Michelle Obama Rallies Democrats

First lady Michelle Obama was center-stage Tuesday as Democrats opened their national convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.  Democratic speakers focused their appeals on two  important voting groups that continue to back President Barack Obama-women and Hispanic-Americans.

The first lady rallied fellow Democrats with a personal and, at times, emotional speech, talking from the heart about her husband, her family and the values they have tried to promote over the past four years in the White House.

“I love that for Barack, there is no such thing as "us" and "them" - he doesn't care whether you're a Democrat, a Republican or none of the above. He knows that we all love our country…and he's always ready to listen to good ideas. He’s always looking for the very best in everyone he meets," she said.

Obama then brought the delegates to their feet with an impassioned plea to help re-elect her husband in November, an appeal that seemed to target women voters.

“If we want to give all our children a foundation for their dreams and opportunities worthy of their promise…if we want to give them that sense of limitless possibility - that belief that here in America, there is always something better out there if you're willing to work for it…then we must work like never before…and we must once again come together and stand together for the man we can trust to keep moving this great country forward…my husband, our president, President Barack Obama," she said.

  • President Barack Obama waves after his speech at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 6, 2012.
  • Vice President Joe Biden and President Barack Obama wave to the delegates at the conclusion of President Obama's speech at the Democratic National Convention, September 6, 2012.
  • President Barack Obama and First lady Michelle Obama joined by their children Sasha, left, and Malia walks across the stage after President Obama's speech to the Democratic National Convention.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama (L) embraces former President Bill Clinton onstage after Clinton nominated Obama for re-election during the second session of Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 5, 2012
  • U.S. President Barack Obama (L) joins former President Bill Clinton onstage after Clinton nominated Obama for re-election during the second session of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 5, 2012.
  • Former President Bill Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 5, 2012
  • First Lady Michelle Obama waves after addressing the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 3, 2012.
  • Delegates cheer as First lady Michelle Obama addresses the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates recite the Pledge of Allegiance at the opening of the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • A woman records the invocation at the Democratic National Convention, Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates await the start of the first day of the convention, September 4, 2012.
  • A group of third grade students rehearse saying the Pledge of Allegiance ahead of the first day of the convention in Time Warner Cable Arena, September 4, 2012.
  • Advertisements for the DNC line the walls at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport.
  • Protesters block an intersection near the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina for several hours while surrounded by police who allow the demonstration to continue, September 4, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates tour the floor ahead of the convention, September 3, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Programs laid out for guests inside the convention center. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • The Charlotte, North Carolina skyline seen through the window of an airplane, September 2, 2012.
  • President Barack Obama's campaign manager Jim Messina tours the floor at the Democratic National Convention, September 3, 2012.
  • Delegates and Democratic National Convention visitors crowd one of the merchandise stores in Charlotte, September 3, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
  • Delegates await the start of the first day of the Democratic National Convention, September 4, 2012.
  • A 15-ton sand sculpture of President Obama is on display outside the convention. The sand comes from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. (J. Featherly/VOA)


In addition to reaching out to women voters, the Democrats opened their convention with numerous overtures to Hispanic-Americans, a growing voting bloc in the United States.

Public opinion polls show the president currently enjoys a huge advantage over Republican Mitt Romney among Hispanic voters, something Republicans tried to address at their convention last week in Tampa, Florida.

San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro addresses the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, Sept. 4, 2012.San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro addresses the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, Sept. 4, 2012.
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San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro addresses the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, Sept. 4, 2012.
San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro addresses the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, Sept. 4, 2012.
Democrats sought to highlight their support among Hispanics by having the mayor of San Antonio, Texas, Julian Castro, give the keynote address, the main thematic speech of the convention.

Castro is seen by some as a rising star in the Democratic Party, and he spoke of his own family's journey from Mexico to highlight the contributions of immigrants who are drawn to the American Dream.

“My family's story isn't special.  What's special is the America that makes our story possible.  Ours is a nation like no other, a place where great journeys can be made in a single generation.  No matter who you are or where you come from, the path is always forward," said Castro.

With polls showing the race a dead heat at the moment, President Obama is counting on a big turnout of Hispanic voters in November. But pollster John Zogby says the Obama campaign has work to do to make sure those voters get out to the polls.

“Hispanics who are undecided are probably not going to vote, or at least many of them will not vote. That's a huge problem and he [Obama] has some work to do among Hispanics," he said.

Much of the evening was devoted to defending President Obama's economic record, combined with a critique of the Republican ticket of Mitt Romney and his vice presidential running mate, Paul Ryan.

But there were occasional mentions of the Obama record on foreign policy, including praise from former president Jimmy Carter, who addressed the convention through a video message.

“Overseas, President Obama has restored the reputation of the United States within the world community. Dialogue and collaboration are once again possible with a return of a spirit of trust and goodwill to our foreign policy," said Carter.

On Wednesday, the delegates will hear from former President Bill Clinton, who retains rock star status within the party. The convention builds to a dramatic climax on Thursday when President Obama gives his nomination acceptance speech before a national television audience.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Godwin from: Nigeria
September 05, 2012 8:56 AM
It appears VOA is decisive in the choice of contributions to be published. In other word should the media house take sides in matters of opinion concerning articles they have published and ask people to comment on? If this kind of poll has to be one sided, how is your president and/or his wife measure the feelings of people both within and outside? That is a disservice to the people you purport to serve if their opinions do not reach the public or those who may need it either to ginger them or to change course. But whether you like it or not, Mrs. Obama is not a good example of a mother for the nation of America by her support of her husband's wrong policies that degrade morals. PERIOD

by: heshukui from: china
September 05, 2012 7:28 AM
Good!

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