News / Africa

    Malawians Cast Votes, Triggering Unrest

    A woman receives a mark on her finger with indelible ink prior to vote for Malawi's Tripartite elections at Malemia School Polling center, the home village of the incumbent president, May 20, 2014.
    A woman receives a mark on her finger with indelible ink prior to vote for Malawi's Tripartite elections at Malemia School Polling center, the home village of the incumbent president, May 20, 2014.
    Lameck Masina
    Unrest has marred elections in Malawi on Tuesday, where incumbent leader Joyce Banda is facing stiff challenges from 11 candidates in the first democratic test of her rule.

    Soldiers were deployed in the commercial capital, Blantyre, on Tuesday after angry voters set fires at some polling stations and blocked roads. Protesters alleged fraud, after some polling stations opened late. Some protesters also complained that names had been left off election ballots.

    Police eventually contained the situation.

    Incumbent is front-runner

    In the absence of reliable opinion polls, most analysts rank Banda, leader of the People's Party, as the favored candidate because of her popularity in rural areas where she has been rolling out development projects and farm subsidies.

    After casting her ballot in the southern village of Malemia, Banda urged all sides to keep calm.

    “I'm thankful that the campaign period was peaceful and am urging all Malawians to vote peacefully today without any incident or loss of life,” she told reporters.

    She rose to power two years ago when her predecessor, Bingu wa Mutharika, suddenly died in office. At the time, she was serving as vice president.

    Her main challengers include Mutharika's brother, Peter, former cleric Lazarus Chakwera, and Atupele Muluzi, who is the son of former Malawian president Bakili Muluzi. All three of their parties have previously won the presidency.

    Large turnout

    Despite the anomalies, there has been a huge turnout, especially in rural areas.

    Before the voting got underway, election commission chairman Justice Maxon Mbendera told VOA the polling would be credible and transparent, despite concerns about a new voters' list.

    "They should have confidence that we are doing all we can to bring about an election that is credible, that is free and fair. And my plea to them is to come out in their large numbers to select and choose the leaders of their choice," said Mbendera. "This is an election, a mother of all elections in Malawi."

    According to Gilbert Museliwa, who voted at the Goliati polling center in the southern district of Thyolo, expectations are high regardless of which candidate wins.

    “I am very excited to have cast the ballot for the leaders I want to lead me. I have also voted for a ward council who has a clear vision of development," said Museliwa. "My expectation is that the new president should be able to do what people want and that is the person I have voted for and that is my expectations of the new leader.”

    Another voter, Gertrude Lungu, said the voting was peaceful, but complained about the slow voting process.

    “The slowness is generally because of lack of materials, because of the eight streams that they were supposed to have at this center only two are operating, meaning that only two people are voting at a time against the expected eight people,” she said.

    A presiding officer at the center, Charles Tembo, said the problem has been communicated to the Thyolo District commissioner, who assured them it would be sorted out as soon as possible.

    Malawi Electoral Commission officials told VOA that they are hoping to quickly rectify all the polling station problems.  

    By law, election results are to be released within seven days after voting.

    'Cashgate' weighs

    Banda initially enjoyed goodwill from the many who resented Mutharika's autocratic style, allowing her to win the backing of foreign donors, along with the International Monetary Fund, when she pushed through austerity measures, including a sharp devaluation of the kwacha designed to stabilize the farming-dependent economy.

    Urban voters, however, have criticized Banda's response as ponderous. Her relations with some donors have soured.

    More recently, however, her administration's reputation has been hit by a $15 million graft scandal; dubbed "Cashgate," if followed the discovery of large amounts of money in the car of a senior government official.

    More than 80 people have been arrested and a former cabinet minister has been dismissed and put on trial for money laundering and attempted murder.

    Tuesday's ballot also includes elections for parliamentarians and local government officials.

    Some information for this report comes from Reuters.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: tiö from: south africa
    May 22, 2014 8:17 AM
    why cant people just accept defeat rather than try 2 prove something that is not true

    by: tripple malawi from: lilongwe
    May 20, 2014 10:32 PM
    I wound love DR Chakwera to win for good politics

    by: Tarsitius Chilekwa from: lusaka
    May 20, 2014 4:37 PM
    I would love joyce to win and finish her programmes. Government must not be changeed like undrrwears

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