News / Asia

Mumbai Attack Suspect Confirms State Support, India Says

A man pays homage in front of portraits of police officers killed in the Mumbai terror attacks outside the Taj Mahal Palace hotel on Nov. 26, 2010, the second anniversary of the attacks.A man pays homage in front of portraits of police officers killed in the Mumbai terror attacks outside the Taj Mahal Palace hotel on Nov. 26, 2010, the second anniversary of the attacks.
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A man pays homage in front of portraits of police officers killed in the Mumbai terror attacks outside the Taj Mahal Palace hotel on Nov. 26, 2010, the second anniversary of the attacks.
A man pays homage in front of portraits of police officers killed in the Mumbai terror attacks outside the Taj Mahal Palace hotel on Nov. 26, 2010, the second anniversary of the attacks.
VOA News
Indian officials say a man arrested last week on suspicion of helping plan the 2008 Mumbai attacks has confirmed there was "state support" in the deadly assault.

While he did not name any country, India's Home Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram told reporters Wednesday that the interrogation of Indian-born Sayed Zabiuddin, who goes by the name Abu Hamza, invalidates the argument that non-state actors were behind the attack.  India has repeatedly accused Pakistan of backing in some way the Mumbai attack, which killed 166 people and paralyzed the country's financial capital.

Responding Wednesday, Pakistan's advisor on Interior Affairs Rehman Malik dismissed any Pakistani connection as Indian "propaganda" and encouraged New Delhi to share any information it has about Hamza so Islamabad can take action.  

Indian authorities detained Hamza on June 21 after he arrived in India from the Middle East.  Hamza is an alleged member of Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Pakistan-based militant group blamed for the attacks in India's financial hub.

Officials say he was based in Pakistan at the time of the attack on Mumbai and issued instructions by telephone to the 10 gunmen who conducted the assault on luxury hotels, a Jewish center, and a busy train station in Mumbai in November of 2008.

Nine of the attackers were killed.  A Mumbai court sentenced the lone surviving gunman to death for crimes including murder, waging war against India and terrorism.

India has resumed the peace process with Pakistan after suspending the dialogue following the attacks.

The Press Trust of India describes Hamza as a 30-year-old Indian, originally from Maharashtra state. The news agency says Indian security agencies had interrogated detained terrorists about Hamza and learned he operated out of "terror camps" in Karachi and Pakistani-controlled Kashmir.

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by: Owen Shok from: Mummy-bye
June 27, 2012 7:40 PM
Mumbai Attack Suspect Confirms State Support, India Says
And this is NEWS????!!!
What a shock...


by: kanaikaal irumporai from: Norway
June 27, 2012 6:56 PM
Mr. Palaniappan Chidambaram is known for his fabulous lies and fary-tales!, so are the spy-agencies of India, RAW, IB etc.. Congress regime needs backing for it's presidential candidate, so they'll tell anything to their public. At the end of the day, what matters is how transparently the intoregation(toture) and trial are conducted, for in India custodial deaths and confession under duress are unusually common, ranging from petty cases in local police statins to cases of national important. If the accused is known to Swami -hindu tantric practitioner with political connections-, then he will certainly comeout clean, while some innocents endup in death row.


by: wonderwhy from: Maryland
June 27, 2012 2:45 PM
It is not surprising that Pakistan is a rogue country that dabbles in terrorism as state policy. The question is what is India going to do about it. Other than making pompous statements or crying to the press the Indian nation has ZERO options. For that matter, we Americans have only a few other options such as drone strikes. India cannot even defend itself. What a pathetic soft country. Its almost comical to watch the Indian government make these statements. If you ever watched the move BULLY, you will know how these victims(India) who are crying about a bully who beats them (Pakistan) goes and com pains to the school administrators (USA) and the administrator asks the victims if they tried to be nice and understanding of the bully. What a Joke!!!!

In Response

by: craigd from: Illinoise
June 28, 2012 1:00 AM
RE: wonderwhy -- Actually, India is spending much more on it military than Pakistan. India has expanded its navy with modern submarines. It has more tanks, fighter jets, and soldiers than Pakistan. Their army is very well trained. In the military conflicts with Pakistan, India has never lost. So, where do you get the idea that India is weak? You seem to confuse bluster and pomposity with military might. India has shown remarkable wisdom and restraint dealing with Pakistan. Going to war is not in India's interest. Furthermore, India is building a multi-cultural nation with 150 million muslims. So, India does not want to fan the flames of domestic violence.

Personally, from watching India, I have come to admire and respect their foreign policy. I have wished for a long time that the US would work more closely with India to promote democracy in South Asia.

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