News / USA

    US Surveys: Trump Support Weakening as 4 More States Vote

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Madison, Miss., March 7, 2016.
    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Madison, Miss., March 7, 2016.
    VOA News

    New political surveys in the United States show support for Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump may be eroding as voters cast ballots Tuesday in nominating contests in four more states.

    A new Washington Post/ABC News poll showed 34 percent of Republicans still favor the billionaire real estate mogul, compared to 25 percent for Texas Senator Ted Cruz, 18 percent for Florida Senator Marco Rubio and 13 percent for Ohio Governor John Kasich.

    That's a narrower Trump lead than in previous surveys conducted by the newspaper and television network.

    The same poll also showed that Trump trails both Cruz and Rubio in head-to-head matchups if the one-time 17-candidate field is winnowed further.

    Lead narrowing

    An NBC News/Survey Monkey poll showed Trump with a bigger lead of nearly 2-to-1 (39 percent to 20 percent) over Cruz, with Rubio and Kasich trailing, but that margin was also narrower than it had been.

    Audience members listen as Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a campaign rally, in Dearborn, Mich., March 7, 2016.
    Audience members listen as Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a campaign rally, in Dearborn, Mich., March 7, 2016.

    The new surveys come at a time when establishment Republicans, including the party's losing 2012 nominee, Mitt Romney, have embarked on an all-out effort to thwart Trump, a political novice and one-time television reality show host, from winning the party's presidential nomination.

    They fear he is too unpredictable and would lose to the leading Democratic candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, in November’s national election to succeed President Barack Obama, who leaves office in January 2017.

    The four remaining Republican contenders face voters in four distinctly different states on Tuesday, the country’s car manufacturing hub in Michigan, the conservative Deep South state of Mississippi, the sparsely populated western state of Idaho and the Pacific island state of Hawaii.

    Polls show Trump ahead in Michigan and Mississippi, but there have been scant surveys in the other two states.

    Party convention

    The candidates are vying for delegates to July’s Republican national convention Cleveland, where the party’s presidential nominee will be picked. Trump is ahead so far in the contest, but nowhere near a majority in the months-long campaign.

    Republican U.S. presidential candidate John Kasich addresses supporters during a campaign stop in the gymnasium of University Liggett School in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich., March 7, 2016.
    Republican U.S. presidential candidate John Kasich addresses supporters during a campaign stop in the gymnasium of University Liggett School in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich., March 7, 2016.

    Delegate Count

    Here is an estimated delegate count for each candidate:

    Republicans

    Donald Trump: 621
    Ted Cruz: 396
    John Kasich: 138

    Democrats

    Hillary Clinton: 1,561
    Bernie Sanders: 800

    Total delegates needed for party nomination:

    Democrats: 2,383

    Republicans: 1,237

    * As of March 16, 2016

    Tuesday’s biggest prize is Michigan and its 59 delegates.

    Candidates will win a share of those delegates based on their proportion of the vote count, just as they will with the 91 total delegates available in Mississippi, Idaho and Hawaii.

    In the Democratic race, primaries are only being held in Michigan and Mississippi.

    Clinton has held big leads in polls in both states over Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, a democratic socialist who is her lone challenger.

    Clinton holds a huge delegate lead and at recent campaign events has talked about a potential matchup against Trump in the November election.

    She told supporters Monday in Michigan the sooner she becomes the Democratic nominee, the more she can focus on the Republicans.

    The Democratic national convention will be held in Philadelphia in July.

    Independent: No campaign

    Also Monday, former three-term New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced he will not make a third-party run.

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a rally at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History, in Detroit, Mich., March 7, 2016.
    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a rally at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History, in Detroit, Mich., March 7, 2016.

    Bloomberg spent months considering running as an independent, but said in an editorial posted by the Bloomberg View that he does not believe he could win the election and that there would be a good chance his candidacy would lead to Trump or Cruz being elected.

    "That is not a risk I can take in good conscience," he added.

    The 74-year-old Democrat-turned-Republican-turned-Democrat-turned Independent lambasted Trump, saying, "He has run the most divisive and demagogic presidential campaign I can remember, preying on people’s prejudices and fears."

    In an effort to block Trump from capturing the party's 2016 presidential nomination, conservative and Republican groups are mounting acerbic new television advertising campaigns.

    In all, several anti-Trump organizations say they plan to spend at least $10 million in the next week on the ads.

    Attack ads

    Many of them are aimed at voters in the southeastern state of Florida and the Midwestern state of Illinois, two delegate-rich states where Republicans are holding March 15 party nominating elections and political surveys show Trump with leads over his remaining three opponents.

    Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas calls upon his supporters get out the vote during Mississippi's primary Tuesday, during a campaign stop in Florence, Miss., March 7, 2016.
    Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas calls upon his supporters get out the vote during Mississippi's primary Tuesday, during a campaign stop in Florence, Miss., March 7, 2016.

    The ads characterize Trump as a liberal out of touch with the dominant conservative character of the Republican party, a military draft dodger, and a tycoon with little empathy for the powerless who have stood in the path of his business empire.

    Club for Growth Action, a conservative, anti-tax organization, has one ad running in Florida, saying Trump "hides behind bankruptcy laws to duck paying his bills and kill American jobs. He even tried to kick an elderly widow out of her home through eminent domain. Real tough guy."

    Another group, American Future Fund, called Trump, a one-time television reality show host, a draft dodger who has disparaged American prisoners of war captured by the North Vietnamese more than four decades ago and "hasn't served his country a day in his life. Donald Trump is a phony. Stop him now."

    Rather than respond to the ad campaign against him with television ads of his own, Trump said he would continue to attack his opponents with tweets from his Twitter account.

    "We cannot let the failing Republican establishment, who could not stop Obama, ruin the movement with millions of dollars in false ads!" Trump said Monday.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: francis
    March 10, 2016 1:31 PM
    get Trump the ticket

    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    March 08, 2016 1:19 PM
    Trump’s still leading after-all the blasting from party/paid adverts, like Romney playing his Trump-card. If after-all that thrashing Trump remains on top, then he’s the superman Americans want! Sometimes it’s good to deviate from the normal and do the unusual, like Americans choosing someone who isn’t professional/career politician to lead them, maybe having become disenchanted with the so-called usual politicians who make promises not meant to be kept. Imagine Biden playing the word-game over terrorist ISIS.

    The words are beautiful but have neither meaning nor intent to be achieved. Like Obama drawing the red-line on Syria that when crossed caught him napping. Like the empty promise to Ukraine what NATO’d do if Crimea isn’t returned the next moment; Like giving away a superpower jitters at Iran nuclear program when Obama said everything on the give-away that emboldened Iran to become more audacious in hope. Like the toothless NATO expected to stand up to Russia. But Trump goes on reality to say USA can’t have a better ally… than Russia. Like that in every other area, Trump intends to be the change the Americans want. If he wins in the long run, Glory to God, for Trump’d be more than superhuman.
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    March 09, 2016 3:34 AM
    @Godwin:

    You seem to be more like a Turkish AKP puppet writer.

    You just wrote all Turkish propaganda topics in one sentence.

    by: Ricardo from: Brazil
    March 08, 2016 9:20 AM
    There are certain peculiarities in the American democracy that leave me puzzled. Today the political separation of the Congress is not based on ideological differences, but purely by the power struggle. President Obama has a good proposal to the government, but is barred by the Senate, regardless of the matter.

    I admire freedom and democracy in the U.S, but I think the country, unfortunately, was not prepared to have an African American President.

    If Ms. Clinton win the election I wish her a better luck. Despite the women who ruled the Latin America countries have disappointed their people, I still believe in women's ability to rule a nation, and the United States would be the best example.
    In Response

    by: Marcus Aurelius II from: NJ USA
    March 08, 2016 11:52 AM
    You would do well to study the American government's system of checks and balances. It might help you unravel your puzzle. No one individual or group can dictate what the government will or won't do. The US Constitution was engineered to prefer paralysis over dictatorship. If different branches of government can't agree, nothing will happen. The balance of power in the division of powers and the separation of powers has been very carefully worked out. Confrontation about who has power only exists at the margins. In substance they either cooperate or they sit helpless. It has worked well for over 200 years.

    The most important thing about choosing elected officials are who is more capable, not what race or gender they are. In nations where elections are won and lost by such artificial divisions such as tribal affiliation or religion usually turns out to be a disaster.
    In Response

    by: Jonathan Pulliam from: Planet Earth
    March 08, 2016 10:32 AM
    Obama hasn't made much of an attempt to govern, only to fund-raise. I'm a vociferous critic of Obama, yet I must disagree with your typically Brazilian racist mischaracterization as regards Obama's race. His opponents articulate strong positions against Obama's misguided non-starter ideas and command-government ideology, they don't concern themselves with his "race". I'd not, moreover that you are not content to malign blacks, you also appear to reflexively adopt a misogynistic "anti-women" tone in your misinformed post.

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