News / USA

    Kerry: Lives May be Lost Due to Snowden's Betrayal

    Kerry: Lives May be Lost Due to Snowden's Betrayali
    X
    June 25, 2013 1:27 PM
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry warns there will be consequences for countries that help former U.S. intelligence analyst Edward Snowden avoid arrest for disclosing secret details of U.S. government surveillance of telephone and Internet activities. VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns has the story.
    Kerry: Lives May be Lost Due to Snowden's Betrayal
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry warns there will be consequences for countries that help former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden avoid arrest for disclosing secret details of U.S. government surveillance of telephone and Internet activities.

    With Snowden on the run from Hong Kong, Secretary of State John Kerry said there will be consequences for countries that help him escape U.S. justice.

    "All appropriate countries have been notified with respect to the status, his status, legally, and that is the appropriate step to take, to put them on notice that he is an indicted fellow, he is an indicted individual, indicted with three felony accounts and that he is wanted by the legal process of the United States," said Kerry.

    Ecuador is considering Snowden's asylum request. Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño said Snowden believes he would not receive a fair trial in the United States.

    "The man who intended to expose acts that affects the fundamental liberties of all people now finds himself persecuted by those very people who should offer an explanation to the governments and the citizens of the world regarding the claims made by Mr. Snowden," said Patiño.

    But in an interview with VOA, Kerry said Snowden has put counterterrorism at risk.

    "He has put individuals at risk. And it may well be that lives will be lost in the United States because terrorists now have knowledge of something that they need to avoid that they didn't have knowledge of before he did this," said Kerry.

    Snowden supporters say he is standing up for the right to privacy and exposing government misconduct in the collection of phone and Internet records.

    "All governments, most governments do it, and China does it, the U.S. is doing it. So I think what he did was actually a very brave thing. He was willing to give up everything for that," said John Wakefield.

    Kerry told VOA that Snowden is not a whistleblower like those who helped expose secret U.S. policies during the Vietnam War.

    "He has betrayed his country because he took an oath. He swore that he would uphold the secrecy. He was given access to documents based on that trust and he violated that trust. And he hasn't violated it in any way similar, nothing similar to Daniel Ellsberg or somebody who was revealing a government who is actually lying or that had a completely distorted view of something going on. This man just took real information and put it out there because he happens to believe something that is not in fact justified by the facts," he said.

    In an interview with the Guardian newspaper, Snowden said he wanted to help people decide for themselves if the surveillance is warranted.

    "I think that the public is owed an explanation of the motivations behind the people who made these disclosures that are outside of the democratic model," said Snowden.

    But Kerry says the surveillance program protects the right to live free from terrorism.

    You May Like

    New EU Asylum Rules Could Boost Rightists

    New regulations will seek to correct EU failures in dealing with migrant crisis, most notably inability to get member states to absorb a total of 160,000 refugees

    More Political Turmoil Likely in Iraq as Iran Waits in the Wings

    Analysts warn that Tehran, even though it may not be engineering the Sadrist protests in Baghdad, is seeking to leverage its influence on its neighbor

    Goodbye Ketchup, Hello Sriracha!

    How immigrants are triggering a great transformation in American cuisine

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 3
        Next 
    by: Jerome Hamilton from: USA
    June 26, 2013 9:36 AM
    Kerry and the other US politicians involved betrayed America by spying on Americans through PRISM; Snowden simply did what a human being with a conscience should have done by disclosing the betrayal of those people. To accuse Snowden of risking the lives of others deliberately misleads the world, another act of betrayal by those same politicians.

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    June 25, 2013 7:56 PM
    I would like to see a written contract Snoden exchanged with ASP. I also would like to know if it is constitutionally illegal for ASP to survey phone and e-mail personal histories except for their contents. Both Snoden and ASP should be judged purely legally.

    Anyway I suppose federal government probably have failed to get any clue of terrorism against its announcement because terrorists would plot shrewdly enough to get through such a transparent investigation. And I think none of American people surveyed their histories got substantially hurted. I think this incident perhaps is not an exaggerated matter as protection from terrorism versus protection of privacy.

    But I can say Snoden played a role that makes federal government keep away from investigation to pesonal contents on communication which might be done if he did not reveal this incident.

    by: Hugh Janus from: Australia
    June 25, 2013 7:03 PM
    Dear America, no one in the world at large is in the least bit impressed with your politician's huffing, puffing and blustering.

    No one believes that security (your own nor ours) has been compromised by Snowden.
    You have been caught with your infantile little hands in the cookie jar and you are trying to blame someone else.
    Grow up a bit, FFS, and accept you are wrong, very, very wrong.

    by: Fred from: Ca
    June 25, 2013 10:44 AM
    People should realize that it is a treasonable offense for someone who takes a secrecy oath to reveal those secrets.

    by: Ashikawa from: Japan
    June 25, 2013 10:43 AM
    Snowden is brave. I really respect him beacuse he did that althought he know well that USA have power.

    by: vekiegy from: indian
    June 25, 2013 6:00 AM
    is it necessary to use illegal way to protect us from terrorism?

    by: Igor from: Russia
    June 24, 2013 10:50 PM
    Snowden is a hero and needs to be protected world wide. He is so brave to lay bare the hypocrisy of those who are doing dirty things in the name of anti-terrorism.
    You cannot violate the basic human rights just to say that you are protecting human beings. You cannot put your nose into every one's private life and exploit their privacy in order to do something harmful to them. He is not a betrayer because he has been betrayed first by the CIA. People cannot say you are a betrayer if you abandon an evil organization after proving taht it is evil.

    by: DORAI RAJ L from: Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.
    June 24, 2013 10:14 PM
    Basically we should know what privacy is at all. Information of a person regarding his business formula, money transactions, health conditions, credits and debts, result of ones attempts as a business man, professional, student, or a matter affects ones life. These are private healthy matters that should never be revealed publicly. And more over, one's love affairs with some one else, sexual relationship etc. are private but trivial. Here, it is notable that American Surveillance Program(ASP) does never require these information to know with interest.

    It only needs to know whether any communication transfers any information that is a threat to the tranquility of the great America or international community. More over, ASP does not reveal the information to anybody else what ever it is, especially, it does not care at all if the information got through ASP is a personal secret of a citizen until it is a threat. So, ASP is not anything harms the citizens ever. It is remarkable that no business men or trader, milliner have opposed to ASP. Only the common citizens who transfer only 'trivial private matters' oppose this ASP.

    I think, who all oppose ASP fail to be responsible citizens of America. Generally people care that their communication regarding sexual activities, love etc. should not be traced by others. This is the fear of common citizens. The US govt. should never care for these protests because when there is a threat to the security of the nation, these citizens will hide themselves in their homes and the entire responsibilities should be borne by the government. So, leaving these trivial protests, GO AHEAD!

    by: Anonymous
    June 24, 2013 9:44 PM
    Snowden = paid Chinese spy, directed to distract from China's state-sponsored cyberthefts just before Obama and Jinping's cybersecurity meeting.
    In Response

    by: earlallenboek from: N. CAl
    June 26, 2013 10:13 AM
    more likely the other way around.

    by: Brandt from: Nashville
    June 24, 2013 9:27 PM
    Snowden is a hero and a patriot in my book. We live in an age where the civil liberties our forefathers fought so hard for are being eroded by the day. Freedom of Press, Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Assembly are mere ghostly images of their original intent. We’ve woken up to an Orwellian Society of Fear where anyone is at the mercy of being labeled a terrorist for standing up for rights we took for granted just over a decade ago.
    Comments page of 3
        Next 

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Tensions Rising Ahead of South China Sea Rulingi
    X
    May 03, 2016 5:16 PM
    As the Philippines awaits an international arbitration ruling on a challenge to China's claims to nearly all of the South China Sea, it is already becoming clear that regardless of which way the decision goes, the dispute is intensifying. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
    Video

    Video Tensions Rising Ahead of South China Sea Ruling

    As the Philippines awaits an international arbitration ruling on a challenge to China's claims to nearly all of the South China Sea, it is already becoming clear that regardless of which way the decision goes, the dispute is intensifying. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
    Video

    Video Painting Captures President Lincoln Assassination Aftermath

    A newly restored painting captures the moments following President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination in 1865. It was recently unveiled at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, where America’s 16th president was shot. It is the only known painting by an eyewitness that captures the horror of that fateful night. VOA’s Julie Taboh tells us more about the painting and what it took to restore it to its original condition.
    Video

    Video Elephant Summit Results in $5M in Pledges, Presidential Support

    Attended and supported by three African presidents, a three-day anti-poaching summit has concluded in Kenya, resulting in $5 million in pledges and a united message to the world that elephants are worth more alive than dead. The summit culminated at the Nairobi National Park with the largest ivory burn in history. VOA’s Jill Craig attended the summit and has this report about the outcomes.
    Video

    Video Displaced By War, Syrian Artist Finds Inspiration Abroad

    Saudi-born Syrian painter Mohammad Zaza is among the millions who fled their home for an uncertain future after Syria's civil war broke out. Since fleeing Syria, Zaza has lived in Lebanon, Egypt, Jordan and now Turkey where his latest exhibition, “Earth is Blue like an Orange,” opened in Istanbul. He spoke with VOA about how being displaced by the Syrian civil war has affected the country's artists.
    Video

    Video Ethiopia’s Drought Takes Toll on Children

    Ethiopia is dealing with its worst drought in decades, thanks to El Nino weather patterns. An estimated 10 million people urgently need food aid. Six million of them are children, whose development may be compromised without sufficient help, Marthe van der Wolf reports for VOA from the Metahara district.
    Video

    Video Little Havana - a Slice of Cuban Culture in Florida

    Hispanic culture permeates everything in Miami’s Little Havana area: elderly men playing dominoes as they discuss politics, cigar rollers deep at work, or Cuban exiles talking with presidential candidates at a Cuban coffee window. With the recent rapprochement between Cuba and United States, one can only expect stronger ties between South Florida and Cuba.
    Video

    Video California Republicans Weigh Presidential Choices Amid Protests

    Republican presidential candidates have been wooing local party leaders in California, a state that could be decisive in selecting the party's nominee for U.S. president. VOA's Mike O’Sullivan reports delegates to the California party convention have been evaluating choices, while front-runner Donald Trump drew hundreds of raucous protesters Friday.
    Video

    Video Kurdish Football Team Helps War-Torn City Cope

    With the conflict still raging across much of Turkey’s predominantly Kurdish southeast, between the rebel PKK and the Turkish state, many Kurds are trying to escape the turmoil by focusing on the success of their football team Amedspor in Diyarbakir. The club is increasingly becoming a symbol for Kurds, not only in Diyarbakir but beyond. Dorian Jones reports from southeast Turkey.
    Video

    Video ‘The Lights of Africa’ - Through the Eyes of 54 Artists

    An exhibition bringing together the work of 54 African artists, one from each country, is touring the continent after debuting at COP21 in Paris. Called "Lumières d'Afrique," the show centers on access to electricity and, more figuratively, ideas that enlighten. Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, the exhibition's first stop.
    Video

    Video Florida’s Weeki Wachee ‘Mermaids’ Make a Splash

    Since 1947, ‘mermaids’ have fascinated tourists at central Florida’s Weeki Wachee Springs State Park with their fluid movements and synchronized ballet. Performing underwater has its challenges, including cold temperatures and a steady current, as VOA’s Lin Yang and Joseph Mok report.
    Video

    Video Somali, African Union Forces Face Resurgent Al-Shabab

    The Islamic State terror group claimed its first attack in Somalia earlier this week, though the claim has not been verified by forces on the ground. Meanwhile, al-Shabab militants have stepped up their attacks as Somalia prepares for elections later this year. Henry Ridgwell reports there are growing frustrations among Somalia’s Western backers over the country’s slow progress in forming its own armed forces to establish security after 25 years of chaos.
    Video

    Video Nigerians Feel Bite of Buhari Economic Policy

    Despite the global drop in the price of oil, Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has refused to allow the country's currency to devalue, leading to a shortage of foreign exchange. Chris Stein reports from Lagos businessmen and consumers are feeling the impact as the country deals with a severe fuel shortage.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora