News / Middle East

Kerry: Iran Nuke Deal a Good First Step

Kerry: Iran Nuke Deal a Good First Stepi
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November 24, 2013 10:20 PM
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says a nuclear accord with Iran will halt Tehran’s march to atomic weapons capacity and provide a window to negotiate a final agreement. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, the Obama administration is attempting to convince skeptics at home and abroad and the preliminary deal is good for America and its allies.
Michael Bowman
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says a nuclear accord with Iran will halt Tehran’s march to atomic weapons capacity and provide a window to negotiate a final agreement.  The Obama administration is attempting to convince skeptics at home and abroad that the preliminary deal is good for America and its allies.

In a media blitz on U.S. airwaves Sunday, Secretary Kerry described the accord as a first step towards a possible peaceful resolution of Iran's nuclear ambitions.  Appearing on CBS’ Face the Nation program, Kerry detailed restrictions Tehran has agreed to.

"They will have to destroy the higher-enriched uranium they have, which is critical to being able to build a bomb," he said. "Once they have destroyed that, they only have lower-enriched uranium.  They are not allowed under this agreement to build additional enrichment facilities.  We will have restrictions on the centrifuges, which are critical for enrichment.”

The secretary stressed the agreement mandates rigorous verification.

“It is not based on trust.  It is based on verification," he said. "It is based on your ability to know what is happening.  So you do not have to trust the people you are dealing with.  You have to have a mechanism in place whereby you know exactly what you are getting, and you know exactly what they are doing.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu blasted the agreement as a “historic mistake.” 

Appearing on ABC’s This Week program, Republican Senator Saxby Chambliss said the accord falls short of the international community’s overriding goal.

“Nothing in what Secretary Kerry just said moves us in the direction of preventing Iran from developing a nuclear weapon,” said Chambliss.

The senator also objected to any relaxation of economic pressure against Iran.

“Now is just not the time to ease sanctions when they are working,” he said.

Late Saturday, President Barack Obama described sanctions relief as “modest” and subject to cancellation if Tehran does not meet its commitments.  Secretary Kerry said the accord is far preferable to having Iran unconstrained in its nuclear activities.

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by: D. Ahlswede from: Nebraska
November 26, 2013 9:45 AM
What entity is responsible for verifying that both sides comply with the terms of the new agreement and why should the public place trust in that process? Will the verifiers do a better job this time than they apparently did a few years ago, when the government of Iran started producing enriched uranium it was ostensibly not legally allowed to manufacture in the first place?

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
November 25, 2013 1:24 AM
The comment made by Kerry, "We stand by Israel 100 percent", seems partly rhetoric to calm down Netanyahu' anger. 5 +1 side must be relieved to have been able to draw some compromise from Iran. I wonder if Iranian nationalist would surge against this deal and undermine present government. If not so, this deal would be acceptable for Iran itself.

by: Dr. James S. from: Los Alamos
November 24, 2013 11:06 PM
since the cat is out of the bag... let me tell you what Israel has... it does not have an atomic bomb!!! if fact we took all of their Atomic bombs out of Israel in the early 90's. they had them since the late 50's... What they do have is an arsenal of hydrogen pulse thermonuclear fusion devise which is as sophisticated, and some in the know say, even more sophisticated than our own. Either way, they are light years ahead in terms of R&D. having said that, I don't believe for a second that they will allow Iran to undermine Saudi Arabia or Kuwait or Egypt or Jordan or any of their Sunni Arab neighbors. Just don't underestimate Arab stupidity... the Arabs will still chant and vilify Israel... still, you have to "forgive them; for they know not what they do..." Luke 23:34

by: mohdil from: aUSTRALIA
November 24, 2013 7:57 PM
... and now for peace and security for all in the middle east, including Israel, it is time to curb Israeli chemical, biological and nuclear weaponry

by: Col J. Cooper from: USA
November 24, 2013 6:06 PM
Off and on, for fifteen years, i have worked with the Israelis on some military projects. I had come out of the experience with a firm and unshakable awareness that they are, by far, the best intelligence analysts in the world... may be second only to US... but indisputably the best. And if they say something - I listen. It is a gave mistake for Obama to have spurned Israel - our closest friends and allies - really compatriots. Israel and US constitute a unified cultural community. And I just know that time will prove them right. I just hope it will not be too late for the world.
In Response

by: VERNON Mullet from: USA
November 26, 2013 9:53 AM
What words of Wisdom

by: Tony Bellchambers from: London
November 24, 2013 2:21 PM
“Next key international move is to decommission and dismantle all Israel's hundreds of nuclear warheads and its fleet of cruise missile submarines patrolling the Mediterranean in order to achieve a Nuclear Weapons Free Zone throughout the Middle East. Only then will a future nuclear war be averted within the next five years.”
In Response

by: Hey Tony from: Wake UP
November 25, 2013 7:09 AM
yes, that would be nice... but just before that beautiful rosy future, shouldn't we be allowed to build Churches in Mecca?? and maybe stop the Iranians from chanting "Death to America.." ??? and having the Hizbullah become Catholic Priests...? and having Russia renounce its Mafia State brutality... and Al Qaida become local car salesmen... Oh, wouldn't that be beautiful...

by: Dr. Tamalin M.d. from: D.C.
November 24, 2013 1:30 PM
Kerry has LIED before about Syria, you trust him about Iran???


Recently Secretary of State John Kerry opened his speech by describing the horrors victims of the Syrian chemical weapon attack suffered, including twitching, spasms and difficulty breathing.


Attempting to drive the point home, Kerry referenced a photograph used by the BBC illustrating a child jumping over hundreds of dead bodies covered in white shrouds.

“We saw rows of dead lined up in burial shrouds, the white linen unstained by a single drop of blood,” said Kerry.

The photo was meant to depict victims who allegedly succumbed to the effects of chemical weapons via Assad’s regime. However, the photograph used in this context has been exposed as a fake. It had been taken in 2003 in Iraq and was not related to Syrian deaths whatsoever and was later retracted.

The Secretary of State announced the US will continue “negotiations” with Congress and the American people.

The decision came after UK Parliament voted no to military action against Syria , refusing to accompany the US in a missile strike against the Middle Eastern nation.

Germany also voiced their opposition to Syria military intervention saying they have “not considered it” and “will not be considering it.”

France, however, released statements saying they intend to act alongside the US in an attempt to “punish” Syria for the alleged chemical weapons attack.

Despite numerous allies’ refusal to get involved, Kerry argued “Many friends stand ready to respond.”

Kerry alleged that not just one, but several chemical weapon attacks have occurred. An attack in the Damascus suburb of Ghouta killed 1,429 Syrians, including 426 children. However, facts reveals that the “international aid group Doctors Without Borders reported 355 people were killed in the attack , not the wildly exaggerated figure cited by Kerry.”

The Secretary of State said the US government has “high confidence” Assad carried out the attack, affirming military intervention would be “common sense.”

He referred to the attack as an “indiscriminate, inconceivable and horrific act,” claiming a Syrian senior regime official admitted responsibility. However, he offered no hard evidence backing this claim.

While Kerry blamed Syria for blocking and delaying the UN chemical weapons investigation, a report revealed the “Obama administration told UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon that ‘there wasn’t adequate security for the U.N. inspectors to visit the affected areas to conduct their mission,’ a clear warning (or a blatant threat) that inspectors should pull out entirely.”

“Even when Syria allowed UN inspectors to enter the affected region, the Obama administration responded that it was ‘too late,’ and that the evidence could have been destroyed.”

Unsurprisingly, Kerry failed to mention US’s true position of funding the Syrian rebels, leaving the uninformed public incompetent to form an accurate opinion.

The good news is for the first time in over two hundred years a British Prime Minister lost a vote on war since 1782, when Parliament effectively conceded American independence by voting against further fighting to crush the colony’s rebellion.

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