News / Africa

Kerry Tries to Arrange Kiir-Machar Talks

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry holds a media conference praising oil-rich Angola's leadership for solving  conflicts on the African continent, in Luanda, Angola, May 5, 2014.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with civil society leaders at the U.S. Chief of Mission Residence in Luanda, Angola, May 4, 2014.
  • Angola's Foreign Minister Georges Rebelo Chicoti, right, walks with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry prior to their meeting at the Finance Ministry in Luanda, Angola, May 5, 2014.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry walks by the Congo River near the U.S. Chief of Mission Residence in Kinshasa, DRC, May 3, 2014.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and entrepreneur Patricia Nzolantima point at an ultrasound machine during a tour of a Sustainable Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa medical supply store in Kinshasa, DRC, May 3, 2014.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry applauds a local dancer prior to speaking prior to speaking about U.S. policy in Africa at the Gullele Botanic Garden in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 3, 2014.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Olusegun Obasanjo, chairman of the African Union's South Sudan Commission of Inquiry, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 2, 2014. 
  • South Sudan's President Salva Kiir chats with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at the president's office in Juba, South Sudan, May 2, 2014. 
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with civil society leaders at the U.S. embassy to compel authorities on both sides of the fighting to put a stop to the violence, Juba, South Sudan, May 2, 2014. 

     
  • South Sudanese Foreign Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin welcomes U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry upon his arrival at Juba International Airport, South Sudan, May 2, 2014. 
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Africa
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry traveled to South Sudan Friday to meet with President Salva Kiir in hopes of arranging talks to end four-months of violence that has displaced hundreds of thousands of civilians

The secretary visited South Sudan's capital of Juba before returning to Addis Ababa later in the day.

Kerry is trying to help end violence that has displaced hundreds of thousands of civilians and now threatens widespread famine.

He is trying to set up a meeting in the Ethiopian capital next week that would be the first face-to-face meeting between President Kiir and former vice president Machar since this fighting started.

"This meeting of Riek Machar and President Kiir is critical to the ability to be able to really engage in a serious way as to how the cessation of hostilities agreement will now once and for all really be implemented, and how that can be augmented by the discussions regarding a transition government," Kerry said.

Fighting broke out in late December, soon after the Kiir government accused Machar of trying to seize power.

Kerry said both men need to condemn attacks against civilians that he said show "disturbing leading indicators of the kind of ethnic, tribal, targeted, nationalistic killings" that "present a very serious challenge to the international community with respect to the question of genocide."

Kerry met for more than an hour with Kiir and said the South Sudanese leader agreed to talks in Addis Ababa.

Kerry telephoned Machar on his return to the Ethiopian capital to brief him on his visit to Juba and to urge him to engage in "meaningful political dialogue." It is unclear whether the rebel leader agreed to take part.

If those talks happen, Human Rights Watch deputy Washington director Sarah Margon said there must be a greater focus on protecting civilians.
 
"It's not going to just be a political negotiation in Addis detached from what's happening on the ground," Margoni said. "Obviously the fighting is going on.  And we need to think collectively about how they fight, what the role of civilians are, which obviously should not be stuck in the middle of any fighting."
 
Kerry said the United States is working with regional leaders and the African Union to get as many as 2,500 African troops to South Sudan "as rapidly as possible" to separate combatants and protect civilians under a stronger United Nations mandate.
 
The Obama administration also has in place a mechanism for sanctions against those responsible for the violence.

But a travel ban and assets freeze would be far more effective if joined by neighboring Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda, which Kerry said Thursday "accepted the responsibility for also doing sanctions."
 
While in the South Sudanese capital, Kerry also met with civil society leaders, U.N. officials, and representatives of those displaced by the fighting.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Charles Onyango from: Kenya
May 03, 2014 11:23 AM
Good Work Mr.John Kerry.The Two Leaders Must Mostly Focus On How To Protect The South Sudanese Civilians In Their Talks.


by: ali bab from: new york
May 02, 2014 2:16 PM
too little . too late . the whole world ignore the people of south Sudan whom are victim of genocide committed by northern part of the country .the genocide killed million of people and left faction whom are fighting for power .they do have oil .but they do not the management skill to develop the country

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