News / Middle East

Obama, Maliki to Discuss al-Qaida Threat in Iraq

Vice President Joe Biden walks with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki into the vice president's residence, the Naval Observatory, for a breakfast meeting, Oct. 30, 2013, in Washington.
Vice President Joe Biden walks with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki into the vice president's residence, the Naval Observatory, for a breakfast meeting, Oct. 30, 2013, in Washington.
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and President Barack Obama meet Friday at the White House.  On the eve of the talks, the Iraqi leader said a resurgent al-Qaida endangers Iraq, the region and the world.  

Prime Minister al-Maliki and others in the visiting Iraqi delegation have met with Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State John Kerry, other U.S. officials, and members of the U.S. Congress.

Speaking Thursday at the U.S. Institute of Peace in Washington, al-Maliki said a resurgent al-Qaida, helped by political upheaval in places like Syria and Libya, poses a threat to Iraq and the region.

He acknowledged a deterioration in Iraq and said the world should be worried about, and do everything possible to prevent, the success of al-Qaida.

"We are warning, and we are fearing, and we are worrying [about] the potential success of the terrorist organizations in Syria.  If God forbid they win, we and the whole world should do everything to prevent this, to prevent al-Qaida and other terrorist organizations to win in any country, not only in Syria and Iraq and Libya," said Maliki.

Al-Maliki and the White House voice similar positions on why violence has hit levels not seen since the worst period of Iraq's civil war between 2006 and 2008.  Attacks have killed as many as 7,000 people this year.

He said al-Qaida is primarily responsible for attacks he said target both Sunni and Shiite, though he added some Iraqis are assisting terrorists coming from outside the country.

Press Secretary Jay Carney says the United States is "deeply concerned" about the violence.

"It is important to focus on where this violence is coming from.  It is coming from al-Qaida and its affiliates.  They are trying to provoke cycles of sectarian reprisals, but we are confident they will not succeed," said Carney.

President Obama faces pressure from Congress to withhold new military aid unless al-Maliki agrees to improve governance and address criticisms he has shut Sunnis out of influence in government.

Dan Robinson's interview with Former US Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker
Dan Robinson's interview with Former US Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crockeri
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Former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq, Ryan Crocker says the U.S. and Iraq need a "joint strategy" to confront the al-Qaida threat, and says existing agreements provide the basis for enhanced counter-terrorism and intelligence cooperation.

But he says Prime Minister al-Maliki also needs to look at his own policies.

"To be sure the prime minister understands that al-Qaida is gaining traction because of sectarian and ethnic tensions in Iraq that they can exploit and that many of these tensions emanate from the prime minister's own policies," said Crocker.

Asked on Thursday about criticisms of the way he has governed, Prime Minister al-Maliki insisted he has adhered to Iraq's constitution.


"The Constitution is ruling in Iraq, the Constitution gives prerogatives, and this is something I state clearly.  Just let me know when I act in an unconstitutional way," said Maliki.

Former Ambassador Crocker says he hopes al-Maliki's visit leads to "more extensive, high-level engagement" with Iraq.

"We need the engagement of the Secretary of State, and the president himself, which we certainly had during my tenure, we need it again," he said.

Crocker serves on the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which oversees U.S. government funded international broadcasting, including the Voice of America.  

Briefing reporters ahead of Friday's White House talks, senior Obama administration officials said they continue to work with Congress on both an overall approach on Iraq, and the question of potential weapons sales.

The officials would not discuss specifics, but did not rule out enhanced intelligence cooperation to help Iraqi forces effectively fight al-Qaida networks coming from Syria.  

Both Prime Minister al-Maliki and U.S. officials have stressed the importance of steps to create a second "awakening" among tribal leaders in Iraq to help confront al-Qaida.  


Recent images from Iraq

  • Iraqi police help their wounded comrades after suicide bomb attacks at al-Riyadh police station in Hawija, north of Baghdad, Nov. 4, 2013.
  • A police officer checks papers at a checkpoint in central Baghdad, Oct. 31, 2013.
  • Residents gather at the site of a bomb attack in the town of Tuz Khurmatu, north of Baghdad, Oct. 31, 2013.
  • Baghdad municipality workers clear debris while people look at the site of a car bomb attack in the Sha'ab neighborhood of Baghdad, Oct. 27, 2013.
  • Women walk near the site of a car bomb at a bus station in Baghdad's Al-Mashtal district, Oct. 27, 2013.
  • A youth takes pictures with his mobile phone at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad's Al-Baladiyat District, Oct. 27, 2013.
  • Iraqi soldiers arrest suspected militants during a raid and weapons search operation in North Babil province, Oct. 27, 2013.
  • Mourners grieve as the body of a bomb attack victim is taken for burial during a funeral procession in al-Amel, Baghdad, Oct. 21, 2013.

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Comments
     
by: Mike from: California
November 01, 2013 12:13 AM
No more our blood, resources, and money. Sell them weapons at insane profits. We spent close to one trillion $ trying to install a democratic government: It is time for them to pay for any material help! All the different Muslim groups hate each other; there will never be a truly inclusive government. For them, in order to have peace, they need a ruthless dictator, even more ruthless than Sadam Hussein. With Sadam, Iraq was a balancing force in the Middle East: keeping Iran and others in check (with constant wars). By invading Iraq, we have really destabilized the region somewhat. We should really leave them alone, let them fight their ideological wars. The only way that wars may end in these regions is when one day a ruthless dictator would unite them. For that ruler to be successful, he will have to be ruthless and many many lives would be lost first. Are we willing to be that ruler? Obviously, not!

by: Markt
October 31, 2013 6:18 PM
It never ceases to amaze me...in one moment the countries of the Middle East are condemning American military action because it is destabilizing the region...then we leave. A moment later, they are complaining that without American military aid, their country is falling apart and they are powerless to do anything about it.
You can't have it both ways...either you want us there, or you don't. Personally, I think we need to stay out of any middle eastern troubles and let those countries resolve their own problems, as they have solved them for centuries, long before America was even founded. It is sectarian, it has always been sectarian and will always remain sectarian. After a few thousand years with the same problem, if they have yet to find a solution to it...they will never find it.

by: Abbass from: Egypt
October 31, 2013 11:05 AM
why not ask for Iranian military aid...?? Iraq today is another Hizbullah center...
In Response

by: Truth from: UK
October 31, 2013 4:23 PM
Iraq is a democracy, and Hezbollah is a legitimate defense organistion. In Egypt your multi billion dollar army is blockading gaza and killing muslims and women

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