News / Middle East

ISIL Militants in Iraq Seize Border Crossings

A fighter with the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) takes control of a traffic intersection in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, June 22, 2014.
A fighter with the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) takes control of a traffic intersection in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, June 22, 2014.
VOA News
Sunni militants in Iraq have seized two more border crossings, one with Syria and one with Jordan, in addition to the four nearby towns captured by insurgent forces since Friday.
 
Jordan began to beef up border security after the crossings fell Sunday.
 
Security officials say the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) is now in control of Qaim, Rawa, Ana and Rutba in Iraq's western Anbar province.
 
The blitz takes the al-Qaida-inspired group closer to its goal of carving out a purist Islamic state straddling both Syria and Iraq.
 
Meanwhile, at least six people were killed Sunday by a suicide bomber and a car bomb in the provincial capital of Ramadi. The attack targeted mourners at the funeral of an Iraqi police officer.

In a televised interview, U.S. President Barack Obama warned that the insurgents' strength could grow and destabilize other countries in the Middle East.

The American leader said the U.S. must remain "vigilant," but would not "play 'Whac-A-Mole' and send U.S. troops occupying various countries wherever these organizations pop up."
 
Demonstrators protest outside of the White House in Washington against renewed U.S. involvement in Iraq in Washington, D.C., June 21, 2014.Demonstrators protest outside of the White House in Washington against renewed U.S. involvement in Iraq in Washington, D.C., June 21, 2014.
x
Demonstrators protest outside of the White House in Washington against renewed U.S. involvement in Iraq in Washington, D.C., June 21, 2014.
Demonstrators protest outside of the White House in Washington against renewed U.S. involvement in Iraq in Washington, D.C., June 21, 2014.

The United States has begun a new diplomatic bid to unite Iraq's fractious leaders and repel insurgents.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry landed in Egypt Sunday at the start of a visit to the Middle East and Europe, mainly to consult with partners about Iraq, where Sunni militants have made new advances in an offensive that has alarmed the world. 

Kerry's unannounced stop in Cairo early Sunday was part of a diplomatic mission to push Egypt toward democracy.

While in Cairo, Kerry said the U.S. wanted the Iraqi people to find a leadership that is prepared to represent all Iraqis but that Washington would not pick or choose the leadership in Baghdad.

Kerry also urged Iraqi leaders to rise above "sectarian considerations," and said that Washington was "not responsible" for the crisis.

Kerry will stop in Jordan Sunday before heading to Brussels for the NATO foreign ministers' meeting, and then to Paris for meetings with regional partners and Gulf allies.  

Iran reaction

Iran's top leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said Sunday he is against U.S. intervention in neighboring Iraq, where Islamic extremists and Sunni militants opposed to Tehran have seized a number of towns and cities, the official IRNA news agency reported.

The statement by Khamenei was the clearest statement of opposition to a U.S. plan to dispatch of up to 300 military advisers in response to pleas from the Iraqi government and runs counter to speculation that old enemies Washington and Tehran might cooperate to defend their mutual ally in Baghdad.
 
“We strongly oppose the intervention of the U.S. and others in the domestic affairs of Iraq,” Khamenei was quoted as saying, in his first reaction to the crisis.
 
“The main dispute in Iraq is between those who want Iraq to join the U.S. camp and those who seek an independent Iraq,” said Khamenei, who has the final say over government policies. “The U.S. aims to bring its own blind followers to power since the U.S. is not happy about the current government in Iraq.”
 
Khamenei said Iraq's government and its people, with help of top clerics, would be able to end the “sedition” there, saying extremists are hostile to both Shi'ites and Sunnis who seek an independent Iraq.
 
Earlier on Sunday Iran's President Hassan Rouhani said some countries “feed terrorists by their petrodollars,” in a veiled reference to the Arab Gulf states, and warned that such support would come back to haunt them.

Rouhani has said his countrymen will not hesitate to defend Shi'ite shrines in Iraq if need be, but he has also said, like Khamenei, that Iraqis are capable of doing that job themselves.
 
Thousands of Shi'ite Iraqis have responded to calls to take up arms and defend the country against the insurgency.

Tehran and Washington have been shocked by the lightning quick offensive, spearheaded by ISIL, that has seen large swathes of northern and western Iraq fall to the hardline extremist group and other Sunni fighters since June 10, including the north's biggest city Mosul.

Strategic towns

The towns of Qaim, Rawah, Anah and Rutba are the first seized in the mainly Sunni Anbar province since fighters from the ISIL and their allies overran the city of Fallujah and parts of the provincial capital of Ramadi earlier this year.
 
The capture of Rawah on the Euphrates River and the nearby town of Anah appeared to be part of a march toward a key dam in the city of Haditha, the destruction of which would damage the country's electrical grid and cause major flooding.
 
Taking Rutba gives the insurgents control over the final stretch of a major highway to neighboring Jordan, a key artery for passengers and goods that has been infrequently used for months because of deteriorating security.
 
Iraqi military officials said more than 2,000 troops were quickly dispatched to the site of the dam to protect it. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media, Reuters reported.

There was a lull in fighting at Iraq's largest refinery, Beiji, near Tikrit, on Sunday morning.

The site had been transformed into a battlefield since Wednesday as Sunni fighters launched an assault on the plant. Militants entered the large compound but were held off by Iraqi military units.
 
A black column of smoke rose from the site. Refinery officials said it was caused by a controlled burning of waste.

Chief military spokesman, Lt. Gen. Qassim al-Moussawi, acknowledged the fall of the Anbar towns, saying government forces had made a tactical retreat and planned to retake them. He provided no further details.
 
The Islamic State and allied militants have carved out a large fiefdom along the Iraqi-Syrian border. Control over crossings like that one in Qaim allows them to more easily move weapons and heavy equipment. Rebels control the Syrian side of the crossing.

Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's Shi'ite-dominated government has struggled to push back against the Sunni militants, who have seized large swaths of the country's north since taking control of Mosul on June 10 as troops melted away.

US response

Iraq has requested U.S. airstrikes to help halt the advance, but Obama has yet to order any, and has instead called on Iraqi leaders to form a more representative government in thinly veiled criticism of al-Maliki.

The U.S., however, has been drawn back into the conflict.

It is deploying up to 300 military advisers to join about 275 troops in and around Iraq to provide security and support for the U.S. Embassy and other American interests.
 
The fighting has threatened to tear the country apart for good, reducing Iraq to separate Sunni, Shi'ite and ethnic Kurdish regions. It has highlighted divisions among regional powers, especially Iran, which has said it would not hesitate to protect Shi'ite shrines in Iraq if asked, and Sunni Saudi Arabia, which has warned Iran to stay out of Iraq.
 
Iraq's Kurds have meanwhile expanded their territory in the northeast, including the long-prized oil city of Kirkuk.

Relations between the diverse Sunni groups have not been entirely smooth.

On Sunday morning, clashes raged for a third day between ISIL and Sunni tribes backed by the Naqshbandi Army, a group led by former army officers and Baathists, around Hawija, local security sources and tribal leaders said, Reuters reported.

On Saturday, heavily armed Shi'ite fighters paraded in Baghdad in a dramatic show of force aimed at Sunni militants who seized an Iraqi town that borders Syria, widening a western front in an offensive threatening to rip apart the country.

Thousands of fighters loyal to powerful Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr have vowed to fight ISIL, which now controls a large portion of northern and western Iraq, and has been moving closer to the capital.

Some information for this report provided by Reuters and AP.

You May Like

UN: 1 Million Somalis at Risk of Hunger

Group warns region is in dire need of humanitarian aid, with at least 200,000 children under age of five acutely malnourished as drought hits southern, central part of nation More

Human Rights Groups Allege Supression of Freedoms in Thailand

Thailand’s military, police have suppressed release of independent report assessing human rights in kingdom during first 100 days of latest coup More

Jennifer Lawrence Contacts FBI After Nude Photos Hacked

'Silver Linings Playbook' actress' photos were posted on image-sharing forum 4chan; Federal Bureau of Investigations is looking into matter More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: eusebio manuel vestias from: Portugal
June 23, 2014 4:48 PM
Diplomacy the peace on Iraq


by: 1worldnow from: Earth
June 23, 2014 3:25 AM
TRUTH TO BE TOLD: OK, Meanbill, you are the leading expert on conspiracy theories, we get it. (Is this you, Larry S?) Especially since most of your conspiracy theories have the dire untones of anti-Americanism. You win.

All our theories and postulations have done nothing to stop the suffering of the people in this world, mostly at the hands of religious extremists, thugs, gangs, drug cartels, politicians, etc.

Regardless of the lies from our government (yeah, Clinton was innocent too, Reagan (Iran/Contra), and the neverending blame-Bush campaign) will not change the 'truth to be told' (should I use all caps, meanbill?).

In order to be a Muslim, you have to cleanse the world of infidels. Period. In order to be a Muslim, you have to fullfill Muhammeds vision, not an option. A blood Muslim (yes, the same terminology used by the Hebrews) can never be anything other than a Muslim, ever. The leader of the free world was born and raised a Sunni 'blood' Muslim. Why the emphasis on 'blood'? Because converts are the lower-class, and the most insignificant Muslim. Just like if I were to convert to Judiasm, I would be welcomed in the synagogs and bar mitzvas, but not in the heirarchy. The leader of the free world was born, by blood, a Sunni Muslim. So, meanbill, check on this conspiracy theory. You will not have to reasearch too hard. It's so obvious.

The leader of the free world did convert to Christianity, yahoo. But he will always be a Sunni Muslim patriot. Always. Hmmmmmm, Meanbill? Why was he so quick to pull out of Iraq first, yet, so reluctant to help now? Let me think on this one.....

Our leaders handling this issue in the Middle East, with all the talking and 'we have options on the table' rhetoric, is pathetic, to put it nicely. Imagine your house is on fire and the fire department shows up to simply discuss how to handle the fire? Meanwhile, the police chief holds a press conference to discuss your house being on fire. Might as well grab some marshmallows.


by: Mark from: washinton
June 22, 2014 3:38 PM
This is an effort to simply strengthen ties with Egypt for defense strategy only to little to late but they will take the money!
Spend the money on our poor vets at home.


by: Mike from: Virginia
June 22, 2014 3:31 PM
All the blood shed for some of these provinces being taken over and for what?
Many documentaries of special forces and other teams patrolling and in some cases dying in these areas, but now we see it was for nothing as these places are so easily taken over.
Pretty sickening for young people to see this and then to think more young ones will be asked to go to these messed up provinces for some polical agenda.

In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
June 22, 2014 5:47 PM
IN REBUTTAL -- Not one single US military man or woman died, or was wounded, fighting for Iraq or for the Iraqi people, (and if), any US military men or women died fighting in Iraq, they did it to destroy the "weapons of mass destruction" that US Secretary of State Colin Powell convinced the UN and the world, with fabricated and falsified evidence, that Saddam had, and would use them against his neighbors... (REMMBER?)

REMEMBER why the US invaded Iraq? -- The US invaded Iraq to destroy the "Weapons of Mass Destruction" Saddam allegedly possessed, (and), they did not invade Iraq to bring freedom or democracy to the Iraq people or their country, did they?

FACTUAL FACTS? -- Not one single US Military man or woman was killed or wounded fighting for any Iraqis or their country, were they? --- The US invaded Iraq to destroy Saddam's "weapons of mass destruction" (and), to kill Saddam and his sons, (and), thoughts about the Iraqi people and the Iraq country. came afterwards.....


by: Not Again from: Canada
June 22, 2014 12:16 PM
This sit, Iran's position, is not unexpected; the Maliki gvmt has promoted Shia hegemony over all others, to the full detriment of the Sunni and Kurdish population of Iraq; right from the onset of the Maliki gvmt, it was observed that he was propped up by the pro Iranian Shia Sadr militia. Essentially, right from the start, the Bush administration should have had a clear view that the Saddam Hussein dictatorship, was being replaced by a Shia centric gvmt. The results are now clearly evident and conclusive, that a multi--ethnic state does not have a good chance of survival, if the gvmt is not inclined to include all the constituent people; for that very reason, Maliki, refused to sign an agreement that would keep the US administration engaged on the ground; and notwithstanding that the Bush administration tried for almost two years to achieve an agreement, it was a failed attempt.


by: meanbill from: USA
June 22, 2014 11:22 AM
TRUTH BE TOLD -- There was a little over 3,000 Sunni (ISIL) terrorists that entered Iraq to get Sunni Muslim recruits and establish a Sunni Caliphate, -- (AND NOW?) -- the other Sunni terrorists groups, and Sunni tribes and civilians, and the Sunni military army and air force, have joined the Sunni (ISIL) terrorists to form a Caliphate, or destroy the Shia led Iraq government.....

The US, EU, and NATO countries say, that the Sunni (ISIL) terrorists have seized many towns and cities, (but in reality), those towns and cities the Sunni (ISIL) control, were just given to them by their Sunni residents, and Sunni army, (and), they didn't have to fight any battles for them...

NOW the US, EU, and NATO countries give advice to Maliki on trying to end the Sunni Muslim uprising, by inclusion of more "unelected" Sunni Muslims and Kurds in the Shia "elected" majority Iraq government, (and), these are the same US, EU, and NATO countries, that arm and train the extremists/terrorists in Jordan and Turkey, that are killing Shia Muslims in Syria and Iraq, (and), if Maliki trusts their advice, he'd be crazy, wouldn't he be? --- PS; (Don't trust the man who bowed to the Wahhabi Sunni Saudi King)

MALIKI needs the courage and wisdom of King Solomon, to defeat this Sunni uprising, and ignore the advice of those who arm and train those who kill the Shia Muslims in Syria and Iraq, (and somehow), find a way to win this Sunni Muslim uprising with an army that's about 50% Sunni Muslim, that refuse to fight the Sunni Muslim terrorists, or any other Sunni Muslims attacking the Shia led Government. -- (King Solomon himself with all of his wisdom, and with God helping him, couldn't win this Sunni uprising, with half of his army, joining on the side of his enemies)....


by: Ben from: Philadelphia
June 22, 2014 11:01 AM
Great, let's have a few more military parades in Baghdad then... preferable to actually fighting.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ukraine Schools Resume Classes, Donate to Government Forcesi
X
September 02, 2014 12:58 PM
A new school year has started in Ukraine but thousands of children in the war-torn east are unable to attend because of ongoing clashes with pro-Russia rebels. In Ukraine's capital, patriotic education has become the norm along with donations to support injured security forces fighting to take back rebel-held areas. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video Ukraine Schools Resume Classes, Donate to Government Forces

A new school year has started in Ukraine but thousands of children in the war-torn east are unable to attend because of ongoing clashes with pro-Russia rebels. In Ukraine's capital, patriotic education has become the norm along with donations to support injured security forces fighting to take back rebel-held areas. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video US Detainees Want Negotiators for Freedom in North Korea

The three U.S. detainees held in North Korea were permitted to speak with foreign media Monday. The government of Kim Jong Un restricted the topics of the questions, and the interviews in Pyongyang were limited to five minutes. Each of the men asked Washington to send a representative to Pyongyang to secure his release. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti has our story.
Video

Video Internet, Technology Offer New Tools for Journalists

The Internet and rapidly evolving technology is quickly changing how people receive news and how journalists deliver it. There are now more ways to tell a story than ever before. One school in Los Angeles is teaching the next generation of journalists with the help of a state-of-the-art newsroom. Elizabeth Lee has this report.
Video

Video Turkmen From Amerli Describe Survival of IS Siege

Over the past few weeks, hundreds of Shi'ite Turkmen have fled the town of Amerli seeking refuge in the northern city of Kirkuk. Despite recent military gains after U.S. airstrikes that were coordinated with Iraqi and Kurdish forces, the situation remains dire for Amerli’s residents. Sebastian Meyer went to Kirkuk for VOA to speak to those who managed to escape.
Video

Video West Africa Ebola Vaccine Trials Possible by Early 2015

A U.S. health agency is speeding up clinical trials of a possible vaccine against the deadly Ebola virus that so far has killed more than 1,500 people in West Africa. If successful, the next step would be a larger trial in countries where the outbreak is occurring. VOA's Carol Pearson has more.
Video

Video Survivors Commemorate 70th Anniversary of Nazi Liquidation of Jewish Ghetto

When the German Nazi army occupied the Polish city of Lodz in 1939, it marked the beginning of a long nightmare for the Jewish community that once made up one third of the population. Roughly 200,000 people were forced into the Lodz Ghetto. Less than 7,000 survived. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, some survivors gathered at the Union League Club in Chicago on the 70th anniversary of the liquidation of the Lodz Ghetto to remember those who suffered at the hands of the Nazi regime.
Video

Video Cost to Raise Child in US Continues to Rise

The cost of raising a child in the United States continues to rise. In its latest annual report, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says middle income families with a child born in 2013 can expect to spend more than $240,000 before that child turns 18. And sending that child to college more than doubles that amount. VOA’s Deborah Block visited with a couple with one child in Alexandria, Virginia, to learn if the report reflects their lifestyle.
Video

Video Chaotic Afghan Vote Recount Threatens Nation’s Future

Afghanistan’s troubled presidential election continues to be rocked by turmoil as an audit of the ballots drags on. The U.N. says the recount will not be completed before September 10. Observers say repeated disputes and delays are threatening the orderly transfer of power and could have dangerous consequences. VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports.

AppleAndroid