News / Africa

Egyptian Protesters, Police Clash in Cairo

Protesters throw stones at security forces inside the presidential palace during clashes in front of the palace in Cairo, Egypt, February 1, 2013.
Protesters throw stones at security forces inside the presidential palace during clashes in front of the palace in Cairo, Egypt, February 1, 2013.
Edward Yeranian
Anti-government demonstrators clashed with security forces facing Egypt's presidential palace Friday evening, throwing gasoline bombs as police responded with tear gas and water cannons.

Huge balls of fire were seen on the sides of palace as smoke billowed over the streets.  President Mohamed  Morsi said in a statement that security forces would "act with utmost decisiveness" to protect the palace and other state buildings.

Opposition protests had grown larger by late afternoon in Cairo as groups of demonstrators gathered in Tahrir Square and near the palace. Cold weather and intermittent rain may have discouraged many people from turning out earlier, but by nightfall, crowds swelled.
 
Arab media reported that Egyptian Army troops were stationed at the entrances of Cairo to maintain security. A heavy security detail was near the presidential palace.


  • Protesters throw fireworks at police during clashes in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Anti-government protesters gather outside Egypt's presidential palace in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Police burn tents of protesters who staged a sit-in for weeks in front of the presidential palace, during clashes between protesters and police, in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Protesters throw stones at security forces inside the presidential palace during clashes in front of the palace in Cairo, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptians shout slogans during anti-President Mohamed Morsi protest in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • An Egyptian protester tries to escape from fire after he burned an anti-Morsi banner in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptian security forces protect themselves from heavy rains in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Protesters chant slogans and hold a picture of a slain young man in Port Said, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptian Army soldiers (C) try to stop protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi from attacking the Security Directorate of Port Said, during a protest in Port Said Feb. 1, 2013.
  • Egyptian protesters chant anti-government slogans during a rally in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 1, 2013.

Port Said protests

At the mouth of the Suez Canal in Port Said, thousands of protesters chanted slogans against the government, following Friday prayers. The protest coincided with the first anniversary of a bloody soccer stampede at Port Said's main stadium.

Tensions have been running high in the city since a court decision last Saturday convicting 21 people to death after finding them responsible for the tragedy. Many Port Said residents complain that the convictions were arbitrary and that the judiciary convicted the men to appease rival soccer fans from Cairo.

News reports on Friday said that a large crowd gathered outside the government's provincial headquarters but did not attempt to storm the building. Police and army troops were stationed at different points surrounding the government complex.

Many top political leaders signed an agreement Thursday renouncing the violence, following a national dialogue meeting with Egyptian Islamic scholar Sheik Ahmed al-Tayeb.
Dialogue doubtful

Leftist political leader Hamdeen Sebahi said he had agreed to renounce violence but "not to give up on the revolution."

Said Sadek, who teaches political sociology at the American University in Cairo, said that the government did not respect a previous agreement over the constitution, making the likelihood of a compromise doubtful.

"National dialogue in Egypt is a dialogue of the deaf because we will not reach a compromise," he said.

Sadek said that the "real trouble in Egypt is formulating a fair and equitable political system." Political tensions, he predicts, will continue "because the objectives of the revolution have not been realized."

The unrest began on January 24 in Cairo on the eve of the second anniversary of the 2011 revolution and has spread to several cities.

Protesters accuse the Muslim Brotherhood, which dominates Morsi's government, of attempting to monopolize power two years after the revolution.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: ali baba from: new york
February 01, 2013 8:52 PM
the violence news about Egypt is not going to stop. Mubarak was able to contain Egypt problem but moersi make it worst because his Islamic radical view and psychopath imam . one want to kill protesters . this is double standard. Mubarak sent to jail because he was accused of killing protesters . now imam produce fatwa to kill protesters and no body object about his fatwa. it is indicated that protesters are going to destroy the country and Islam allow to kill them. president moersi has not object


by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
February 01, 2013 10:33 AM
Morsi and Mubarack are both dictators. The only difference between them was that Mubarack provided religious freedom where as Morsi impliments so called sharia law of the 7th century and restricts the freedom of religion. Morsi killed more civilians during protests than Mubarack to retain power. Morsi should be subjected to the laws that put Mubarack in prison.

In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
February 01, 2013 8:57 PM
even he was elected, his poor management and constitution he imposed to the Egyptian indicate that he is a bad news

In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
February 01, 2013 1:49 PM
@Davis K. Thanjan from: New York, how dare you say that Morsi is a dictator? Dont you know he is legally elected by majority Egyptians?
Just because you dont like him doesnt give you the right to claim he is a dictator.
Shame!

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