News / Middle East

    Kerry Tells Syria to Turn Over Chemical Weapons

    Kerry Pushes Case for Military Action Against Syriai
    X
    September 09, 2013 4:26 PM
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has offered a passionate case for military action against the Syrian government forces of President Bashar al-Assad, saying there is solid proof of his responsibility for the chemical weapons attack last month. VOA's Al Pessin reports from London, where the secretary concluded a series of meetings with European and Middle Eastern leaders.
    "Kerry Pushes Case for Military Action Against Syria" - Related video story by Al Pessin
    VOA News
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says that if President Bashar al-Assad wants to avert an attack on Syria in response to his government's alleged use of chemical weapons he should hand over his entire arsenal by the end of the week.
     
    Speaking Monday in London, the top U.S. diplomat added that he did not believe Assad would take such action and questioned whether it was even possible with a civil war raging in Syria.
     
    Still, Kerry said the Obama administration is convinced that chemical weapons in Syria are controlled by "a very tight network" with the president at its center.
     
    Kerry said global inaction in response to the incident would send the wrong signal to Assad and other U.S. adversaries in the Middle East. 
     
    "If you want to send Iran and Hezbollah and Assad a congratulatory message, 'You guys can do what you want.' You'd say, 'don't do anything,''' he said.
     
    "We believe that's dangerous and we will face this down the road in some more significant way if we're not prepared to take some kind of a stand now," Kerry said.

    Russian proposal

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov announced Monday that Moscow would push its ally Syria to place its chemical weapons under international control and then dismantle them quickly to avert U.S. strikes.
     
    Britain and Syria welcomed the Russian proposal.
     
    United Nations Chief Ban Ki-moon said that in a bid to help the U.N. Security Council overcome what he called its "embarrassing paralysis," he may ask the council to demand Syria move its chemical arms stocks to Syrian sites where they can be safely stored and destroyed.
     
    Speaking to reporters in New York, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he may also ask the 15-nation body to demand that Syria join the international anti-chemical weapons convention, a treaty that Damascus has never signed.
     
     
    Syrian President Bashar al-Assad gestures during an interview in Damascus in this in this handout photo distributed by Syria's national news agency SANA on September 2, 2013.
    Syrian President Bashar al-Assad gestures during an interview in Damascus in this in this handout photo distributed by Syria's national news agency SANA on September 2, 2013.
    Assad denial
     
    In a CBS interview taped in Damascus, Assad denied ordering the August 21 sarin gas attack outside the Syrian capital that Washington says killed more than 1,400 people.
     
    Assad warned the United States "should expect everything" in response to a potential U.S.-led military strike, saying that if "rebels or terrorists in the region" have chemical weapons, they could use them after any American intervention.
     
    "The (Syrian) government is not the only player in this region. You have different parties, different factions, different ideologies," Assad said in excerpts of the interview broadcast on the CBS "This Morning" program. 
     
    Asked to elaborate on what response the United States may face, Assad said "I am not a fortune teller who can tell you what is going to happen."
     
    Also Monday, Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem said a U.S. military strike could thwart international efforts to convene a peace conference in Geneva to negotiate a resolution to the Syrian conflict. He was speaking at a joint news conference in Moscow with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. 
     
     
     
    U.S. President Barack Obama is seen speaking at a news conference at the White House in Washington in this August 9, 2013, file photo.
    U.S. President Barack Obama is seen speaking at a news conference at the White House in Washington in this August 9, 2013, file photo.
    White House push
     
    The Obama administration is launching an intense two-day push to convince Congress and the American people of what it says is the need for a military strike on Syria.
     
    Top security advisers will hold classified and open-door briefings with lawmakers this week. President Barack Obama will give interviews to six major television networks Monday before making a White House address to the nation Tuesday night.
     
    The administration has been handing out videos to its allies, U.S. lawmakers and broadcasters, showing civilian victims of a chemical weapons attack.
     
    U.S. officials say they have evidence that proves beyond any doubt that Assad's army dropped poison gas in the Damascus suburbs last month, killing more than 1,400 people. 
     
    U.S. officials want to degrade and deter Syria's ability to use chemical weapons again. They say that doing nothing will lead to more poison gas attacks and a wider war. 
     
    Obama has promised to seek congressional approval before responding. But many in Congress have criticized his Syria plan, saying it is unfocused and could embroil the United States in another war. 
     
    United Nations inspectors who visited the sites of the August 21 Damascus attack plan to issue a report on it shortly. Kerry said President Obama has not yet decided whether to wait for the U.N. report before taking action on Syria.  
     
    U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights South African Navanethem Pillay gestures during a press conference at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva (file)
    U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights South African Navanethem Pillay gestures during a press conference at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva (file)
    UN demands
     
    In Geneva, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay told the U.N. Human Rights Council there is "little doubt" that chemical weapons have been used in Syria. She said it is one of the "gravest crimes" that can be committed. 
     
    "The international community is late, very late, to take serious joint action to halt the downward spiral that has gripped Syria, slaughtering its people and destroying its cities," Pillay said. 
     
    "This is no time for powerful states to continue to disagree on the way forward, or for geopolitical interests to override the legal and moral obligation to save lives by bringing this conflict to an end," Pillay said.  
     
    In the latest fighting on Monday, Syrian troops battled rebel forces in areas around Damascus including a Christian village and in the northern city of Aleppo.
     
    In a video statement, Islamist militants said they are withdrawing from the historic Christian town of Maaloula near the Lebanese border as government forces launched an offensive to retake control. The fighters had vowed to protect the hilltop town after rebels captured its highest peak last week. 
     
    Pro-Assad forces also continued to shell rebel-held Damascus suburbs such as Madhamiya, one of the sites of the suspected August 21 chemical attack. 
     
    Elsewhere, government airstrikes were reported on rebel positions outside Aleppo, near a strategic highway linking the city with government territory along the coast. 
     
    Rebel response
     
    Free Syrian Army rebel commander Abdullah Tlass said American involvement in Syria's two-and-a-half year civil war is the only way to stop the bloodshed.  
     
    Speaking to VOA during a visit to family members who sought refuge in Lebanon, Tlass said that if the West does not commit to fighting Assad's government, the war will continue indefinitely. He said the Free Syrian Army will keep trying to defeat the government army and drive Assad supporters out of Syria, even if it takes 100 years. 
     
    Tlass defected from the government to the rebels more than a year ago because, he said, he was told to kill innocent people. He said now he commands about 1,300 soldiers, but only 70 percent of them have weapons. 
     
    Beirut-based analyst Kamel Wazne of the Center for American Strategic Studies told VOA that the focus of anti-Assad nations on a military response in Syria is misguided. 
     
    "We see Syrian children not being taken care for because there's not enough money allocated to alleviate the pain and the suffering.... but we see all of the sudden countries - Arab countries and Western countries - wanting to put billions and billions for war.  I think that's a failure of leadership."
     
    Wazne said Free Syrian Army rebels who believe American involvement will end the war underestimate the strength of rival Islamist militants who have drawn jihadis from other parts of the region to fight the Assad government.  
     
    "I don't want to see a country next to my country in Lebanon headed by extremists, by al-Qaida, by terrorist organizations that cause a threat to me in my own country," Wazne said. 
     
    Additional reporting by Al Pessin in London, Lisa Schlein in Geneva, Edward Yeranian in Cairo, Heather Murdock in Beirut and Michael Lipin in Washington.

    • This citizen journalism image provided by Edlib News Network shows anti-Syrian regime protesters hold a poster depicting U.S. President Barack Obama during a demonstration in Kafr Nabil, Idlib province, Sept. 20, 2013.
    • Children sit along a damaged street filled with debris in the besieged area of Homs, Sept. 19, 2013.
    • Debris is seen on the ground after what activists said was shelling by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in the al-Myassar neighborhood of Aleppo, Sept. 19, 2013.
    • An injured man walks along a street after what activists said was shelling by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in the al-Myassar neighborhood of Aleppo, Sept. 19, 2013.
    • This citizen journalism image provided by The Syrian Revolution against Bashar Assad shows a Syrian military tank on fire during clashes with Free Syrian army fighters in Joubar, a suburb of Damascus, Sept. 18, 2013.
    • A member of the Shohadaa Badr Brigade, which operates under the Free Syrian Army, stands in shooting position behind sandbags in Ashrafieh, Aleppo, September 17, 2013.
    • Free Syrian Army fighters walk through rubble inside the old city of Aleppo, Sept. 16, 2013.
    • A Free Syrian Army fighter carries his weapon as he stands on rubble of damaged buildings in al-Aseela neighborhood near Aleppo's historic citadel, Sept. 13, 2013.
    • In this citizen journalism image provided by the United media office of Arbeen, a Syrian protester chants slogans during a demonstration in Arbeen, a suburb of Damascus, Sept. 13, 2013.

    You May Like

    Hope Remains for Rio Olympic Games, Despite Woes

    Facing a host of problems, Rio prepares for holding the games but experts say some risks, like Zika, may not be as grave as initially thought

    IS Use of Social Media to Recruit, Radicalize Still a Top Threat to US

    Despite military gains against IS in Iraq and Syria, their internet propaganda still commands an audience; US officials see 'the most complex challenge that the federal government and industry face'

    ‘Time Is Now’ to Save Africa’s Animals From Poachers, Activist Says

    During Zimbabwe visit, African Wildlife Foundation President Kaddu Sebunya says poaching hurts Africa as slave trade once did

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    September 09, 2013 1:45 PM
    John Kerry should apply restraint to his utterances, he may be disappointed in the long run. His president may not be as keen to carry out the threat of a strike, those he hypes it like his life depends on it. This is his last term in office and he may allow it to drift. As for Assad's threat, it's as empty as it can get. What is not lacking in it is the desire to apply more terrorist attacks - after all he has Iran and Russia to supply weapons to terrorists anyhow they want it.

    Already the Opposition group is made up of a conglomeration of terrorist groups from all over Asia and the Middle East. Expectedly terrorist groups from African may have joined them. And those now opposing the strike stress on the US, UN, NATO or EU allying with those terrorists. That’s a draw back, though. Here therefore we emphasize the need for regime change so that Syria be not left in the hands of terrorists at the end. However the UN wants to achieve this is its business

    By Navi Pillay’s contribution from the UN High Commission for Human Rights, the green light has been given for the strike. Whatever else is delaying the action is the unwillingness of those concerned to go ahead with the plan. The rebels relinquished, Maaloula, a Christian town as a gesture to the West for help, but will they continue this gesture if they are helped to take over from Assad? What about the two bishops and a priest that have been abducted and yet to be released?

    This is all the more reason a regime change should be part of the international community’s agenda until a proper arrangement is reached to ensure separation of powers and separation of religion from politics. If that is not done, the aim of the rebels might be to establish an Islamic republic that will alienate most of the citizens in favor of their religion - worse case scenario. To remove a dictator who thinks nothing in killing innocent civilians with a gas bomb is not a misguided mission.

    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    September 09, 2013 12:11 PM
    A tricky scenario is playing out here. Never has a war been hyped to this magnitude since the end of WW2. The whole scenario appears headed to a dramatic end. Mr. Obama is going to surprise everybody when he comes up to declare that he has been unable to muster enough support locally and internationally to enable him go ahead with his planned campaign in Syria. Mr. Kerry will be the most disappointed of all when it happens.

    However, another school of thought says if Obama ever goes ahead to strike Syria, it will be because he wants to use it as a bargain with al qaida and sundry terrorist groups to hand them over a place near Israel by removing Assad in return for all other places of conflict between the US and the terrorists.

    If the president chickens out of a strike, he will say it would have been because of the danger it poses to Israel and other allies in the region. But if he goes ahead with it, it is because he has seen its vintage to the terrorists in proximity to Israel. While the president has not made a boast of it, he has not done much either, to hide his dislike for Israel. So whichever way the president goes in this much orchestrated strike, the outcome is going to be disappointing. This is because, as an Iranian minster has observed, the president’s prevarication is his desire to find a way round the strike. But a strike will be more credible than a chickening out. Mr. president is going to disappoint everybody, no matter what direction he goes. Already he has shown himself not one to rely on to take pragmatic action at a time like this.

    by: CHas Holman from: USA
    September 09, 2013 11:45 AM
    I am honestly blindsided by Kerry being the one person more anxious to start war than anyone else. It's almost like he had his mind made up, and he get's angry when other solutions are pondered. He's seemingly became the very entity and person he once tried to warn you about.... times ten.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolatei
    X
    July 29, 2016 4:02 PM
    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolate

    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Tesla Opens Battery-Producing Gigafactory

    Two years after starting to produce electric cars, U.S. car maker Tesla Motors has opened the first part of its huge battery manufacturing plant, which will eventually cover more than a square kilometer. Situated close to Reno, Nevada, the so-called Gigafactory will eventually produce more lithium-ion batteries than were made worldwide in 2013. VOA's George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Polio-affected Afghan Student Fulfilling Her Dreams in America

    Afghanistan is one of only two countries in the world where children still get infected by polio. The other is Pakistan. Mahbooba Akhtarzada who is from Afghanistan, was disabled by polio, but has managed to overcome the obstacles caused by this crippling disease. VOA's Zheela Nasari caught up with Akhtarzada and brings us this report narrated by Bronwyn Benito.
    Video

    Video Hillary Clinton Promises to Build a 'Better Tomorrow'

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton urged voters Thursday not to give in to the politics of fear. She vowed to unite the country and move it forward if elected in November. Clinton formally accepted the Democratic Party's nomination at its national convention in Philadelphia. VOA national correspondent Jim Malone has more.
    Video

    Video Trump Tones Down Praise for Russia

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is toning down his compliments for Russia and Vladimir Putin as such rhetoric got him in trouble recently. After calling on Russia to find 30.000 missing emails from rival Hillary Clinton, Trump told reporters he doesn't know Putin and never called him a great leader, just one who's better than President Barack Obama. Putin has welcomed Trump's overtures, but, as Zlatica Hoke reports, ordinary Russians say they are not putting much faith in Trump.
    Video

    Video Uganda Unveils its First Solar-powered Bus

    A solar-powered bus described by its Ugandan makers as the first in Africa has made its public debut. Kiira Motors' electric bus, Kayoola, displayed recently at a stadium in Uganda's capital. From Kampala, Maurice Magorane filed this report narrated by Salem Solomon.
    Video

    Video Silicon Valley: More Than A Place, It's a Culture

    Silicon Valley is a technology powerhouse and a place that companies such as Google, Facebook and Apple call home. It is a region in northern California that stretches from San Francisco to San Jose. But, more than that, it's known for its startup culture. VOA's Elizabeth Lee went inside one company to find out what it's like to work in a startup.
    Video

    Video Immigrant Delegate Marvels at Democratic Process

    It’s been a bitter and divisive election season – but first time Indian-American delegate Dr. Shashi Gupta headed to the Democratic National Convention with a sense of hope. VOA’s Katherine Gypson followed this immigrant with the love of U.S. politics all the way to Philadelphia.
    Video

    Video Dutch Entrepreneurs Turn Rainwater Into Beer

    June has been recorded as one of the wettest months in more than a century in many parts of Europe. To a group of entrepreneurs in Amsterdam the rain came as a blessing, as they used the extra water to brew beer. Serginho Roosblad has more to the story.
    Video

    Video Commerce Thrives on US-Mexico Border

    At the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this week, the party’s presumptive presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, is expected to attack proposals made by her opponent, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Last Friday, President Barack Obama hosted his Mexican counterpart, President Enrique Peña Nieto, to underscore the good relations between the two countries. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Tucson.
    Video

    Video Film Helps Save Ethiopian Children Thought to be Cursed

    'Omo Child' looks at effort of African man to stop killings of ‘mingi’ children
    Video

    Video London’s Financial Crown at Risk as Rivals Eye Brexit Opportunities

    By most measures, London rivals New York as the only true global financial center. But Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – so-called ‘Brexit’ – means the city could lose its right to sell services tariff-free across the bloc, risking its position as Europe’s financial headquarters. Already some banks have said they may shift operations to the mainland. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora