News / Asia

Missing Malaysian Jet May Have Turned Back

Search for Missing Plane Expands, as Do Questionsi
|| 0:00:00
...
 
🔇
X
William Ide
March 09, 2014 7:32 PM
It has been more than a day and a half since Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 vanished on its way to Beijing, and the fate of the more than 200 people on board is still unknown. A massive search and rescue is under way in waters off the coast of Malaysia and Vietnam where the plane presumably crashed. VOA's Bill Ide reports from Beijing that as the hours pass, there are more questions than answers about what happened.

Related video by Bill Ide

VOA News
Officials investigating the disappearance of a Malaysian airliner with 239 people on board say radar images show the missing jet may have inexplicably turned back before vanishing.

Malaysia's air force chief Rodzali Daud gave no further details on which direction the Boeing 777-200 flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing went or how far it veered off course before disappearing early Saturday.
 
He said military and civilian radar indicated the aircraft may have made a turn back.

Meanwhile, Reuters said that officials investigating the plane were narrowing the focus of their inquiries on the possibility that it disintegrated mid-flight.

Missing Malaysia Airlines planeMissing Malaysia Airlines plane
x
Missing Malaysia Airlines plane
Missing Malaysia Airlines plane
A massive international sea search has turned up no trace of the jet, though Vietnamese authorities said late Sunday a low-flying plane had spotted a rectangular object in waters about 90 kilometers south of Tho Chu island, the same area where oil slicks were spotted earlier.

State media speculated the object might be from the missing plane.

Also Sunday, Thai police said they were investigating a "passport ring" as details emerged of bookings for the flight made in Thailand with stolen European passports.

Two Europeans - Christian Kozel, an Austrian, and Luigi Maraldi of Italy - were listed on the passenger manifest of flight MH370, but neither man boarded the plane.

Both had their passports stolen in Thailand during the past two years. Malaysia has launched a terror probe investigating the suspect passengers and the United States has sent in the FBI to assist.

Malaysian Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said authorities are investigating the identities of two additional passengers who boarded the plane with suspicious papers.

Interpol said Sunday no country had checked the international police agency's database that held information about the stolen Austrian and Italian passports used to board the Malaysia Airlines flight.

The Malaysia Airlines flight disappeared from radar screens about an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing in good weather.  Most of the passengers were Chinese.

Air traffic controllers say they never received a distress calls before the jet disappeared.

The Boeing 777-200 is a very popular plane with an excellent safety record.

The most recent accident involving a Boeing 777 was the Asiana Airlines crash at San Francisco International Airport in July 2013. Three people were killed.  Pilot error is suspected in that incident.

You May Like

At Khmer Rouge Court, Long-Awaited Verdict Approaches

First phase of trial, which is coming to an end, has focused on forced exodus of Phnom Penh in 1975 - and now many are hopeful justice will be served More

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities More

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

Downing of Malaysian airliner, allegations of cross-border shelling move information war in war-torn country to a new level More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Lisa from: Texas
March 09, 2014 6:17 PM
What if the electronics went out and they couldn't radio? Is that even possible?

In Response

by: Okeloh from: Nairobi, Kenya
March 10, 2014 4:53 AM
@ I totally agree the system can fail but with a such state-of-the-art aircraft the SOS automatically activates with the signal easily picked by the nearest gadget..and I suppose the nearest 50 miles Island or Satellites hovering would detect that!!! Could it be sabotage??? Just wondering!!


by: Okeloh from: Nairobi, Kenya
March 09, 2014 2:56 PM
@ Frank...I also smell a rat for how can a Pilot make a turn-back without radioeing the Controls; who inteferred with the frequencies. Hope we will get some survivors to tell the true story.


by: Frank from: Louisiana
March 09, 2014 12:27 PM
Why would the pilot turn back without radioing? This just keeps getting more and more suspicious....

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
July 31, 2014 8:13 PM
The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict in Gaza, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities. Probably the most important destination is the local bakery. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Gaza City.
Video

Video US-Funded Program Offers Honduran Children Alternative to Illegal Immigration

President Obama and Central American leaders recently agreed to come up with a plan to address poverty and crime in the region that is fueling the surge of young migrants trying to illegally enter the United States. VOA’s Brian Padden looks at one such program in Honduras - funded in part by the United States - which gives street kids not only food and safety but a chance for a better life without, crossing the border.
Video

Video 'Fab Lab' Igniting Revolution in Kenya

The University of Nairobi’s Science and Technology Park is banking on 3-D prototyping to spark a manufacturing revolution in the country. Lenny Ruvaga has more for from Nairobi's so-called “FabLab” for VOA.
Video

Video Gazans in Shelled School Sought Shelter

Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
Video

Video Rapid Spread of Ebola in West Africa Prompts Global Alert

Across West Africa, health officials are struggling to keep up with what the World Health Organization describes as the worst ebola outbreak on record. The virus has killed hundreds of people this year. U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders are watching the developments closely as they weigh what actions, if any, are needed to help contain the disease.
Video

Video Michelle Obama: Young Africans Need to Embrace Women's Rights

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama urged some of Africa's best and brightest to advocate for women's rights in their home countries. As VOA's Pam Dockins explains, Obama spoke to some 500 participants of the Young African Leaders Initiative, a six-week U.S.-based training and development program.
Video

Video Immigrant Influx on Texas Border Heats Up Political Debate

Immigrants from Central America continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in south Texas, seeking asylum in the United States, as officials grapple with ways to deal with the problem and provide shelter for thousands of minors among the illegal border crossers. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports from Houston, the issue is complicated by internal U.S. politics and U.S. relations with the troubled nations that immigrants are fleeing.
Video

Video Study: Latino Students Most Segregated in California

Even though legal school segregation ended in the United States 60 years ago, one study finds segregation still occurs in the U.S. based on income and race. The University of California Los Angeles Civil Rights Project finds that students in California are more segregated by race than ever before, especially Latinos. Elizabeth Lee reports for VOA from Los Angeles.

AppleAndroid