News / Europe

    Kyiv Suffers Setback in East Ukraine

    Diplomatic Solution Sought to Deepening Ukraine Crisisi
    X
    Michael Bowman
    April 16, 2014 11:51 PM
    A meeting between Russia’s foreign minister and his Ukrainian counterpart is expected later today [Thursday] at four-party talks in Geneva that will include the United States and the European Union. As VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, the diplomatic encounter comes as pro-Russian militants confront beleaguered Ukrainian forces and NATO boosts military operations along its eastern European flank.
    Related video report by VOA's Michael Bowman
    Ukrainian authorities in Kyiv suffered a serious setback Wednesday in their efforts to restore order in the troubled east of the country when pro-Russian separatists seized several Ukrainian army armored vehicles, hoisting Russia flags on them.
     
    The interception in the city of Slovyansk of a column of six armored personnel carriers, which comes on the eve of talks in Geneva between diplomats from Russia, Ukraine and the West, is adding to frustrations here in Kyiv about the failure of the country's new leaders to re-assert control in the east.
     
    Kyiv authorities deny claims by locals that Ukrainian paratroopers manning the half dozen troop carriers switched sides after agitators offered them food. Separatists say the soldiers' morale was low and that they hadn't been given supplies for several days.
     
    Ukrainian defense officials say the column was captured with the help of Russian agents. Kyiv insists that hundreds of Russian troops have crossed the border and are coaching and instructing separatists on tactics.

    Witnesses say a second armored Ukrainian column moving toward Slovyansk was stopped by a crowd blocking the roadway.  Western journalists say the Ukrainian occupants were only allowed to retreat after disabling their firearms.

    Counter-intelligence chief Vitaly Nayda told a news conference Wednesday that the determination was made after intercepting conversations of the Russian military from Slovyansk.

    He said 40 agents 'recruited by Russian security services' had been arrested.  Nayada added that those arrested had admitted to being recruited and were now assisting with the investigation.

    Moscow dismissed the allegation.

    White House spokesman Jay Carney said Wednesday that Kyiv had responded with "admirable restraint" to the separatists actions, saying it was appropriate for the government to act to restore law and order.

    The U.S. is considering a request from Ukraine's government for what a U.S. official calls non-lethal assistance.
     
    Ukraine's new leaders, who replaced President Viktor Yanukovych ousted in February after months of street protests against his pro-Russian rule, are trying to dampen ethnic Russian agitation in east Ukraine by offering reforms and greater autonomy for the region.
     
    They are also trying to measure their response to the seizing in the last few days by pro-Russian militants of government and security buildings in at least 10 towns in eastern Ukraine.
     
    They fear that too strong an action will offer the Kremlin a pretext to order in an estimated 40,000-strong Russian army massed on the border in a posture that U.S. and NATO officials say is highly aggressive.
     
    Kyiv's politicians claim Moscow has been infiltrating Russian provocateurs for weeks to incite much of the agitation in east Ukraine - an allegation also leveled by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry. 

    The Kremlin denies this and has warned it is ready to send forces massed on the border to protect ethnic Russians - the initial reason given for seizing the Ukrainian peninsula of Crimea.
     
    Pro-Russian activists deny the claims, often flashing Ukrainian passports to reporters.
     
    According to the Kremlin, Russian President Vladimir Putin told German Chancellor Angela Merkel in telephone talks Wednesday that Ukraine is on the verge of civil war.
     
    Amid escalating rhetoric between Moscow and Kyiv, a top British Conservative politician, John Whittingdale, told VOA he was pessimistic about the outcome of the scheduled four-way talks on Thursday in Geneva between senior diplomats from Russia, the European Union, the United States and Ukraine.

    A top U.S. official also downplayed expectations for a breakthrough.

    "We don't have high expectations for these talks, but we do believe it is very important to keep that diplomatic door open," said Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland during a congressional hearing last week.

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov tried to control Moscow’s agenda in a phone conversation with Kerry last week, saying the talks must focus on fostering dialogue among Ukrainians and not on bilateral relations among the participants, according to a statement from Russian foreign ministry. 
     
    United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has expressed his alarm over the "highly volatile situation" and has told the Russian leader that all parties need to "work to de-escalate the situation", his spokesman said.
     
    Russia has accused the new Ukrainian government of provoking the crisis in eastern Ukraine by threatening the country's Russian-speaking minority and says far-ultranationalist Ukrainians are at the root of the problem.

    But U.N. officials in a report issued Tuesday dubbed as "greatly exaggerated" allegations of harassment of ethnic Russians by Ukrainian nationalists.
     
    As well as suffering the loss of the armored column Wednesday, Ukrainian authorities also failed to prevent the seizing by pro-Russian separatists of a third major government building in the city of Donetsk – this time the office of the city's mayor.
     
    The only success Kyiv authorities have had on the ground in the east is regaining control earlier this week of a small airfield in the town of Kramatorsk.

    But even there on Wednesday, a crowd of pro-Russian local citizens stopped several Ukrainian military vehicles on the outskirts of the town of Kramatorsk, blocking their way. They forced the soldiers to hand over parts of their weapons, rendering them unusable, before allowing the troops to continue on their way.

    NATO to boost presence

    Earlier, NATO announced it was boosting its presence near member states along the Russian border.

    "We will have more planes in the air, more ships on the water, and more readiness on the land," Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen told a news conference. He added that the measures aim to immediately reinforce its military footprint in eastern Europe, in response to Russia's moves.

    Constant Brant, a NATO public affairs officer in Brussels, said details of the deployment were still being worked out and that Allied Commander Philip Breedlove was expected to make an announcement regarding the make-up of the force in the coming days.

    The United States and the European Union have both warned of imposing additional sanctions on top of punitive economic measures taken following Russia’s annexation of Crimea last month.

    VOA's Catherine Maddux contributed to this report from Washington, some information provided by Reuters
    • A column of combat vehicles with a Russian flag on the front one makes its way to the town of Kramatorsk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • A combat vehicle with gunmen on top makes its way through a checkpoint to the town of Slovyansk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • A masked gunman guards combat vehicles with Russian, Donetsk Republic and Ukrainian paratroopers, flags and gunmen on top, Slovyansk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • Local residents bring flowers to place them on armored personnel carriers in Slovyansk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • Masked pro-Russian gunmen attack a photojournalist near combat vehicles flying a Russian flag, in Slovyansk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • An Orthodox icon is displayed on barricades in front of a city parliament in Slovyansk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • A woman cleans up trash in front of an entrance to a city administration building in Slovyansk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • Ukrainian servicemen look at a Ukrainian military jet fly above them while they sit on top of armored personnel carriers in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.
    • A Ukrainian Army helicopter flies over a column of Ukrainian Army combat vehicles on the way to the town of Kramatorsk, Ukraine, April 16, 2014.

    You May Like

    Video For Many US Veterans, the Vietnam War Continues

    More than 40 years after it ended, war in Vietnam and America’s role in it continue to provoke bitter debate, especially among those who fought in it

    Video Newest US Citizens, Writing the Next Great Chapter

    100 immigrants graduated Friday as US citizens in New York, joining the ranks of 680,000 others every year in cities across country

    Family's Fight Pays Off With Arlington Cemetery Burial Rights for WASPs

    Policy that allowed the Women Airforce Service Pilots veterans to receive burial rites at Arlington had been revoked in 2015

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Mark J. Carter from: Texas, USA
    April 17, 2014 12:39 AM
    Its not the politicians who need to be talking. Its Westinghouse and Rosatom, Gazprom and the Western Gas and Oil Companies, the European Central Bank and The Bank of Russia; because that's what this conflict is really all about.

    Who is going to supply the Ukraine reactors with nuclear fuel, who will be supplying Europe with Gas and Oil, and which bank will receive the tributes from the usury that will finance it all.

    It is the corporations driving the policy of the West AND Russia.

    The all or nothing attitude of market domination needs to STOP; or they may all end up with something much worse than simply being locked out of a market.

    What the world needs is some truth; its time for the media to give us some.

    by: Anonymous
    April 17, 2014 12:08 AM
    Russia have no plan to war with Ukraine. And that is real true

    by: Igor from: Russia
    April 16, 2014 11:30 PM
    "Never use military force against its own people" is the first lesson those in power in Kiev should have learned. They should have not labelled civilians as terrorists. In fact the illegal government itself in Kiev is terrorize civilians.

    by: Dr. Q.R. Longweiner from: USA
    April 16, 2014 10:34 PM
    The fact that the current crisis in Ukraine was instigated by a US-backed coup which toppled a democratically elected government has been conveniently forgotten. Forgetting that, VOA???

    by: Anonymous
    April 16, 2014 5:56 PM
    Shouldn't "Putin" be denouncing the acts of Russian civilians in Ukraine warning the Russians that he will not take part in chopping up Ukraine or taking any control in Ukraine? This would dissolve the actions of the Russian people in Ukraine (which very possibly were sent to Ukraine to cause unrest)... Liability is in the hands of Putin.

    If Putin doesn't choose to do so, then the world should slap more serious sanctions on Putin/Russia until the civilians of Russia choose someone to run their country that does not do what Putin does. Putin should be ousted in Russia or overthrown for his actions over the past many years. Possibly even investigated for some of the crimes that were committed as well.

    by: Anonymous
    April 16, 2014 5:12 PM
    Majority of Syrian civilians murdered in Syria by bashar al assad have been killed by Russian weapons. Putin is responsible for that ongoing turmoil as well. Putin needs his hand slapped by the international community. Alternate methods of gas and power need to be considered so the world can cut lose Putins gas supply.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Vietnamese-American Youth Optimistic About Obama's Visit to Vietnami
    X
    Elizabeth Lee
    May 22, 2016 6:04 AM
    U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to Vietnam later this month comes at a time when Vietnam is seeking stronger ties with the United States. Many Vietnamese Americans, especially the younger generation, are optimistic Obama’s trip will help further reconciliation between the two former foes. Elizabeth Lee has more from the community called "Little Saigon" located south of Los Angeles.
    Video

    Video Vietnamese-American Youth Optimistic About Obama's Visit to Vietnam

    U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to Vietnam later this month comes at a time when Vietnam is seeking stronger ties with the United States. Many Vietnamese Americans, especially the younger generation, are optimistic Obama’s trip will help further reconciliation between the two former foes. Elizabeth Lee has more from the community called "Little Saigon" located south of Los Angeles.
    Video

    Video First-generation, Afghan-American Student Sets Sights on Basketball Glory

    Their parents are immigrants to the United States. They are kids who live between two worlds -- their parents' homeland and the U.S. For many of them, they feel most "American" at school. It can be tricky balancing both worlds. In this report, produced by Beth Mendelson, Arash Arabasadi tells us about one Afghan-American student who seems to be coping -- one shot at a time.
    Video

    Video Newest US Citizens, Writing the Next Great Chapter

    While universities across the United States honor their newest graduates this Friday, many immigrants in downtown Manhattan are celebrating, too. One hundred of them, representing 31 countries across four continents, graduated as U.S. citizens, joining the ranks of 680,000 others every year in New York and cities around the country.
    Video

    Video Vietnam Sees Strong Economic Growth Despite Incomplete Reforms

    Vietnam has transformed its communist economy to become one of the world's fastest-growing nations. While the reforms are incomplete, multinational corporations see a profitable future in Vietnam and have made major investments -- as VOA's Jim Randle reports.
    Video

    Video Qatar Denies World Cup Corruption

    The head of Qatar’s organizing committee for the 2022 World Cup insists his country's bid to host the soccer tournament was completely clean, despite the corruption scandals that have rocked the sport’s governing body, FIFA. Hassan Al-Thawadi also said new laws would offer protection to migrants working on World Cup construction projects. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
    Video

    Video Infrastructure Funding Puts Cambodia on Front Line of International Politics

    When leaders of the world’s seven most developed economies meet in Japan next week, demands for infrastructure investment world wide will be high on the agenda. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s push for “quality infrastructure investment” throughout Asia has been widely viewed as a counter to the rise of Chinese investment flooding into region.
    Video

    Video Democrats Fear Party Unity a Casualty in Clinton-Sanders Battle

    Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton claimed a narrow victory in Tuesday's Kentucky primary even as rival Bernie Sanders won in Oregon. Tensions between the two campaigns are rising, prompting fears that the party will have a difficult time unifying to face the presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump. VOA national correspondent Jim Malone has more from Washington.
    Video

    Video Portrait of a Transgender Marriage: Husband and Wife Navigate New Roles

    As controversy continues in North Carolina over the use of public bathrooms by transgender individuals, personal struggles with gender identity that were once secret are now coming to light. VOA’s Tina Trinh explored the ramifications for one couple as part of trans.formation, a series of stories on transgender issues.
    Video

    Video Amerikan Hero Flips Stereotype of Middle Eastern Character

    An Iranian American comedian is hoping to connect with American audiences through a film that inverts some of Hollywood's stereotypes about Middle Eastern characters. Sama Dizayee reports.
    Video

    Video Budding Young Inventors Tackle City's Problems with 3-D Printing

    Every city has problems, and local officials and politicians are often frustrated by their inability to solve them. But surprising solutions can come from unexpected places. Students in Baltimore. Maryland, took up the challenge to solve problems they identified in their city, and came up with projects and products to make a difference. VOA's June Soh has more on a digital fabrication competition primarily focused on 3-D design and printing. Carol Pearson narrates.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora