News / Asia

Malaysia Clears Passengers in Probe of Missing Jet

Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman (R) speaks to the media after a closed door meeting with relatives of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 at a hotel in Bangi, Malaysia, April 2, 2014.
Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman (R) speaks to the media after a closed door meeting with relatives of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 at a hotel in Bangi, Malaysia, April 2, 2014.
VOA News
Malaysia's national police chief says all 227 passengers aboard the jet airliner that disappeared last month have been cleared of wrongdoing, but authorities are continuing to investigate the two pilots and other crew members.

Inspector General Khalid Abu Bakar said Wednesday investigators need more time to try to determine why Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 vanished 25 days ago on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

The police chief said the investigation "may go on and on and on," and it is possible that there may never be any complete answers to the mystery of the Boeing 777 jet that vanished.

An international search for debris in the southern Indian Ocean and a criminal investigation by Malaysian police have so far proven fruitless.

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says Southeast Asian defense ministers meeting in Hawaii later this week will certainly discuss the incident. Without criticizing Malaysia's handling of the search for the plane, he said there are "always lessons to be learned" from such a crisis.

The police inspector general in Kuala Lumpur said the possibilities police are considering include hijacking, sabotage and personal or psychological problems afflicting those on board.

Khalid said investigators have conducted 170 interviews and that more statements need to be collected.

Malaysian officials have said they believe someone intentionally diverted the plane, and that oit ultimately crashed into remote and treacherous waters off the northwest coast of Australia.

Ten aircraft and nine ships continued to search for any wreckage Wednesday, under favorable weather conditions.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said his country is committed to finding out what happened to the plane.

"It's one of the great mysteries of our time. It's a terrible tragedy," he said. "There are 239 devastated families. There are a lot of very concerned people right around the world, and Australia is leading the search and recovery effort - as is right, given that it all happened in our search-and-rescue zone. We owe it to the world. We owe it to those families to do whatever we reasonably can to get to the bottom of this."

The search is also expanding underwater, with the arrival of Britain's nuclear-powered submarine HMS Tireless.

Time is running out to detect the signal from the missing plane's flight data recorders, whose battery power usually lasts only 30 days.

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by: mike from: spokane
April 02, 2014 9:23 PM
What the possibitity of hijacking the plane for the people and their body parts. Alot of money in that part of the world.


by: Seymour Levine from: Culver City CA USA
April 02, 2014 11:13 AM
We Can Proactively Prevent Crashes Like MH370 & Enhance Air Safety and Economy of Flight

At the end of World War 2 a number of Air Force veterans got jobs at the FAA. The Air Force had been using military radar for tracking aircraft. They came in and pushed the FAA to enhance their system which was visual at that time. They added Radar like the military. So that the present Air Traffic Control (ATC) and management system came out of the military technology. The airlines, aircraft manufacturer, pilots don’t pay for the ATC system or GPS. The ATC system uses radar to record aircraft position and radio to record conversations with the pilots and controllers (the recordings are not considered private). The tradition ATC infrastructure, has already been accomplished with technology that came out of the military. The airlines don't pay for the tracking radars or the cost of GPS. It is a hole in the present aviation system that the airlines, aircraft manufacturer and pilots, out of fear of liability, have put a “private” around the Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) information being recorded in the aircraft have prevented that critical safety data from being used in real-time.

In this modern day of lots of International Travel and global economy the digital flight data recorder data should be telemetered to the ground in real-time and used to track the aircraft and prevent crashes. It can be done every second. The memory requirement for all aircraft flying on a single day presently fit on the memory of a single lap-top computer. Converting to real-time digital flight data recording can save billions of dollars and make flying safer and nations more secure (preventing 9/11 alone would have more than paid for the system). We owe it to all that have died in fatal crashes that could have been prevented to fix the system and break down the political barrier walls that have allowed for a host of fatal crashes that were preventable (eg : decompression, rogue piloting, etc.).

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