News / Middle East

Kerry: Egyptian Leaders Need to Restore Stability

Kerry: Egyptian Leaders Need to Restore Stabilityi
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July 18, 2013 12:57 AM
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says Egypt's new interim leaders need to restore stability following the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi. He told Arab League foreign ministers in Jordan that the Obama administration is not rushing to declare this a coup -- a legal distinction that would affect U.S. aid to the country. VOA State Department correspondent Scott Stearns reports from the Jordanian capital.
— U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says Egypt's new interim leaders need to restore stability following the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi. He told Arab League foreign ministers in Jordan that the Obama administration is not rushing to declare this a coup, an important legal distinction that would affect U.S. aid to Egypt. 
 
Kerry says Egypt is facing an "extremely complex and difficult situation." 
 
"Very clearly, order needs to be restored to the streets, stability needs to be restored, violence needs to be ended, rights need to be protected, jobs need to be created, and the country needs to be able to return to normal business, hopefully," he said. 
 
He says the United States wants to see everyone participate in a political transition to move the country forward on a democratic path without fear of retribution. 
 
"We are concerned about political arrests, and we're concerned about the freedom of people to be able to participate because we think that's an important part of the restoration of the heart and soul of Egypt," he said. 
 
President Morsi remains under arrest as do other leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood, which is rejecting the authority of an interim administration that took power early this month. That transitional authority includes army chief Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, who ousted Morsi and is now deputy prime minister. It has no members from Islamist parties. 
 
Jordanian Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh has met with those interim leaders and says the political and constitutional process "is very much on track." 
 
"There's a constitutional process that is taking them in the right direction, which is forward, and in a timelined, benchmarked fashion," he said. 
 
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a joint news conference with Jordan's Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh (not seen) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Amman Jul. 17, 2013.U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a joint news conference with Jordan's Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh (not seen) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Amman Jul. 17, 2013.
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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a joint news conference with Jordan's Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh (not seen) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Amman Jul. 17, 2013.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a joint news conference with Jordan's Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh (not seen) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Amman Jul. 17, 2013.
Speaking to reporters in Amman alongside the Jordanian foreign minister, Kerry said Washington has made clear its "very deep concern" about Egypt's armed forces removing President Morsi and suspending the constitution but is in no "rush to judgment" to declare his ouster a coup. 
 
"We need to take the time necessary because of the complexity of this situation to evaluate what has taken place, to review all of our requirements under the law, and to make it consistent with our policy objectives," he said. 
 
U.S. law requires the Obama administration to stop its more than $1.5 billion in annual aid if it decides this was a coup. 
 
"What complicates it obviously is that you had an extraordinary situation in Egypt of life and death, of the potential of civil war and enormous violence, and you now have a constitutional process proceeding forward very rapidly. So we have to measure all of those facts against the law," he said. 
 
Foreign Minister Judeh offered his opinion on the question, saying a military coup is when the military takes over, and that is not what happened here. Instead, he says soldiers intervened "to put the constitutional process back on track." 
 
"And I think that we've got to give them the benefit of the doubt. They know best. The military in Egypt has been the guarantor of peace and stability in many twists and turns in Egypt's contemporary history," he said. 
 
In their meetings with Arab League foreign ministers, Kerry and Judeh also discussed the war in Syria and efforts to resume Israeli/Palestinian peace talks on a two-state solution. 

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by: sara from: ca
July 17, 2013 11:20 PM
America support democracy in Egypt, Bahrain and Syria.


by: Michael Guy from: Canonsburg, PA
July 17, 2013 10:25 PM
The Sunni oil sheiks of Qatar, Riyadh and the Persian Gulf are the financiers and controllers of the various wahhabi jihadist sects rife in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iraq and throughout the world. The oil princes of the Persian gulf have sent their "old men of the mountain" assassins to kill all Shia, Americans, Hindus and other kaffirs ever since Mogadishu, the USS Cole and 9-11. Their goal is a one worl Sunni Caliphate and eradication of all shia led nations, like Libya and soon, Iran Because America needs cheap oil and use of dollars as petro currency. These Muslim nobles also own much of our national debt. These sheiks manipulate and control the indebted and bribed Western politicians and bureaucrats like President Obama, John Kerry and Hillary clinton. Even though 100% of the military's casualties and 80% of all terror in Africa, India and the rest of the world was commited by the jihadist monsters of the sunni oil sheiks. But what do you expect of the Democratic Party, many of them, like John Kerry. also supported Ho Chi Minh during the Vietnam war


by: &*8gyTF from: DC, WASHINGTON
July 17, 2013 4:20 PM
German Ambassador to Egypt Michael Bock has clarified his country's position during a small press meeting attended by Ahram Online Wednesday at the German Embassy in Cairo following a contentious statement made by the German foreign ministry calling for the release of deposed president Mohamed Morsi.The statement was widely condemned among Egyptians amidst ongoing political upheaval between supporters and opponents of Morsi’s removal.
"We call for an end to the restrictions on Mr Morsi's whereabouts and suggest a trusted institution be granted access to Morsi," stated a German foreign ministry spokesman Friday, identifying the International Committee of the Red Cross as a credible body for the task.Ambassador Bock reiterated the same sentiments on Morsi's detention and the intervention of a trustworthy institution. The ambassador highlighted that the ministry's statement was selectively quoted and that important parts of its statement were disregarded by the media.When questioned on the rationale behind seeking Morsi's release, Ambassador Bock said that unwarranted political arrests of Morsi and Muslim Brotherhood figures would further alienate the Islamist organisation and push it underground. Such isolation would likely harden their heroic status among supporters, which may have dangerous repercussions.
"Morsi's release is useful for the country's re-democratisation. The judiciary should rapidly determine a verdict. Is there a case against him or not?" Bock asked, elaborating that the German government is yet to get a response from the prosecutor general in this regard, adding that using judicial channels as a means to exact political revenge would be unwise.


by: $567trf from: DC
July 17, 2013 4:06 PM
Cairo, Qahirah - EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said Wednesday that she regretted not having been able to meet Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi on a visit to Cairo.

She called for his immediate release from the custody he has been kept in since just hours after the military toppled him on July 3 following nationwide street protests against him.

“I believe he should be released. I was assured he is well. I would have liked to see him,” Ashton told reporters.

During her visit, Ashton met the country's new leaders, including interim President Adly Mansour, prime minister Hazem al-Beblawi and the general behind the coup, army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

She said she had been able to meet officials of the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), the political wing of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood, many of whose leaders have been detained.

She said she also met representatives of Tamarod, the grass-roots movement behind the mass protests that led up to Morsi's overthrow.

On a visit to Cairo on Monday and Tuesday, US Under Secretary of State William Burns did not meet Muslim Brotherhood representatives and was snubbed by Tamarod.

Senior FJP official Amr Darrag said it had been the EU who had sought the meeting.

“The delegation didn't come to ask the EU anything, the meeting took place at Ashton's request,” he told the state MENA news agency.

Ashton told Egypt's interim leaders that the EU wanted “a quick return to the democratic process, and a full, inclusive process,” her spokesman Michael Mann told AFP.

She also stressed “the need to get the economy going as quickly as possible,” in a country where a quarter of the population live below the poverty line.

On Tuesday, a new 34-member cabinet was sworn in, but both the Muslim Brotherhood and the main Salafist party Al-Nur spurned offers to join it.

As a result, none of the ministers in the caretaker administration are affiliated to the Islamist movements which swept Egypt's first freely contested parliamentary elections.

The top EU diplomat also reiterated European concerns about the unrest that has rocked Egypt since Morsi's ouster on July 3, in which more than 100 people have been killed, according to an AFP tally. - Sapa-AFP

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