News / Africa

Egyptian Protesters, Police Clash in Cairo

Protesters throw stones at security forces inside the presidential palace during clashes in front of the palace in Cairo, Egypt, February 1, 2013.
Protesters throw stones at security forces inside the presidential palace during clashes in front of the palace in Cairo, Egypt, February 1, 2013.
Edward Yeranian
Anti-government demonstrators clashed with security forces facing Egypt's presidential palace Friday evening, throwing gasoline bombs as police responded with tear gas and water cannons.

Huge balls of fire were seen on the sides of palace as smoke billowed over the streets.  President Mohamed  Morsi said in a statement that security forces would "act with utmost decisiveness" to protect the palace and other state buildings.

Opposition protests had grown larger by late afternoon in Cairo as groups of demonstrators gathered in Tahrir Square and near the palace. Cold weather and intermittent rain may have discouraged many people from turning out earlier, but by nightfall, crowds swelled.
 
Arab media reported that Egyptian Army troops were stationed at the entrances of Cairo to maintain security. A heavy security detail was near the presidential palace.


  • Protesters throw fireworks at police during clashes in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Anti-government protesters gather outside Egypt's presidential palace in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Police burn tents of protesters who staged a sit-in for weeks in front of the presidential palace, during clashes between protesters and police, in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Protesters throw stones at security forces inside the presidential palace during clashes in front of the palace in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptians shout slogans during anti-President Mohamed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • An Egyptian protester tries to escape from fire after he burned an anti-Morsi banner in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptian security forces protect themselves from heavy rains in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Protesters chant slogans and hold a picture of a slain young man in Port Said, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptian Army soldiers (C) try to stop protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi from attacking the Security Directorate of Port Said, during a protest in Port Said Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptian protesters chant anti-government slogans during a rally in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.

Port Said protests

At the mouth of the Suez Canal in Port Said, thousands of protesters chanted slogans against the government, following Friday prayers. The protest coincided with the first anniversary of a bloody soccer stampede at Port Said's main stadium.

Tensions have been running high in the city since a court decision last Saturday convicting 21 people to death after finding them responsible for the tragedy. Many Port Said residents complain that the convictions were arbitrary and that the judiciary convicted the men to appease rival soccer fans from Cairo.

News reports on Friday said that a large crowd gathered outside the government's provincial headquarters but did not attempt to storm the building. Police and army troops were stationed at different points surrounding the government complex.

Many top political leaders signed an agreement Thursday renouncing the violence, following a national dialogue meeting with Egyptian Islamic scholar Sheik Ahmed al-Tayeb.
Dialogue doubtful

Leftist political leader Hamdeen Sebahi said he had agreed to renounce violence but "not to give up on the revolution."

Said Sadek, who teaches political sociology at the American University in Cairo, said that the government did not respect a previous agreement over the constitution, making the likelihood of a compromise doubtful.

"National dialogue in Egypt is a dialogue of the deaf because we will not reach a compromise," he said.

Sadek said that the "real trouble in Egypt is formulating a fair and equitable political system." Political tensions, he predicts, will continue "because the objectives of the revolution have not been realized."

The unrest began on January 24 in Cairo on the eve of the second anniversary of the 2011 revolution and has spread to several cities.

Protesters accuse the Muslim Brotherhood, which dominates Morsi's government, of attempting to monopolize power two years after the revolution.

You May Like

Video Obama Announces Plan to Send 3,000 Troops to Liberia in Ebola Fight

At US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Obama details troop deployment and other pieces of US plan More

Video China Muslims Work to Change Perceptions After Knife Attacks

Muslims in Kunming say that they condemn the violence, it is not a reflection of the true beliefs of their faith More

Humanitarian Aid, Equipment Blocked in Cameroon

Move is seen as a developing supply crisis in West Africa More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: ali baba from: new york
February 01, 2013 8:52 PM
the violence news about Egypt is not going to stop. Mubarak was able to contain Egypt problem but moersi make it worst because his Islamic radical view and psychopath imam . one want to kill protesters . this is double standard. Mubarak sent to jail because he was accused of killing protesters . now imam produce fatwa to kill protesters and no body object about his fatwa. it is indicated that protesters are going to destroy the country and Islam allow to kill them. president moersi has not object

by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
February 01, 2013 10:33 AM
Morsi and Mubarack are both dictators. The only difference between them was that Mubarack provided religious freedom where as Morsi impliments so called sharia law of the 7th century and restricts the freedom of religion. Morsi killed more civilians during protests than Mubarack to retain power. Morsi should be subjected to the laws that put Mubarack in prison.
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
February 01, 2013 8:57 PM
even he was elected, his poor management and constitution he imposed to the Egyptian indicate that he is a bad news
In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
February 01, 2013 1:49 PM
@Davis K. Thanjan from: New York, how dare you say that Morsi is a dictator? Dont you know he is legally elected by majority Egyptians?
Just because you dont like him doesnt give you the right to claim he is a dictator.
Shame!

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Enviropreneur Seeks to Save the Environment, Empower the Communityi
X
September 16, 2014 2:06 PM
Lorna Rutto, a former banker, is now an ‘enviropreneur’ - turning plastic waste into furniture and fences discusses the challenges she faces in Africa with raw materials and the environment.
Video

Video Enviropreneur Seeks to Save the Environment, Empower the Community

Lorna Rutto, a former banker, is now an ‘enviropreneur’ - turning plastic waste into furniture and fences discusses the challenges she faces in Africa with raw materials and the environment.
Video

Video West Trades Accusations Over Ransoms

As world leaders try to forge a common response to the threat posed by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, there is simmering tension over differing policies on paying ransoms. In the past month, the jihadist group has beheaded two Americans and one Briton. Both countries refuse to pay ransom money. As Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London, there is uncertainty in the approach of some other European nations.
Video

Video Scotland Independence Bid Stokes Global Interest

The people of Scotland are preparing to vote on whether to become independent and break away from the rest of Britain, in a referendum being watched carefully in many other countries. Some see it as a risky experiment; while others hope a successful vote for independence might energize their own separatist demands. Foreign immigrants to Scotland have a front row seat for the vote. VOA’s Henry Ridgwell spoke to some of them in Edinburgh.
Video

Video Washington DC Mural Artists Help Beautify City

Like many cities, Washington has a graffiti problem. Buildings and homes, especially in low-income neighborhoods, are often targets of illegal artwork. But as we hear from VOA’s Julie Taboh, officials in the nation's capital have come up with an innovative program that uses the talents of local artists to beautify the city.
Video

Video US Muslim Leaders Condemn Islamic State

Leaders of America's Muslim community are condemning the violent extremism of the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. Muslim leaders say militants are exploiting their faith in a failed effort to justify violent extremism. VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports.
Video

Video Americans' Reaction Mixed on Obama Strategy for Islamic State Militants

President Barack Obama’s televised speech on how the United States plans to “degrade and destroy” the group known as the Islamic State reached a prime-time audience of millions. And it came as Americans appear more willing to embrace a bolder, tougher approach to foreign policy. VOA producer Katherine Gypson and reporter Jeff Seldin have this report from Washington.
Video

Video Authorities Allege LA Fashion Industry-Cartel Ties

U.S. officials say they have broken up crime rings that funneled tens of millions of dollars from Mexican drug cartels through fashion businesses in Los Angeles. Mike O'Sullivan reports that authorities announced nine arrests, as 1,000 law enforcement agents fanned out through the city on Wednesday.
Video

Video Bedouin Woman Runs Successful Business in Palestinian City

A Bedouin woman is breaking social taboos by running a successful vacation resort in the Palestinian town of Jericho. Bedouins are a sub-group of Arabs known for their semi-nomadic lifestyle. Zlatica Hoke says the resort in the West Bank's Jordan Valley is a model of success for women in the region.


Carnage and mayhem are part of daily life in northern Nigeria, the result of a terror campaign by the Islamist group Boko Haram. Fears are growing that Nigeria’s government may not know how to counter it, and may be making things worse. More

AppleAndroid