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Motive Unclear in Deadly Los Angeles Airport Shooting

Authorities are working to find a motive for Friday's shooting at Los Angeles International Airport that killed a federal security agent and wounded at least two other officers.

Officials say the man who opened fire at the airport with a semi-automatic rifle was carrying a note saying he wanted to kill members of the Transportation Security Administration. They say the note indicated he had no interest in hurting "innocent people."

Police say the gunman shot his way past an airport security checkpoint before being wounded in a gunfight with authorities and apprehended. Witnesses say the suspect did not fire at people who said they were not TSA employees.

Officials say the gunman had sent a text to a sibling suggesting he was prepared to die.

Evidence indicates the gunman acted alone. Authorities have not ruled out terrorism as a motive.

The gunman is identified as 23-year-old Los Angeles resident Paul Ciancia. Several other people were shot and wounded in the incident.



The slain employee was the first TSA officer killed in the line of duty in the 12-year history of the agency. The TSA, which screens airline passengers, was founded in response to the 9/11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States.

Friday's shooting sparked chaos at one of the world's busiest airports, with many frightened travelers scrambling for cover as shots rang out.

Police surrounded the facility as the incident unfolded and evacuated one terminal. Officials stopped flights bound for Los Angeles International Airport from taking off at other airports, causing long delays in several parts of the country.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti praised authorities for quickly apprehending the attacker. He said the shooting could have been much worse, noting that more than 100 rounds of ammunition were found in Ciancia's possession.

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