News / Asia

Knife Attack Kills Dozens in China's Xinjiang

China says dozens are dead following an attack by a mob armed with knives in restive Xinjiang province, the latest in a series of attacks in the region.

The official Xinhua news agency says the mob staged attacks in two towns Monday, killing both Han and Uighur residents. The report says police responded with gunfire, killing dozens of attackers. An unknown number of people were wounded in the violence, which the report called a "premeditated terrorist attack."

Beijing waited nearly a day before officially confirming the violence via state media. Earlier, China's Internet minders were scrubbing social networks for references about the unrest.

Some postings said telephone and Internet communications have been cut. But calls to Shache, also known as or Yarkant County, did go through.

VOA was unable to reach officials for comment, and one local police station in Shache promptly hung up when told that a reporter was inquiring about the situation there.

Sources tell VOA the county has been locked down and that no one is being allowed to enter.

A woman at a business in Shache said she had heard about what had happened, but had no way of knowing what was true. She did not get into specifics, noting that phone lines are tapped in the region and that individuals are quickly detained for spreading rumors.

The woman added that the tense climate in the region is having a big impact on business during what is typically a brisk season. Tuesday marks the end of Ramadan, a major holiday in the region where many ethnic Muslim Uighurs live.

Xinhua posted photos Tuesday of rows of Muslims in prayer outside Id Kah Mosque, China's largest. The mosque is in Kasghar City, several hundred kilometers from where the unrest was reported to have taken place.

What the photos did not show were the scores of security officers also on hand near the mosque.

Violence linked to Xinjiang has been growing and spreading to other parts of the country. Authorities blame Uighur separatists for the attacks and have warned that religious extremists from the region are receiving training from overseas.

Critics say it is the government's heavy-handed control in the region, and religious and cultural restrictions that are fueling discontent among Xinjiang's Uighurs.

In its annual report on religious freedom released Monday, the United States raised its concerns about China's policies in the remote region.

"Broadly targeting an entire religious or ethnic community in response to the actions of a few only increases the potential for violent extremism," said Tom Malinowski, assistant secretary of the State Department's Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.

Nearly 200 people have been killed in ongoing violence in Xinjiang and other parts of the country during the past year or so. In response to the problem, the government has launched a year-long security campaign, boosting the presence of troops and police throughout the region.

Earlier this year, the government released a report on terrorism and also published a list of 10 terrorist attacks that occurred in 2013. Seven of the attacks listed occurred in Xinjiang's southern Kashgar Prefecture, including an attack on a police station in Shache late last December.

Previously, the government has been quick to publicize information about attacks, including one on a market in the capital of Urumqi that killed at least 31 people in May. Why it took nearly 24 hours this time is unclear.

In one posting that was taken down, a Weibo user by the name of Glass City asked why the government would be removing posts if such a horrible attack had occurred, and individuals could just be trying to tell others what is going on. "What is the point of such an information blockade?" the user asked.

Chinese authorities could be clamping down to help stem the spread of more unrest.

In 2009, online discussion played a key role in the outbreak of massive riots between Han Chinese and Uighurs that hit Urumqi. Authorities say about 200 people were killed in the violence, many of them Han Chinese.

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Comments
     
by: Wangchuk from: NY
August 04, 2014 11:05 AM
The CCP is waging a war against the Uighur people. Since the PLA's invasion of East Turkestan in 1949, China has treated the Uighurs as 2nd class citizens and discriminates against them for their culture & religion. If you oppress a people long enough they will eventually rise up. I oppose violence against innocent civilians but the CCP is engaged in state terrorism against the Uighurs.

by: Andy from: USA
July 30, 2014 8:42 AM
Xinjiang , like Tibet was an independent country with China. Its people have a totally different language and culture with the Chinese. In 1949, China invaded and annexed it and just like it did with Tibet in 1950. So, please don't call the Uighurs people "terrorists" . They are trying to win back their country. Free Xinjiang and Tibet now !!!
In Response

by: william li from: canada
July 30, 2014 1:02 PM
well, aboriginals have their totally different language and cultures from ameircans. should they start to kill americans and win back their lands? or may be China should round up those Uyghurs into reservations to keep them from causing troubles? uhm!

by: John Emery from: Petaluma California
July 29, 2014 4:34 PM
They do not have a gun problem in China but if people want to murder others there is always a way to do it.. Sad but true!
In Response

by: Kyle from: New York
July 30, 2014 5:11 PM
meanbill, it is Israel that defends itself against the terrorist group Hamas, that manipulates and uses the Palestinian people as pawns in its constant attacks on Israel, placing its weapons in places like schools, and using all of the cement that was sent into Gaza for humanitarian purposes to build tunnel systems for making war against Israel, a liberal democracy where Muslims have full freedom.

If Israel was a nation in which Muslims had no rights, your argument might have some merit, but as it is, it falls apart when one looks at the facts.
In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
July 29, 2014 8:21 PM
Hey John... they killed millions of people for thousands of years before they invented guns, didn't they? ... Humans kill for what's usually not theirs, and for power over others.... or resistance against (forced apartheid occupation) like Hamas fights against in Gaza..... (The Israel forced apartheid occupation, that the US supports), and wholeheartedly backs the indiscriminate destruction and killings of Palestinian homes and civilians, with all it's power and influence in the UN and the world.... CRAZY isn't it?

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