Somali Survey Methodology

How the Poll was done:

Three separate polls were conducted between 4/20/12 and 6/10/12.  Each poll carried out 1,075 successful telephone call interviews.  Phone numbers were drawn from a total database of over 20,000 telephone numbers.  Roughly twenty percent of those 20,000 numbers came from people who volunteered to participate in the survey, after hearing about it through the Somali service radio program. Some eighty percent of the telephone numbers in the base were drawn randomly from public access telephone directory lists.  Because the poll sample did not consistently use random methods, the results reflect only the views of those who were surveyed, and should not be assumed to reflect larger populations in Somalia.

All calls in the survey were made to the same five regions: Mogadishu, Puntland, Somaliland, south and central Somalia, and the Dadhaab refugee camp in Kenya. Numbers were dialed randomly. Each number was dialed only once.
Calls were made from Washington DC and from locations inside Somalia. All calls were made by staff working for Voice of America.

The calls were made through an open source software application developed by Google engineers for this purpose.

Who answered the Questions:

Most of the respondents to the survey were men. Most respondents were between the ages of 15 and 44. Most of the responses came from Mogadishu for reasons including population distribution and the ability of the software to make successful calls to areas with adequate telephone infrastructure. The fewest number of responses came from Dadhaab because of phone infrastructure and from south-central Somalia for reasons including the influence of insurgents.

Demographic and regional details of the responses can be found under survey “details.”

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