News / Health

More Americans Turn to ER for Dental Care

The Interfaith Dental Clinic, a medical charity outside Nashville, Tennessee, offers dental care to those who can't afford dental insurance. (Photo courtesy Interfaith Dental Clinic)
The Interfaith Dental Clinic, a medical charity outside Nashville, Tennessee, offers dental care to those who can't afford dental insurance. (Photo courtesy Interfaith Dental Clinic)
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Mike Osborne
— Four-year-old Emily Bratcher is having a cavity filled.

And as uncomfortable as getting a tooth drilled might be, she’s lucky to be sitting in Rhonda Switzer's dentist chair at all.

Last year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranked Tennessee 47th among the 50 states for dental care. The CDC says the number of Tennessee residents visiting a dentist routinely is on the decline.

Working but poor families like Emily’s have the hardest time accessing dental care. They make too much money to qualify for government aid, but too little to pay for the care at market rates.

So Emily and her sister are being treated at the Interfaith Dental Clinic, a medical charity operated by a faith-based ministry. It can be especially important for people struggling to find or keep a job to have good oral health.

“Unfortunately, our society looks at people’s weight, their dialect, and their teeth in making decisions like, is that person educated or employable,” Executive Director Rhonda Switzer said.

And just as unfortunately, the problem is only getting worse. The Pew Research Center released a study earlier this year that indicates the U.S. has a severe shortage of dentists.

More than half of those currently in practice are nearing retirement. Even more alarming, a growing number of Americans are showing up at hospital emergency rooms looking for dental care.

“This is the 'canary in the coal mine.' This is the symptom that tells you we have a broken dental delivery system,” said Shelly Gehshan, director of the Pew Children’s Dental Campaign. “We don’t have enough dentists. We don’t have enough clinics. We don’t have enough dental insurance. We don’t have enough financing in the system. We don’t have enough prevention. It’s a neglected area.”

Gehshan says the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare reform initiative, will, in theory, extend dental coverage to every child in the nation, but she says the poorest of those children may still have trouble accessing care.

“They need help with transportation, or translation, or child care, and most dental care is provided by private dentists and they’re not set up to provide those extra services,” she said.

Gehshan says non-profit clinics like Switzer’s facility are better equipped to address those needs, but charitable operations are rare. She says one possible solution some states are exploring is introducing what she calls “mid-level” dental practitioners. Currently, only fully accredited doctors are allowed to practice dentistry in the U.S.

“In other countries there are other more different types of providers. So they have dental hygienists with extra training, or dental therapists, or people with both types of training," Gehshan said.

Little Emily Bratcher’s mother, Deborah, is not really interested in the politics of health care. She just wants her daughters to see a dentist regularly, and she’s a little angry it is not happening now.

“It’s just upsetting, because I don’t want my children to go through life having bad teeth, because I can’t afford $3,000 for dental work every other month or something,” Deborah Bratcher said.

The Pew Center’s Shelly Gehshan notes that the Affordable Care Act does not mandate dental coverage for adults, meaning millions of Americans will continue to struggle to maintain good oral health.

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Comments
     
by: Dr. H.R. Blake from: Chicago
September 10, 2013 7:12 PM
The Globalists chemical weapon of choice=FLUORIDE.
Clinically proven by Universities Oxford, Texas, and Harvard to cause bone cancer, autism, downs syndrome and a plethora of other cognitive disorders.


by: Dr. Connett from: USA
September 10, 2013 7:07 PM
There are very good reasons for not putting fluoride in the water supplies. It is a drug. If you wanted some to ingest, you’d have to get a prescription. And there are good reasons for why we don’t purposely add any other drugs to our water.

As Dr. Connett says:

“We don’t use the public water supply to deliver medicine because it’s a stupid thing to do. You can’t control the dose. You can’t control who gets it. [There's] no individual supervision. Of course it violates the individual’s right to informed consent to medicine.

So, first of all, you start by saying this is a crazy thing to do, for most people. Then you say, what are the dangers? I spent 15 years pursuing the dangers, but then I woke up one day and said, if it doesn’t work anyway; why would we takeany risk at all? Why would we lower a kid’s IQ by even a small few number of IQ points? Why would we run the risk of making our bones more brittle when we get old? Why would we run the risk of arthritis? Why would we run the risk of lowering thyroid function?

Why is it that the governments that fluoridate don’t investigate any of the things that I have just listed, and yet spend most of their time attacking the methodology of the studies that have found harm in India and China and elsewhere? [The loss of credibility is], I think, the most rational explanation that I have come up with.”


by: Dr. Kusenich from: USA
September 10, 2013 6:53 PM
FLUORIDE:THERE IS POISON IN THE TAP WATER!

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