News / Africa

    Mali's President Appoints New Prime Minister

    Mali's interim President Dioncounda Traore (C) in the capital Bamako, July 27, 2012.Mali's interim President Dioncounda Traore (C) in the capital Bamako, July 27, 2012.
    x
    Mali's interim President Dioncounda Traore (C) in the capital Bamako, July 27, 2012.
    Mali's interim President Dioncounda Traore (C) in the capital Bamako, July 27, 2012.
    Anne Look
    Mali's interim president has appointed a new prime minister.  The move comes less than 24 hours after the former interim prime minister resigned following his arrest by soldiers loyal to the military junta that overthrew the elected government in March.  
     
    Mali's interim president, Dioncounda Traore, said Tuesday night on state television that he had accepted the resignation of now former prime minister Cheikh Modibo Diarra, but made no direct mention of his arrest. 
     
    Traore said he had received the formal resignation in writing and accepted it.  He thanked Diarra for his service and said Mali would know its new prime minister within 24 hours and have a new government by the end of the week. 

    Cheikh Modibo Diarra

    • An astrophysicist who worked for NASA and Microsoft
    • Planned to run for president in April 29 poll
    • Named interim prime minister in April, after coup toppled President Amadou Touman Toure
    • Led unity government announced in August
    • Resigned December 11 after arrest by soldiers
    Just minutes later, Diango Cissoko, a veteran public servant who has held posts in previous administrations, was named new interim prime minister by a decree read during the same news broadcast. 
     
    Late Monday, soldiers arrested Diarra at his home as he prepared to leave for France.
     
    Hours after his arrest, Diarra resigned his post on state television. 
     
    Diarra said he and his government were stepping down in the interest of peace.  He asked forgiveness from all Malians suffering from this crisis.  He thanked his collaborators and wished success to the "new team" that would succeed him. 
     
    Diarra gave no specific reason for his resignation and appeared to be reading from a prepared statement.  
     
    Mali is still reeling from a March 22 military coup.  Al-Qaida-linked Islamist militants have seized the northern half of the country, while the south remains mired in a power struggle between civilian and military leaders.
     
    The military junta said Diarra had to go because he had let his own personal political agenda get in the way of his duties to the nation. 
     
    Junta leader Captain Amadou Sanogo said on state television Tuesday night that the junta did not force Diarra to resign but merely "facilitated it." 
     
    Sanogo said Diarra did not resign under any pressure or violence.  Sanogo said the country will continue to move forward under a new prime minister.  But he says if anyone else tries to act out of excessive personal ambition or weigh down the system, he will not hesitate for one second to step in and help the president keep this person from working against Mali. 
     
    Sanogo said Diarra refused to recognize the president's authority and had become a "danger for Mali."  He also blamed the former prime minister for blocking efforts to re-equip the army.
     
    Sanogo denied that Diarra was under house arrest Tuesday and said instead that soldiers are guarding him for his safety.
     
    The international community condemned Diarra's arrest and subsequent resignation.  
     
    The United Nations Security Council said in a statement that the Malian army must stop interfering in the work of the transitional government and threatened measures, including targeted sanctions, against those working to undermine constitutional order and stability in Mali.

    Watch related video

    You May Like

    Brexit Vote Triggers Increase in Racist Attacks

    Britain's decision to leave European Union seen by some as 'permission' to unleash anti-immigrant resentment

    Russian Military Tests Readiness With Snap Inspections

    Some observers see surprise drill as tit-for-tat response to NATO’s recent multinational military exercises in Baltic region

    AIIB Takes Big Strides Amid Fears About China's Dominance

    Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank says it is independent, but concerns persist; China holds 20.6 percent of bank's shares, others have less than 7.5 percent each

    This forum has been closed.
    Comments
         
    There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

    By the Numbers

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Re-Opening Old Wounds in a Bullet-Riddled Cultural Landmarki
    X
    John Owens
    June 26, 2016 2:04 PM
    A cultural landmark before Lebanon’s civil war transformed it into a nest of snipers, Beirut’s ‘Yellow House’ is once again set to play a crucial role in the city.  Built in a neo-Ottoman style in the 1920s, in September it is set to be re-opened as a ‘memory museum’ - its bullet-riddled walls and bunkered positions overlooking the city’s notorious ‘Green Line’ maintained for posterity. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Re-Opening Old Wounds in a Bullet-Riddled Cultural Landmark

    A cultural landmark before Lebanon’s civil war transformed it into a nest of snipers, Beirut’s ‘Yellow House’ is once again set to play a crucial role in the city.  Built in a neo-Ottoman style in the 1920s, in September it is set to be re-opened as a ‘memory museum’ - its bullet-riddled walls and bunkered positions overlooking the city’s notorious ‘Green Line’ maintained for posterity. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Brexit Resounds in US Presidential Contest

    Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is resounding in America’s presidential race. As VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump sees Britain’s move as an affirmation of his campaign’s core messages, while Democrat Hillary Clinton sees the episode as further evidence that Trump is unfit to be president.
    Video

    Video New York Pride March A Celebration of Life, Mourning of Loss

    At this year’s march in New York marking the end of pride week, a record-breaking crowd of LGBT activists and allies marched down Manhattan's Fifth Avenue, in what will be long remembered as a powerful display of solidarity and remembrance for the 49 victims killed two weeks ago in an Orlando gay nightclub.
    Video

    Video NASA Juno Spacecraft, Nearing Jupiter, to Shed Light on Gas Giant

    After a five-year journey, the spacecraft Juno is nearing its destination, the giant planet Jupiter, where it will enter orbit and start sending data back July 4th. As Mike O'Sullivan reports from Pasadena, California, the craft will pierce the veil of Jupiter's dense cloud cover to reveal its mysteries.
    Video

    Video Brexit Vote Plunges Global Markets Into Uncharted Territory

    British voters plunged global markets into unknown territory after they voted Thursday to leave the European Union. The results of the Brexit vote, the term coined to describe the referendum, caught many off guard. Analysts say the resulting volatility could last for weeks, perhaps longer. Mil Arcega reports.
    Video

    Video Orlando Shooting Changes Debate on Gun Control

    It’s been nearly two weeks since the largest mass shooting ever in the United States. Despite public calls for tighter gun control laws, Congress is at an impasse. Democratic lawmakers resorted to a 1960s civil rights tactic to portray their frustration. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti explains how the Orlando, Florida shooting is changing the debate.
    Video

    Video Tunisian Fishing Town Searches for Jobs, Local Development Solutions

    As the European Union tries to come to grips with its migrant crisis, some newcomers are leaving voluntarily. But those returning to their home countries face an uncertain future.  Five years after Tunisia's revolution, the tiny North African country is struggling with unrest, soaring unemployment and plummeting growth. From the southern Tunisian fishing town of Zarzis, Lisa Bryant takes a look for VOA at a search for local solutions.
    Video

    Video 'American Troops' in Russia Despite Tensions

    Historic battle re-enactment is a niche hobby with a fair number of adherents in Russia where past military victories are played-up by the Kremlin as a show of national strength. But, one group of World War II re-enactors in Moscow has the rare distinction of choosing to play western ally troops. VOA's Daniel Schearf explains.
    Video

    Video Experts: Very Few Killed in US Gun Violence Are Victims of Mass Shootings

    The deadly shooting at a Florida nightclub has reignited the debate in the U.S. over gun control. Although Congress doesn't provide government health agencies funds to study gun violence, public health experts say private research has helped them learn some things about the issue. VOA's Carol Pearson reports.
    Video

    Video Muslim American Mayor Calls for Tolerance

    Syrian-born Mohamed Khairullah describes himself as "an American mayor who happens to be Muslim." As the three-term mayor of Prospect Park, New Jersey, he believes his town of 6,000 is an example of how ethnicity and religious beliefs should not determine a community's leadership. Ramon Taylor has this report from Prospect Park.
    Video

    Video Internal Rifts Over Syria Policy Could Be Headache for Next US President

    With the Obama administration showing little outward enthusiasm for adopting a more robust Syria policy, there is a strong likelihood that the internal discontent expressed by State Department employees will roll over to the next administration. VOA State Department correspondent Pam Dockins reports.
    Video

    Video Senegal to Park Colorful ‘Cars Rapide’ Permanently

    Brightly painted cars rapide are a hallmark of Dakar, offering residents a cheap way to get around the capital city since 1976. But the privately owned minibuses are scheduled to be parked for good in late 2018, as Ricci Shryock reports for VOA.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora