News / USA

Oprah: Lance Armstrong Has 'Come Clean' About Doping

Lance Armstrong's reported admission to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs likely means he will go down in history as the most brazen drug cheat the sport has ever seen.
Lance Armstrong's reported admission to Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs likely means he will go down in history as the most brazen drug cheat the sport has ever seen.
VOA News
Talk show host Oprah Winfrey is confirming former world cycling champion Lance Armstrong has "come clean" about his use of performance enhancing drugs to help win the Tour de France.
 
Winfrey told CBS News Tuesday that she and Armstrong had agreed not to discuss the interview before it aired on her OWN network later this week.  But she says she decided to come out and talk about the interview because the confession had "already been confirmed" by news sources.
 
Armstrong made the confession during an emotional interview Monday. Winfrey said Armstrong did not come clean in the manner that she expected, but that she "was satisfied by the answers.
 
The 41-year-old cancer survivor had long denied using performance-enhancing drugs, despite years of persistent rumors.
In August, Armstrong was stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles after the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said it had proof he was centrally involved in a complex illegal doping program.

A number of other cyclists and former teammates testified against Armstrong during the probe.

Acting on the U.S. agency's recommendation, the International Cycling Union then stripped Armstrong of his Tour de France titles and banned him from any competition for life.

Earlier Monday, Armstrong apologized in person to the staff of his cancer charity for the scandal. Witnesses say Armstrong fought back tears as he gave what they call a sincere and heartfelt apology to his former colleagues.

Armstrong founded the Livestrong Foundation, based in Austin, Texas, but recently cut all ties to the group in an effort to prevent further negative publicity about its anti-cancer effort.

  • July 25, 1999: Lance Armstrong wins his first Tour de France, pictured riding down the Champs Elysees with teammates in Paris.
  • August 1999: Bicyclists roll down Congress Ave. in Austin, Texas, where Armstrong currently lives, during a parade held in his honor.
  • July 23, 2000: Armstrong wins his second Tour de France, the second American to repeat as champion since Greg LeMond won in 1989 and 1990.
  • July 29, 2001: Lance Armstrong  (right) on the podium next to second-placed Jan Ullrich of Germany, after winning the Tour de France for the third time.
  • July 6, 2002: Armstrong undergoes medical examinations ahead of the 2002 Tour de France race in Luxembourg.
  • July 26, 2002: Armstrong at the start of the 18th stage of the Tour de France. Teammate Floyd Landis is second right.
  • July 28, 2002: Armstrong wins his fourth consecutive Tour de France.
  • July 27, 2003: Lance Armstrong with his wife Kristin, his son Luke and his twin daughters Isabelle Rose and Grace Elizabeth, signaling five (for the number of Tours de France he has won).
  • July 25, 2004: Armstrong becomes the first person to win six Tour de France titles.
  • July 25, 2004: Armstrong greets fans after the race on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris.
  • July 24, 2005: Lance Armstrong wins his seventh straight Tour de France race.
  • August 23, 2005: The French sports daily l'Equipe reports Lance Armstrong used the performance-enhancing drug EPO to win his first Tour de France title in 1999, a claim he immediately denied.
  • August 25, 2005: Armstrong appears on CNN's "Larry King Live" with Bob Costas to discuss recent allegations of doping.
  • November 5, 2006: Lance Armstrong (picured in green) runs the New York City Marathon, his first.
  • September 2008: Armstrong announces he is ending a three-year cycling retirement and aims for an eighth Tour de France victory.
  • January 20, 2009: Armstrong races in the Tour Down Under in Adelaide, his first since resuming his professional cycling career.
  • July 25, 2009: Andy Schleck of Luxembourg, Alberto Contador of Spain, and Lance Armstrong, left to right, cross the finish line during the 20th stage of the Tour de France.
  • July 10, 2010: Lance Armstrong rides in the pack during his final Tour de France.
  • June 28, 2012: Levi Leipheimer, George Hincapie, Christian Vande Velde and David Zabriskie struck a deal with the US anti doping agency to admit to using doping and to give evidence against Armstrong.
  • October 17, 2012: Lance Armstrong announces he is stepping down as chairman of his Livestrong cancer-fighting charity so the group can focus on its mission instead of its founder's problems.
  • The move came a week after the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency released a massive report detailing allegations of widespread doping by Armstrong and his teams when he won the Tour de France seven times from 1999 to 2005.
  • Lance Armstrong stands onstage during the 15th anniversary celebration for the Livestrong charity, October 19, 2012, in Austin, Texas. Armstrong said he has been through a "difficult couple of weeks" and urged supporters of the charity to stand behind its mission.
​The 41-year-old American athlete is also the subject of a lawsuit accusing him of defrauding the U.S. government during the years his team was sponsored by the U.S. Postal Service.  The lawsuit was filed by former teammate Floyd Landis, who was stripped of his 2006 Tour de France victory after he was caught doping. Sources say Armstrong is in talks with the USPS to repay some of the money.

Armstrong could face prison time if the government were to file perjury charges against him for testimony he gave under oath to a federal grand jury in 2005.

He also is facing a lawsuit by the London-based Sunday Times to recover about $500,000 it paid to settle a libel lawsuit filed by Armstrong against the newspaper.

And the disgraced cyclist is facing demands that he return millions of dollars in awards and fees.

A U.S.-based promotions company is seeking repayment of a $7.5 million bonus awarded to Armstrong for one of his seven Tour de France victories.  And Jay Weatherill, the premier of Australia's South Australia state, told reporters Tuesday his government would be "more than happy" for Armstrong to repay money he received to participate in the Tour Down Under race for three consecutive years, beginning in 2009.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Courtenay from: UK
January 15, 2013 5:16 PM
Going off what a few people on this post have written , lets do away with rules in sport , infact lets do away with laws in general! do what you want to do even if you know its wrong and it may hurt others ... maybe even kill somebody(we all know cyclist die because of doping all the time) He is a cheat and collected money fraudlently . BAN HIM FROM ALL COMPETITIVE SPORT AND MAKE HIM PAY BACK HIS PRIZE MONEY AND INDORSEMENTS. BUT MOST OF ALL HE SHOULD APPOLIGISE TO THE GUYS HE CHEATED AGAINST, NOT TO OPRAH!

by: huskerfan4life from: Nebraska
January 15, 2013 8:18 AM
Has any one person ever raised more money for cancer research than Lance Armstrong? He cheated, lied and helped thousands of people along the way. The same thing happens every day in business and politics and those guys are some of the most respected people in our communities but everyone is upset with a guy that rode his bike better than the rest of the guys who were cheating too.
Life short he is the one who will answer to a much higher level because of what it has done to him personally. I think everyone is making so much out of this. He did so much good but no one is talking about that just the negative! Hang Strong Lance!
In Response

by: huskerfan4life from: Nebraska
January 15, 2013 9:39 AM
Well then why not have him spend the next 15 years volunteering and he is still riding because it is what he does.. let him do it and regulate that a larger percentage goes to those charities. He still brought more attention and awareness to the research. Everyone is always looking for Negative in everyone. I'm just saying people should work harder at turning that Negative into something positive! I am not a fan of Doping. Have never smoked let alone done drugs of any kind. No one is perfect we all make mistakes, is all I am saying.

There is so much pressure on our athletes to perform the best. I think the sponsors should be held just as responsible do you really think some of them really didn't know? They showed a blind eye to it and made millions by having his name on their products. Money hungry and Greed is what drives them all and they dangle in front of all our athletes, actors, models, singers etc., anyone who is anyone will sell or promote their products.
In Response

by: Davidson
January 15, 2013 8:46 AM
Hi Husker, check the financial statements from Livestrong.org, the organization took in hundreds of millions of dollars and gave only a tiny fraction of it in grants and cancer care. They spent more on postage than they did on cancer research. The board members had huge expense accounts and compensation packages that used up the majority of the money, the rest was spent on overhead. Your hero the cancer survivor didn't care that much about helping others survive cancers.

by: steve from: wa
January 15, 2013 7:56 AM
JAIL ,JAIL ,JAIL

20 Years should do it plus make him bankrupt and take everything off him.need to set the standard in society , that this is not acceptable .Fraud at its best .Sheryl Crow knew when to jump ship

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