News / Africa

Murdered Nigerian Cleric Preached 'Peace'

Borno State Governor Kashim Shettima visits injured victims receiving treatment at a hospital following an attack in Kawuri on January 28, 2014.
Borno State Governor Kashim Shettima visits injured victims receiving treatment at a hospital following an attack in Kawuri on January 28, 2014.
Heather Murdock
It has been a bloody seven days in northern Nigeria, where a pastor and a prominent sheik were murdered over the weekend, just days after scores of people were killed in separate attacks in Borno and Adamawa states.  Militants are targeting clerics for speaking out against extremism, according to accounts by local residents.

Last week, after the Nigerian military announced it would quickly end Nigeria’s more than four-year-old insurgency, the bloodshed got worse.  Militants stormed a town, bombed a church and bombed a bus.  
 
Then, on Friday, a pastor was killed in Adamawa, one of three Nigerian states under emergency rule.  Saturday night, Sheik Adam Albani’s car was fired on in Zaria, a city in Kaduna state where hideouts of Islamist militant group Boko Haram have been discovered.  The attack killed the sheik, his wife and their child who was in her lap.
 
Godwin Adie, an Abuja real estate broker his neighbors call “The Pastor,” says the murdered sheik was known for preaching against extremism in an area where extremists are likely to recruit. (H. Murdock/VOA)Godwin Adie, an Abuja real estate broker his neighbors call “The Pastor,” says the murdered sheik was known for preaching against extremism in an area where extremists are likely to recruit. (H. Murdock/VOA)
x
Godwin Adie, an Abuja real estate broker his neighbors call “The Pastor,” says the murdered sheik was known for preaching against extremism in an area where extremists are likely to recruit. (H. Murdock/VOA)
Godwin Adie, an Abuja real estate broker his neighbors call “The Pastor,” says the murdered sheik was known for preaching against extremism in an area where extremists are likely to recruit. (H. Murdock/VOA)
On a quiet street in the Nigerian capital, Godwin Adie, a real estate broker neighbors call “The Pastor,” says Albani was known for preaching against extremism in an area where extremists are likely to recruit.

“I think what you’ll discover is that among all these religious leaders, he’s one of them that preached peace," Adie said. "I think because he was an advocate of his preaching peace, that’s why they slaughtered him, and killed him and his family.”

Boko Haram militants are blamed for thousands of deaths in the past four and a half years in attacks on churches, mosques, schools, media houses, security forces and government institutions.  
 
Khalid Aliyu Abubakar is the secretary-general of Jama'atu Nasril Islam, an Islamic umbrella organization in northern Nigeria.  Speaking to VOA on his way to Zaria to attend the Sheik Albani's funeral and meet with other religious leaders, he notes that the murders have been blamed on Boko Haram, but no one has taken responsibility for the attacks.

“The greatest challenge now falls to the security agencies of this country to investigate, to dig out, to find out, and tell us," said Abubakar.
 
But, he adds, Albani was well known for being a strong advocate of education, a tense subject in northern Nigeria. Boko Haram means ‘Western education in sinful’ in the local Hausa language and militants have burned schools, killed students and threatened to kill all teachers.
 
In the past eight and half months, the Nigerian military has pushed insurgents out of many urban centers in the three states under emergency rule.  But attacks continue in the countryside. Areas like Zaria, which is not under emergency rule, need more protection, Abubakar said.

“Security findings show some volatility, the erupting of violence or conflict, or murder.”
 
Others argue that peace talks are the only way to stop the killings.  
 
On the Abuja street, Adie, the real estate broker, argues another commonly-held theory on how to end the violence.  He says rich politicians and elites pay for the insurgency.  If those funds are cut off, the impoverished young men and boys that do most of the fighting will all go home.

You May Like

Video Obama Announces Plan to Send 3,000 Troops to Liberia in Ebola Fight

At US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Obama details troop deployment and other pieces of US plan More

Video China Muslims Work to Change Perceptions After Knife Attacks

Muslims in Kunming say that they condemn the violence, it is not a reflection of the true beliefs of their faith More

Humanitarian Aid, Equipment Blocked in Cameroon

Move is seen as a developing supply crisis in West Africa More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Godwin from: Nigeria
February 03, 2014 12:49 PM
Does anyone need boko haram to claim what they have done before we know that they have done it? What I understand the man waiting for a claim to be made before apportioning blame to boko haram means is that though boko haram has become name of a group, almost all of the Muslim leaders in the country have leaning and sympathy to their course, and can, with or without their operatives, carry out same terror anywhere. Again we go into a usual terrain - the politicians and bigwigs of the religion are behind it.

The authorities that be - federal, state and local governments in the country, legislators, ministers, governors/deputies, commissioners, senior retired and serving military and civilian officers etc. - know the truth, as well are/know the individuals either doing it personally or sponsoring it, yet they beat about the bush. Who polices the police? That is an intractable question in Nigeria and Africa.

The Nigerian politician is more police than the police. They fix their own salaries and decide everything in the country, who dares say reduce their take home pay! They would rather share the national treasury than reduce their take. And with the excessive income, why not? They can pay their tithe to their religion by contributing to the jihad and its spread through boko haram. God help Nigeria. Nigeria we hail thee. The labor of our heroes past shall never be in vain.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Enviropreneur Seeks to Save the Environment, Empower the Communityi
X
September 16, 2014 2:06 PM
Lorna Rutto, a former banker, is now an ‘enviropreneur’ - turning plastic waste into furniture and fences discusses the challenges she faces in Africa with raw materials and the environment.
Video

Video Enviropreneur Seeks to Save the Environment, Empower the Community

Lorna Rutto, a former banker, is now an ‘enviropreneur’ - turning plastic waste into furniture and fences discusses the challenges she faces in Africa with raw materials and the environment.
Video

Video West Trades Accusations Over Ransoms

As world leaders try to forge a common response to the threat posed by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, there is simmering tension over differing policies on paying ransoms. In the past month, the jihadist group has beheaded two Americans and one Briton. Both countries refuse to pay ransom money. As Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London, there is uncertainty in the approach of some other European nations.
Video

Video Scotland Independence Bid Stokes Global Interest

The people of Scotland are preparing to vote on whether to become independent and break away from the rest of Britain, in a referendum being watched carefully in many other countries. Some see it as a risky experiment; while others hope a successful vote for independence might energize their own separatist demands. Foreign immigrants to Scotland have a front row seat for the vote. VOA’s Henry Ridgwell spoke to some of them in Edinburgh.
Video

Video Washington DC Mural Artists Help Beautify City

Like many cities, Washington has a graffiti problem. Buildings and homes, especially in low-income neighborhoods, are often targets of illegal artwork. But as we hear from VOA’s Julie Taboh, officials in the nation's capital have come up with an innovative program that uses the talents of local artists to beautify the city.
Video

Video US Muslim Leaders Condemn Islamic State

Leaders of America's Muslim community are condemning the violent extremism of the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. Muslim leaders say militants are exploiting their faith in a failed effort to justify violent extremism. VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports.
Video

Video Americans' Reaction Mixed on Obama Strategy for Islamic State Militants

President Barack Obama’s televised speech on how the United States plans to “degrade and destroy” the group known as the Islamic State reached a prime-time audience of millions. And it came as Americans appear more willing to embrace a bolder, tougher approach to foreign policy. VOA producer Katherine Gypson and reporter Jeff Seldin have this report from Washington.
Video

Video Authorities Allege LA Fashion Industry-Cartel Ties

U.S. officials say they have broken up crime rings that funneled tens of millions of dollars from Mexican drug cartels through fashion businesses in Los Angeles. Mike O'Sullivan reports that authorities announced nine arrests, as 1,000 law enforcement agents fanned out through the city on Wednesday.
Video

Video Bedouin Woman Runs Successful Business in Palestinian City

A Bedouin woman is breaking social taboos by running a successful vacation resort in the Palestinian town of Jericho. Bedouins are a sub-group of Arabs known for their semi-nomadic lifestyle. Zlatica Hoke says the resort in the West Bank's Jordan Valley is a model of success for women in the region.


Carnage and mayhem are part of daily life in northern Nigeria, the result of a terror campaign by the Islamist group Boko Haram. Fears are growing that Nigeria’s government may not know how to counter it, and may be making things worse. More

AppleAndroid