News / Europe

Ukrainian PM Seeks International Support at UN

United States U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power speaks during an U.N. Security Council meeting on the Ukraine crisis, March 13, 2014
United States U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power speaks during an U.N. Security Council meeting on the Ukraine crisis, March 13, 2014
Margaret Besheer
Ukraine’s interim Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk appealed to the U.N. Security Council Thursday for its support to help stop Russia from annexing its Crimea region in a referendum planned for Sunday.

Yatsenyuk told the U.N.’s most powerful organ that his country is facing the military aggression of one of the council’s permanent members – Russia.

 “This aggression has no reasons and no grounds. This is absolutely and entirely unacceptable in the 21st century to resolve any kind of conflict with tanks, artillery and boots on the ground,” he said.

Yatsenyuk said despite Russia’s violation of a number of treaties, Ukraine still believes there is a chance to resolve the dispute peacefully and avoid the secession and annexation of Crimea this Sunday.

Speaking in Russian he addressed Moscow’s ambassador, asking him if Russia wants war saying,  “We are looking for an answer to the question whether Russians want war. I am sure as prime minister of Ukraine -- which for decades had warm and friendly relations with Russia -- I am convinced that Russians do not want war.”

Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin replied to Mr. Yatsenyuk during his remarks saying  “Russia does not want war and nor do the Russians. And I am convinced that Ukrainians don’t want this either. And furthermore, this is something I want to underscore, we do not see any premises to view and interpret the situation in such terms. We don’t want any further exacerbation of the situation,” said Churkin.  

Russia’s international isolation was evident, with even its closest ally, China, having taken a firm stance in support of Ukraine’s sovereignty and asserting its policy of non-interference in another state’s domestic affairs.

Earlier Thursday, the U.S. delegation circulated a draft resolution reaffirming the principles of Ukraine’s territorial integrity, sovereignty, and independence and that states that Sunday’s referendum is illegal, and urges nations to not recognize the results. The draft text does not name Russia as an aggressor nor explicitly demand it pull its troops back from Crimea.

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power said her Russian counterpart’s remarks seemed to be about validating the referendum and annexation of Crimea.

 “This causes us great alarm, which is one of the reasons that we have circulated this resolution, in the hopes of finding a vehicle for showing the extent of Russia’s isolation as it pursues a non-peaceful path,” said Power.  

Diplomats said they expect a Russian veto, but if Moscow’s close ally, China abstains, it would demonstrate Russia’s extensive international isolation. Several diplomats said they favored holding a vote by Saturday.  

Prime Minister Yatsenyuk also met with U.N. Chief Ban Ki-moon Thursday. Mr. Ban has repeatedly called on all parties to deescalate the situation and find a solution through political dialogue.   

Earlier in the day Secretary of State John Kerry told a congressional hearing the United States and the European Union will respond on Monday with a "serious series of steps" against Russia if a referendum on Ukraine's Crimea region goes ahead on Sunday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Thursday.

Kerry told a congressional hearing he hoped to avoid such steps, which include sanctions, through discussions with his Russian counterpart, Sergei Lavrov, in London on Friday.

Western Steps to Pressure Russia on Ukraine

  • The US authorized asset freezes and travel bans for those who have undermined Ukraine's territorial integrity
  • G7 leaders suspended preparations for G8 Summit in Sochi
  • OECD suspended talks on Russia joining the organization
  • EU suspended visa and investment talks with Moscow

The Russian Foreign Ministry said Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Kerry discussed proposals for resolving the crisis in Ukraine during a telephone conversation on Thursday.

Lavrov and Kerry, who are due to meet in London on Friday, discussed "the situation in Ukraine, taking into account existing Russian and U.S. proposals to normalize the atmosphere and provide for civil peace,'' the ministry said.

Germany warns Russia

Earlier, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Russia risks "massive" political and economic damage if it does not change course in the Ukraine crisis.

In a speech to the German parliament Thursday, Merkel said Ukraine's territorial integrity is "not up for discussion."

She also said the European Union will impose sanctions on Russia if it does not move to set up a contact group to discuss the Crimea crisis.

Commenting on possible ways out of the crisis, German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said that there was "hardly any hope" for a diplomatic solution at this point if the referendum goes forward, the German news agency DPA quoted him as saying.

He described the planned meeting between Kerry and Lavrov on Friday as "possibly the last chance."


  • An armed man, believed to be a Russian serviceman, stands guard outside an Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye, near the Crimean city of Simferopol, March 13, 2014.
  • A Ukrainian serviceman closes a gate as an armed man, believed to be a Russian serviceman, stands guard outside an Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye, near the Crimean city of Simferopol March 13, 2014.
  • A woman walks past a barricade as a Ukrainian flag flutters in the wind in Kyiv's Independence Square, March 13, 2014.
  • People talk about developments in Ukraine at a central square next to a statue of Soviet revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin in Donetsk, Ukraine, March 12, 2014.
  • A woman passes by posters in support of Ukraine during the International poster campaign, Kyiv, March, 12, 2014.
  • People talk in Independence Square, Kyiv, March, 12, 2014.
  • A woman holds a dog sporting shoes and a ribbon in the colors of the Russian flag outside the regional parliament building in Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine, March 12, 2014.
  • A member of a self-defense volunteer group, with makeshift shin guards bearing a picture of a wolf, polishes his boots in Kyiv's Independence Square, March 11, 2014. 
  • Members of a Crimean self-defense unit check the passport of a passenger at the railway station in Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine, March 11, 2014. 


About-face on monitors?

Russia has for the first time backed deployment of an OSCE monitoring mission in Ukraine, including Crimea, the chairman of the European rights and security watchdog said on Thursday, calling this a possible “big step forward.”

”The Russian Federation supported the idea of a rapid approval and rapid deployment of a special monitoring mission for Ukraine,” Thomas Greminger, Switzerland's ambassador to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, told reporters after a meeting of OSCE envoys in Vienna.

”This is clearly a positive development,” Greminger said. But a number of issues remained to be clarified in negotiations between the OSCE's 57 member states, he said.

Switzerland, which currently chairs the OSCE, has proposed sending a mission of about 100 monitors to Ukraine to look into human rights, ethnic issues, security and other factors to help defuse the crisis in the country.

Such a mission would require consensus among all members, giving Russia veto power.

Recent attempts by OSCE monitors to enter Crimea had been blocked by uniformed armed men, presumed to have been Russian soldiers.

Russian stocks slump

The Russian stock market hit a four-and-a-half-year low on Thursday and is down 20 percent since mid-February. The cost of insuring Moscow's debt against default rose to its highest level in nearly two years and is up by more than a third this month.

The crisis has already forced several Russian firms to put plans on hold for public offerings to raise cash abroad.

Yet none of that appears to have slowed down President Vladimir Putin, who told officials of the Paralympic Games he is hosting in Sochi that Russia was "not the initiator" of the crisis.


Some reporting by Reuters

You May Like

Australia-Cambodia Resettlement Agreement Raises Concerns

Agreement calls for Cambodia to accept refugees in return for $35 million in aid and reflects Australia’s harder line approach towards asylum seekers and refugees More

India Looks to Become Arms Supplier Instead of Buyer

US hopes India can become alternative to China for countries looking to buy weapons, but experts question growth potential of Indian arms industry More

Earth Day Concert, Rally Draws Thousands in Washington

President Obama also took up the issue Saturday in his weekly address, saying there 'no greater threat to our planet than climate change' More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 3
    Next 
by: Edward from: Oslo
March 14, 2014 3:14 AM
Russia =Nazi
In Response

by: Ally from: RF
March 14, 2014 12:25 PM
Excuse me, do not you refresh our memory - what country the soldiers planted a flag over the Reichstag in 1945? And what was the flag?)))

by: Willis Wake from: United States
March 13, 2014 8:57 PM
Where in hell are we going to borrow a billion bucks. To give away.

by: Steve from: Berkieley California
March 13, 2014 4:28 PM
Russia has been in the Crimea for two centuries. It's Black Sea Fleet guards its southern borders and it isn't likely all the bluster in the world from Merkel and Kerry (EU and US) will change Mr. Putin's mind. His responsibility you see isn't to the US or EU it is to Russia's interests and defense.
The US controls Guantonamo against the wishes of the Cuban government clearly a provocation and illegal under international law. But when did that trouble us?
We conquered Hawaii and subjugated its native populations making it a state by flying in lots of US citizens, sending missionaries and using dollar diplomacy. Today native Hawaiians are strangers in their own land. Clearly a violation of their human rights and so-called international law. The Chomorro people of Guam have lost most of the island to the US military and US interests and are a colony under military rule.
People who live in glass houses should never throw stones.
In Response

by: Ally from: RF
March 14, 2014 12:28 PM
We defeat of Nazi Germany and twenty million Russian died that we took x voyne.Poetomu city)
In Response

by: Tito from: Rome
March 14, 2014 3:17 AM
Kaliningrad area was part of Germany before WW2. So they have a right to take it back???

by: Dead Words
March 13, 2014 4:05 PM
Putin's army of paid commenters out in force as usual...
In Response

by: Anonymous
March 13, 2014 8:57 PM
correct.

by: Vasa from: Kiev
March 13, 2014 2:54 PM
I am Russian and I have been living in Ukraine for decade. I must to say that nobody wants to abuse me or kill me here. Russians are in full safety in Ukraine! Deliver us from evil Putin!!!!
In Response

by: Ruslan from: Russia
March 14, 2014 2:46 AM
Putin is one of the most respected politician of the world. What he does - defend Russian population in Crimea, which to say is majority (60%), from illegal nazist government of Ukraine. Your fatal mistake was to support the nazis but, unfortunatelly you can't recognize it..when you really realize what has happened in your Ukraine, it will be too late...your country will be lost, once again...history doesn't teach you, that's the sad fact!
In Response

by: Oleg from: Kiev
March 14, 2014 1:27 AM
Vasa is not Russian name.

by: Teodor from: Madrid
March 13, 2014 2:51 PM
Russia will not stop and invade the whole territory of Ukraine. Ukrainians don't want to be part of Russia, but Russia breaches international laws by annexing Crimea with guns in arms. We must stop it! If not, EU will be first to be affected. Baltic Estonia, Latvia are next targets. Having bought Russian gas,we made it strong. I think its right time to diversify gas delivering and to reduce percentage of Russian consumption in EU. Putin is crazy. He is doing what Hitler did....
In Response

by: Ruslan from: Russia
March 14, 2014 3:48 PM
to Teodor: you have no idea what you are writing about. Try to find some real stories about what is really going on in Ukraine and you will be surprised to find out that your comparison with Hitler is more appropriate for some of the new Ukrainian leaders. It's pity to witness how EU loses its face and transforms in a union with censured media and manipulated government controlled not domestically but from US... supporting the Nazis to come to power in Ukraine... it means you have no memory and no respect for those who died during WW2.

by: Carol Adams
March 13, 2014 2:12 PM
Mr. Kerry – This situation seems to be clear to everyone except you and Angela Merkel. You tried to pull Ukraine into the NATO alliance and Putin took steps to protect his fleet, which (in case you are unaware) is located in the Crimean Peninsula, which is a part of Ukraine. Putin is using a referendum to annex the Crimean peninsula. This scenario should look familiar to you. We did the same thing in Hawaii after we realized how vulnerable our fleet was over there. We made Hawaii a state and this process included a referendum. I know why the Obama administration is avoiding this obvious comparison. It puts the legitimacy of Obama’s presidency into question because of the ridiculous accusations of “birthers” who claim that Hawaii is not really a part of the USA. You need to address this and explain why these two situations are different. They are just too obviously similar.
In Response

by: Ally from: RF
March 14, 2014 12:31 PM
Why false libels written mostly anonymously???
In Response

by: Anonymous
March 13, 2014 8:20 PM
You can try and compare apples to oranges, fact of the matter is, Putin broke international law just last week, and invaded a country without the proper authority and without any knowledge of the UN what they were doing...

I hope the world now bitch slaps Putin economically.
In Response

by: Chris from: New York
March 13, 2014 4:42 PM
In the 19th century everyone just marched their armies into other countries and claimed land and sovereignty. After WWII the civilized world decided not to do it that way and set up rules and treaties. In 1994 Russia agreed to honor Ukraines border if it gave up it's nuclear weapons. Putin has ripped up that treaty because the government changed in Kyiv. Not like Hawaii statehood at all.

by: Anonymous
March 13, 2014 2:04 PM
Folks!! The referendum will go smoothly. If the pro Russia win, you will not support it; if not you will oppose. Is that? Then, what will be the outcome? Power? Power? Power? Hooray!!power!! We will see it. Please, don't provoke other contry's right.

by: Climp Jones
March 13, 2014 1:59 PM
President Obama will now combine Phone and Pen to send a threatening Text Message

by: Thought Criminal from: California
March 13, 2014 1:58 PM
Resistance to the IMF Banksters will not be permitted.
Comments page of 3
    Next 

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Are Energy Needs Putting Thailand's Natural Beauty at Risk?i
X
Steve Sandford
April 17, 2015 12:50 AM
Thailand's appetite for more electricity has led to the construction of new dams along the Mekong River to the north and new coal plants near the country's famous beaches in the south. A proposed coal plant in a so-called "green zone" has touched off a debate. VOA's Steve Sandford reports.
Video

Video Are Energy Needs Putting Thailand's Natural Beauty at Risk?

Thailand's appetite for more electricity has led to the construction of new dams along the Mekong River to the north and new coal plants near the country's famous beaches in the south. A proposed coal plant in a so-called "green zone" has touched off a debate. VOA's Steve Sandford reports.
Video

Video Overwhelmed by Migrants, Italy Mulls Military Action to Stabilize Libya

Thousands more migrants have arrived on the southern shores of Italy from North Africa in the past two days. Authorities say they expect the total number of arrivals this year to far exceed previous levels, and the government has said military action in Libya might be necessary to stem the flow. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
Video

Video Putin Accuses Kyiv of ‘Cutting Off’ Eastern Ukraine

Russian President Vladimir Putin, in his annual televised call-in program, again denied there were any Russian troops fighting in Ukraine. He also said the West was trying to ‘contain’ Russia with sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports on reactions to the president’s four-hour TV appearance.
Video

Video Eye Contact Secures Dog's Place in Human Heart

Dogs serve in the military, work with police and assist the disabled, and have been by our side for thousands of years serving as companions and loyal friends. We love them. They love us in return. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble reports on a new study that looks at the bio-chemical bond that cements that human-canine connection.
Video

Video Ukrainian Volunteers Search for Bodies of Missing Soldiers

As the cease-fire becomes more fragile in eastern Ukraine, a team of volunteer body collectors travels to the small village of Savur Mohyla in the what pro-Russian separatists call the Donetsk Peoples Republic - to retrieve bodies of fallen Ukrainian servicemen from rebel-held territories. Adam Bailes traveled with the team and has this report.
Video

Video Xenophobic Violence Sweeps South Africa

South Africa, long a haven for African immigrants, has been experiencing the worst xenophobic violence in years, with at least five people killed and hundreds displaced in recent weeks. From Johannesburg, VOA’s Anita Powell brings us this report.
Video

Video Sierra Leone President Koroma Bemoans Ebola Impact on Economy

In an interview with VOA's Shaka Ssali on Wednesday, President Ernest Koroma said the outbreak undermined his government’s efforts to boost and restructure the economy after years of civil war.
Video

Video Protester Lands Gyrocopter on Capitol Lawn

A 61-year-old mailman from Florida landed a small aircraft on the Capitol lawn in Washington to bring attention to campaign finance reform and what he says is government corruption. Wednesday's incident was one in a string of security breaches on U.S. government property. Zlatica Hoke reports the gyrocopter landing violated a no-fly zone.
Video

Video Apollo 13, NASA's 'Successful Failure,' Remembered

The Apollo 13 mission in 1970 was supposed to be NASA's third manned trip to the moon, but it became much more. On the flight's 45th anniversary, astronauts and flight directors gathered at Chicago's Adler Planetarium to talk about how the aborted mission changed manned spaceflight and continues to influence space exploration today. VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports.
Video

Video Badly Burned Ukrainian Boy Bravely Fights Back

A 9-year-old Ukrainian boy has returned to his native country after intensive treatment in the United States for life-threatening burns. Volodia Bubela, burned in a house fire almost a year ago, battled back at a Boston hospital, impressing doctors with his bravery. Faith Lapidus narrates this report from VOA's Tetiana Kharchenko.
Video

Video US Maternity Leave Benefits Much Less Than Many Countries

It was almost 20 years ago that representatives of 189 countries met at a UN conference in Beijing and adopted a plan of action to achieve gender equality around the world. Now, two decades later, the University of California Los Angeles World Policy Analysis Center has issued a report examining what the Beijing Platform for Action has achieved. From Los Angeles, Elizabeth Lee has more.
Video

Video Endangered Hawaiian Birds Get Second Chance

Of the world's nearly 9,900 bird species, 13 percent are threatened with extinction, according to BirdLife International. Among them are two Hawaiian honeycreepers - tiny birds that live in the forest canopy, and, as the name implies, survive on nectar from tropical flowers. Scientists at the San Diego Zoo report they have managed to hatch half a dozen of their chicks in captivity, raising hopes that the birds will flutter back from the brink of extinction. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Exhibit Brings Renaissance Master Out of the Shadows

The National Gallery of Art in Washington has raised the curtain on one of the most intriguing painters of the High Renaissance. Mostly ignored after his death in the early 1500s, Italian master Piero di Cosimo is now claiming his place alongside the best-known artists of the period. VOA’s Ardita Dunellari reports.
Video

Video Sidemen to Famous Blues Artists Record Their Own CD

Legendary blues singer BB King was briefly hospitalized last week and the 87-year-old “King of the Blues” may not be touring much anymore. But some of the musicians who have played with him and other blues legends have now released their own CD in an attempt to pass the torch to younger fans... and put their own talents out front as well. VOA’s Greg Flakus has followed this project over the past year and filed this report from Houston.
Video

Video Iran-Saudi Rivalry Is Stoking Conflict in Yemen

Iran has proposed a peace plan to end the conflict in Yemen, but the idea has received little support from regional rivals like Saudi Arabia. They accuse Tehran of backing the Houthi rebels, who have forced Yemen’s president to flee to Riyadh, and have taken over swaths of Yemen. As Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA, analysts say the conflict is being fueled by the Sunni-Shia rivalry between the two regional powers.

VOA Blogs