump told reporters he doesn't know Putin and never called him a great leader, just one who's better than President Barack Obama. Putin has welcomed Trump's overtures, but, as Zlatica Hoke reports, ordinary Russians say they are not putting much faith in Trump.
    Video

    Video Uganda Unveils its First Solar-powered Bus

    A solar-powered bus described by its Ugandan makers as the first in Africa has made its public debut. Kiira Motors' electric bus, Kayoola, displayed recently at a stadium in Uganda's capital. From Kampala, Maurice Magorane filed this report narrated by Salem Solomon.
    Video

    Video Silicon Valley: More Than A Place, It's a Culture

    Silicon Valley is a technology powerhouse and a place that companies such as Google, Facebook and Apple call home. It is a region in northern California that stretches from San Francisco to San Jose. But, more than that, it's known for its startup culture. VOA's Elizabeth Lee went inside one company to find out what it's like to work in a startup.
    Video

    Video Immigrant Delegate Marvels at Democratic Process

    It’s been a bitter and divisive election season – but first time Indian-American delegate Dr. Shashi Gupta headed to the Democratic National Convention with a sense of hope. VOA’s Katherine Gypson followed this immigrant with the love of U.S. politics all the way to Philadelphia.
    Video

    Video Dutch Entrepreneurs Turn Rainwater Into Beer

    June has been recorded as one of the wettest months in more than a century in many parts of Europe. To a group of entrepreneurs in Amsterdam the rain came as a blessing, as they used the extra water to brew beer. Serginho Roosblad has more to the story.
    Video

    Video Commerce Thrives on US-Mexico Border

    At the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this week, the party’s presumptive presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, is expected to attack proposals made by her opponent, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Last Friday, President Barack Obama hosted his Mexican counterpart, President Enrique Peña Nieto, to underscore the good relations between the two countries. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Tucson.
    Video

    Video Film Helps Save Ethiopian Children Thought to be Cursed

    'Omo Child' looks at effort of African man to stop killings of ‘mingi’ children
    Video

    Video London’s Financial Crown at Risk as Rivals Eye Brexit Opportunities

    By most measures, London rivals New York as the only true global financial center. But Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – so-called ‘Brexit’ – means the city could lose its right to sell services tariff-free across the bloc, risking its position as Europe’s financial headquarters. Already some banks have said they may shift operations to the mainland. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora