News / Africa

Law Expert: Better Protection Needed Following Kenya Church Attacks

A member of the Kenyan security forces speaks on a telephone next to the body of one of those killed, outside the African Inland Church in Garissa, Kenya, July 1, 2012. A member of the Kenyan security forces speaks on a telephone next to the body of one of those killed, outside the African Inland Church in Garissa, Kenya, July 1, 2012.
x
A member of the Kenyan security forces speaks on a telephone next to the body of one of those killed, outside the African Inland Church in Garissa, Kenya, July 1, 2012.
A member of the Kenyan security forces speaks on a telephone next to the body of one of those killed, outside the African Inland Church in Garissa, Kenya, July 1, 2012.
Peter Clottey
The vice president of the East Africa Law Society has called on Kenya’s government to be more proactive in gathering intelligence to protect its citizens following two church attacks Sunday.

Gunmen attacked two churches in Garissa, a northeastern Kenyan city, that left at least 17 people dead and more than 40 wounded.  Two police are among those killed.  

James Mwamu said the government appears to be ill-prepared to protect Kenyans.

“We are concerned about the security situation in Kenya… [and] we wish to condemn those attacks in the strongest terms possible, and the reason is that we cannot allow terrorists to be running around killing men women and children, innocent civilians, who have nothing to do with the war that is happening in Somalia,” said Mwamu. “I think, now more than ever, the Kenyan government needs to take the threats of al-Shabab more seriously than ever because we do not know where they are going to strike out next.”

He said Kenyans are apprehensive following recent attacks often blamed on the hardline Somali insurgent group, al-Shabab.  Mwamu said the country should deal “harshly” with terrorism.

Regional police Chief Philip Ndolo said four gunmen masked in balaclavas attacked the African Inland Church in Garissa.  He said they entered the church after throwing two grenades inside.  Two grenades also exploded in a nearby Roman Catholic Church.

Mwamu said Kenyans are dissatisfied with what he said is the government’s poor response to terrorism.  Last month, the U.S. Embassy in Kenya warned of the threat of an imminent attack in Mombasa, a top tourist destination, after police arrested two Iranians on suspicion of planning bomb attacks.

Mwamu said the government’s reaction towards the warning was lackadaisical.

"They said the American embassy seems to be undermining the work of the government, two days later there was a terrorist attack.  It means the Kenyan government is not taking seriously this information of threats,” Mwamu said.

“What they should have done was to cooperate with the US government where they had this kind of information," he added. "Our government should be more proactive in the gathering of intelligence.  We think that they should be proactive in dealing with the issues of terrorism.”

Mwamu said citizens are ready to help the government in its effort to combat terrorism.  He also said the administration should resign and call for new elections if it’s incapable of protecting the people.

“Any government that fails to protect its people has no responsibility staying in power.  If they are not able to protect the people, they should say that they are not able to do it.  Let’s call for elections and you put in a new government in place that is prepared to protect the people of Kenya,” he said.

Clottey interview with James Mwamu, VP of the East Africa Law Society
Clottey interview with James Mwamu, VP of the East Africa Law Society i
|| 0:00:00
...
 
🔇
X

You May Like

In China, Mixed Signals on Ebola Controls

How authorities are monitoring at-risk individuals remains unclear, including whether there are quarantines for Chinese health workers returning from West Africa More

Video Women Voters Anxious Ahead of US Elections

Analysts say if women are focused on national security, it could be bad news for Democrats More

Solar's Future Looks Brighter

New technology and dropping prices are contributing to a surge in solar power More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Paul Gesimba from: Nairobi
July 02, 2012 2:36 AM
The Government of Kenya should push more troops to the porous border with Somalia to form a human shield .To protect innocent civilians women and children who have nothing to do with the War afte all the code name for the War is operation Linda nchi or protect the Country .Our fiends in NATO should lend us a hand in combating the Al -Shaabab a terror network allied to the Al- Qeada .The USA Government should send a Naval fleet or one aircraft to the region .If the Allied forces could assist the Libyans against Col Ghadaffi .They should also assist the AMISOM forces deal with the terror networks .


by: A_McBeth from: USA
July 01, 2012 11:38 PM
Governments are always incompetent. The only real option is for the people to be able to protect themselves.


by: M. from: california
July 01, 2012 10:21 PM
The premise of this article is a joke. Islam has been ravaging for decades... what a joke.


by: T.J. Fod from: New Yawk
July 01, 2012 10:00 PM
VOA is now consulting a 'legal expert' on what to do about Islamist fascist attacking worshippers in a catholic church?

Wrong response. There are simply two responses to this outrage:

a. leaders of the west must do what Obama won't do and call this what it is; a war crime committed by islamist fascists in a jihad (that's moslem for war) against Christian worshippers.

b. The UN must arm and hire a multinational brigade that will hunt down and kill ANYONE who is proposing this as a strategy. That's right hunt down and kill ANYONE who supports this. Pre-empt and let them know everything is being thrown at them.

This is the only historical way the West has stopped the islamist fasciasts moslem hordes. The west had one offensive Crusade against Islam and 5 defensive crusades against islamist fascists.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Women Voters Anxious Ahead of US Electionsi
X
October 31, 2014 4:10 AM
Public opinion polls show American voters are deeply dissatisfied with their government and anxious about threats from abroad. This is especially true for a key voting group both Republicans and Democrats are trying hard to win over: women. Analysts say if women are focused on national security, it could be bad news for Democrats, with majority control of the Senate at stake. VOA’s Cindy Saine looks at the crucial role women voters will play in deciding the elections.
Video

Video Women Voters Anxious Ahead of US Elections

Public opinion polls show American voters are deeply dissatisfied with their government and anxious about threats from abroad. This is especially true for a key voting group both Republicans and Democrats are trying hard to win over: women. Analysts say if women are focused on national security, it could be bad news for Democrats, with majority control of the Senate at stake. VOA’s Cindy Saine looks at the crucial role women voters will play in deciding the elections.
Video

Video Victorious Secularists Face Challenge to Form Government in Tunisia

Official results from Tunisia show the Islamist Ennahda party has failed to win the second free election since the so-called "Arab Spring" uprising in 2011. Ennahda, which handed power to a government of technocrats pending the elections, lost out to the secular party Nidaa Tounes. Henry Ridgwell reports from London that the relatively peaceful poll offers some hope in a volatile region.
Video

Video Africa Tells its Story Through Fashion

In Africa, Fashion Week is a riot of colors, shapes, patterns and fabrics - against the backdrop of its ongoing struggle between nature and its fast-growing urban edge. How do these ideas translate into needle and thread? VOA’s Anita Powell visited this year’s Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Africa in Johannesburg to find out.
Video

Video Smugglers Offer Cheap Passage From Turkey to Syria

Smugglers in Turkey offer a relatively cheap passage across the border into Syria. Ankara has stepped up efforts to stem the flow of foreign fighters who want to join Islamic State militants fighting for control of the Syrian border city of Kobani. But porous borders and border guards who can be bribed make illegal border crossings quite easy. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.

All About America

AppleAndroid