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Kerry: Lives May be Lost Due to Snowden's Betrayal

Kerry: Lives May be Lost Due to Snowden's Betrayali
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June 25, 2013 1:27 PM
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry warns there will be consequences for countries that help former U.S. intelligence analyst Edward Snowden avoid arrest for disclosing secret details of U.S. government surveillance of telephone and Internet activities. VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns has the story.
Kerry: Lives May be Lost Due to Snowden's Betrayal
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry warns there will be consequences for countries that help former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden avoid arrest for disclosing secret details of U.S. government surveillance of telephone and Internet activities.

With Snowden on the run from Hong Kong, Secretary of State John Kerry said there will be consequences for countries that help him escape U.S. justice.

"All appropriate countries have been notified with respect to the status, his status, legally, and that is the appropriate step to take, to put them on notice that he is an indicted fellow, he is an indicted individual, indicted with three felony accounts and that he is wanted by the legal process of the United States," said Kerry.

Ecuador is considering Snowden's asylum request. Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño said Snowden believes he would not receive a fair trial in the United States.

"The man who intended to expose acts that affects the fundamental liberties of all people now finds himself persecuted by those very people who should offer an explanation to the governments and the citizens of the world regarding the claims made by Mr. Snowden," said Patiño.

But in an interview with VOA, Kerry said Snowden has put counterterrorism at risk.

"He has put individuals at risk. And it may well be that lives will be lost in the United States because terrorists now have knowledge of something that they need to avoid that they didn't have knowledge of before he did this," said Kerry.

Snowden supporters say he is standing up for the right to privacy and exposing government misconduct in the collection of phone and Internet records.

"All governments, most governments do it, and China does it, the U.S. is doing it. So I think what he did was actually a very brave thing. He was willing to give up everything for that," said John Wakefield.

Kerry told VOA that Snowden is not a whistleblower like those who helped expose secret U.S. policies during the Vietnam War.

"He has betrayed his country because he took an oath. He swore that he would uphold the secrecy. He was given access to documents based on that trust and he violated that trust. And he hasn't violated it in any way similar, nothing similar to Daniel Ellsberg or somebody who was revealing a government who is actually lying or that had a completely distorted view of something going on. This man just took real information and put it out there because he happens to believe something that is not in fact justified by the facts," he said.

In an interview with the Guardian newspaper, Snowden said he wanted to help people decide for themselves if the surveillance is warranted.

"I think that the public is owed an explanation of the motivations behind the people who made these disclosures that are outside of the democratic model," said Snowden.

But Kerry says the surveillance program protects the right to live free from terrorism.

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by: Jerome Hamilton from: USA
June 26, 2013 9:36 AM
Kerry and the other US politicians involved betrayed America by spying on Americans through PRISM; Snowden simply did what a human being with a conscience should have done by disclosing the betrayal of those people. To accuse Snowden of risking the lives of others deliberately misleads the world, another act of betrayal by those same politicians.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
June 25, 2013 7:56 PM
I would like to see a written contract Snoden exchanged with ASP. I also would like to know if it is constitutionally illegal for ASP to survey phone and e-mail personal histories except for their contents. Both Snoden and ASP should be judged purely legally.

Anyway I suppose federal government probably have failed to get any clue of terrorism against its announcement because terrorists would plot shrewdly enough to get through such a transparent investigation. And I think none of American people surveyed their histories got substantially hurted. I think this incident perhaps is not an exaggerated matter as protection from terrorism versus protection of privacy.

But I can say Snoden played a role that makes federal government keep away from investigation to pesonal contents on communication which might be done if he did not reveal this incident.


by: Hugh Janus from: Australia
June 25, 2013 7:03 PM
Dear America, no one in the world at large is in the least bit impressed with your politician's huffing, puffing and blustering.

No one believes that security (your own nor ours) has been compromised by Snowden.
You have been caught with your infantile little hands in the cookie jar and you are trying to blame someone else.
Grow up a bit, FFS, and accept you are wrong, very, very wrong.


by: Fred from: Ca
June 25, 2013 10:44 AM
People should realize that it is a treasonable offense for someone who takes a secrecy oath to reveal those secrets.


by: Ashikawa from: Japan
June 25, 2013 10:43 AM
Snowden is brave. I really respect him beacuse he did that althought he know well that USA have power.


by: vekiegy from: indian
June 25, 2013 6:00 AM
is it necessary to use illegal way to protect us from terrorism?


by: Igor from: Russia
June 24, 2013 10:50 PM
Snowden is a hero and needs to be protected world wide. He is so brave to lay bare the hypocrisy of those who are doing dirty things in the name of anti-terrorism.
You cannot violate the basic human rights just to say that you are protecting human beings. You cannot put your nose into every one's private life and exploit their privacy in order to do something harmful to them. He is not a betrayer because he has been betrayed first by the CIA. People cannot say you are a betrayer if you abandon an evil organization after proving taht it is evil.


by: DORAI RAJ L from: Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.
June 24, 2013 10:14 PM
Basically we should know what privacy is at all. Information of a person regarding his business formula, money transactions, health conditions, credits and debts, result of ones attempts as a business man, professional, student, or a matter affects ones life. These are private healthy matters that should never be revealed publicly. And more over, one's love affairs with some one else, sexual relationship etc. are private but trivial. Here, it is notable that American Surveillance Program(ASP) does never require these information to know with interest.

It only needs to know whether any communication transfers any information that is a threat to the tranquility of the great America or international community. More over, ASP does not reveal the information to anybody else what ever it is, especially, it does not care at all if the information got through ASP is a personal secret of a citizen until it is a threat. So, ASP is not anything harms the citizens ever. It is remarkable that no business men or trader, milliner have opposed to ASP. Only the common citizens who transfer only 'trivial private matters' oppose this ASP.

I think, who all oppose ASP fail to be responsible citizens of America. Generally people care that their communication regarding sexual activities, love etc. should not be traced by others. This is the fear of common citizens. The US govt. should never care for these protests because when there is a threat to the security of the nation, these citizens will hide themselves in their homes and the entire responsibilities should be borne by the government. So, leaving these trivial protests, GO AHEAD!


by: Anonymous
June 24, 2013 9:44 PM
Snowden = paid Chinese spy, directed to distract from China's state-sponsored cyberthefts just before Obama and Jinping's cybersecurity meeting.

In Response

by: earlallenboek from: N. CAl
June 26, 2013 10:13 AM
more likely the other way around.


by: Brandt from: Nashville
June 24, 2013 9:27 PM
Snowden is a hero and a patriot in my book. We live in an age where the civil liberties our forefathers fought so hard for are being eroded by the day. Freedom of Press, Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Assembly are mere ghostly images of their original intent. We’ve woken up to an Orwellian Society of Fear where anyone is at the mercy of being labeled a terrorist for standing up for rights we took for granted just over a decade ago.

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