News / Asia

At ASEAN, China Rejects US 'Freeze'

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi during, ASEAN Regional Forum, Myanmar International Convention Centre, Naypyitaw, Aug. 9, 2014.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi during, ASEAN Regional Forum, Myanmar International Convention Centre, Naypyitaw, Aug. 9, 2014.
Ron Corben

China is dismissing U.S. calls for a freeze on "provocative acts" in disputed waters of the South China Sea.

Addressing reporters Saturday at a meeting of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) in Naypyidaw, Myanmar, also known as Burma, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi rejected calls by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to manage maritime disputes based on international law.

Calling the situation in the South China Sea stable, Wang restated China's position of protecting its regional sovereignty.

As "responsible great power," Wang said, "China is ready to maintain restraint, but for unreasonable provocative activities, China is bound to make a clear and firm reaction."

The United States has accused China of asserting itself militarily in territorial disputes with Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam, and the Philippines in the South China Sea, and in competing claims with Japan over a group of uninhabited islands northeast of Taiwan.

While at the conference, Kerry said ASEAN members needed to work together to manage tensions peacefully and that the organization has a unique responsibility to ensure security of critical global sea lanes and ports.

According to Carl Thayer, a defense analyst at Australia's University of New South Wales, Wang's dismissal of Kerry's comments, made with the backing of some ASEAN member states, only reaffirms China's long-established position on the South China Sea dispute resolution.

"ASEAN won't give a united position to China because they fear it will be rejected, and that China [will say] 'we want Laos, Cambodia, and everybody else to tell us what they think,'" he said, calling China's position on the South China Sea part of a "diplomatic game" designed to marginalize U.S. influence and create divisions within the ASEAN community.

"So they are playing quite well in that disarray and I just can't see China is serious in any of this," he said. 

ASEAN Secretary General Le Luong Minh of Vietnam said Kerry's proposal was not formally discussed, adding that mechanisms are already in place to address issues of land reclamation and building on disputed islands.

The Philippines also appeared to step back from earlier calls for a moratorium on so-called "provocative activities."

Aside from this weekend's ASEAN foreign ministers meeting, delegates are set to meet with representatives from "dialogue partner" countries, including Russia, Japan, India, Australia, the European Union as well as the U.S.

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Comment Sorting
by: commie from: china
August 12, 2014 5:59 PM
Get rid of the lawless and greedy communist out of peace loving ASEAN.

by: Lawrence from: Kwt
August 10, 2014 10:50 AM
You does'nt seem to know the structures and islands that China is building. Please read some news lately before commenting some things that you obviuosly dont know.
In Response

by: keith W from: Butner, NC
August 11, 2014 2:45 PM
Ok, so much hate! I do read news and watch it frequently each day! I will never say I am right or have correct views and I am always open to correction if I am wrong. I only comment on observations I see on the news now if I'm wrong then don't hate me, just correct me!

by: Sino-phobia from: rest of the world
August 10, 2014 1:55 AM
Every time, PRC invades neighboring countries, especially small and weak countries such as Vietnam, Philippines, Uighur, Mongolia, and Tibet. Provocative actions are always started by PRC, as rest of the world well know.
In Response

by: william li from: canada
August 11, 2014 10:52 AM
what did THE REST OF THE WORLD do when America invaded Iraq with fabricated excuses? what did they do when America bombed innocent villagers with drones in Pakistan and Afghanistan? may be China should copy it from America, just bomb viet and finos with drones! what do you say?

by: tran van hai from: usa
August 10, 2014 1:30 AM
Meanbill's words seem to come directly from the Chinese commies. He must have been paid to work as a mouthpiece for these Chinese commies. As a Vietnamese, I know more than anyone how vicious and how barbarious the Chinese aggressors are and how our people hate these Chinese invaders who built their country through stealing other countries' land. Yes, we do want the US involvement a million times more than the Chinese.

by: Keith W from: Butner, NC
August 09, 2014 10:24 PM
It is my opinion that China has the power over it's own territories and does not need to be told how or when they need to run those said territories. I personally think the US should back away from conflict of any nature and first protect our homeland and then work with other nations to forward their own technologies or have them advance our own. This is not 1960 anymore. This is 2014 and the US can not be so high and mighty that we let every opportunity to be a better nation pass us by. China is by far our biggest asset in the world today. Whether we like it or not, we need china.
In Response

by: william li from: canada
August 11, 2014 10:44 AM
a China fully controlled South China sea services better American interests, because only powerful China can keep this area in peace.
and America will always has the freedom of navigation. BTW, majority shipping is controlled by China now, 80% ships traveling in SCS belong to China. america doesn't need to be worried. there is no American ship traveling in SCS except warships.
In Response

by: Mike from: Canada
August 11, 2014 6:48 AM
U.S. is involved because freedom of navigation in South China Sea ( South of China not belong to China) is in interest of U.S. China is slowly creeping into others territories claiming 90% of South China, with no historical evidence but bullying its weaker neighbours into conceding their territories, Vietnam and Phillipines.

As China is U.S. biggest asset is a joke. China wants to replace U.S. as dominant power in Asia. U.S. sent all manufacturing jobs and China and made them more powerful and richer. China in return exports poison all around the world. I don't think U.S. needs China as China needs U.S. You must be Chinese national or some relations to Chinese.

by: meanbill from: USA
August 09, 2014 6:22 PM
EVERYTIME the US interferes in the politics of other countries, (they bring only violence, destruction, killings and wars, that just keep going on), and the (ASEAN) countries told Kerry and the US, they didn't need the US interference in solving "their" political problems, (but), Kerry still has the little islanders of the rising sun, to complain too, doesn't he?.....

LOOK at all the countries the US politically interfered in, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Syria, Yemen, and now Ukraine, (and now), would you really want the US interfering in your countries politics?..... REALLY?
In Response

by: earthling01 from: US
August 11, 2014 1:42 PM
"EVERYTIME" is a bit of an exaggeration. The US has played a role in promoting democracy and economic development throughout Asia and many countries mentioned above. US still has bases in Okinawa, for ex, to defend Japan from DPRK.
To the US's credit, it pulled out of Iraq, but has been forced back in against its own best interests. It is also on a path to troop reduction in Afghanistan, although the govt is slow to take on full self-defense.

China's role in Asia, on the other hand, is much more hostile and aggressive in that it is exploiting its neighbors' territories and natural resources. There is to internal conflict asking for Chinese aid; there are no terrorist attacks from VN, Laos etc inciting China to respond militarily. Hence, these invasive provocations are solely to promote China's own self-serving power grab in Asia. China has no intent to "leave" once their role is no longer needed.

I might also add that many scores of Americans openly oppose the US "wars" in Asia and Middle-East. And yet, where are the voices of Chinese citizens against China's military exploits?

This is the difference between Chinese and US "aggression".
In Response

by: william li from: canada
August 11, 2014 10:37 AM
well said!
@Hoang, without American oil and weapons, Japan couldn't even start the invasion to China. Japan invaded China in 1937, but until japan attacked pearl harbor in 1941, america did help China on the contrary was still supplying Japan with oil and weapons! America always support terrorists then shoot its own toe. America supported Japan before WWII, America supported Taliban and Saddam, America supported ISIS in Syria. and all those mad dogs bit america after. BTW it was Soviet army defeated Japanese army on China's land. American soldiers never landed on China! the RED army crushed Japan like a baby!
In Response

by: Dustin from: Utah
August 10, 2014 11:11 AM
Haha! Totally agree. I don't even want the US messing around in the US's politics!
In Response

by: Hoang from: Canada
August 10, 2014 6:52 AM
Meanbill from China,
Without U.S. interference in world war 2, China would still be a colony of the Empire of Japan. China during war 2 was crying for U.S. to come free China from Japan.
In Response

by: Anonymous
August 10, 2014 12:41 AM
Kerry sticking his tongue out. He must be going after the teenager vote.
In Response

by: Anonymous
August 09, 2014 9:01 PM

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