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Lawyers for 9/11 Suspects Ask Obama to Declassify Details of CIA Interrogation

Lawyers for five September 11 terror suspects imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay have asked U.S. President Barack Obama to declassify details of the CIA's secret interrogation program.

In a letter to the president, the lawyers accuse the United States of suppressing evidence. They say the "self-serving" restrictions on the CIA program keep them from putting together a proper defense.

They also accuse the United States of possible war crimes. The White House has not yet responded.

Under the Rendition, Detention, and Interrogation program, the CIA flew the terror suspects to
secret foreign prisons, where they underwent such extraordinary questioning techniques as sleep deprivation and simulated drowning called "waterboarding."

The lawyers and human rights activists call these techniques torture.

The five suspects are charged with plotting the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, killing 3,000 people.

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