News / Asia

Musharraf: Pakistan Can Play 'Critical Role' in Stabilizing Afghanistan

The former President of Pakistan, Pervez Musharraf, speaks at a news conference at a branch of his political party in east London January 19, 2012.
The former President of Pakistan, Pervez Musharraf, speaks at a news conference at a branch of his political party in east London January 19, 2012.
VOA News
Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf tells VOA that his country can play a "critical role" in whatever initiative is taken toward stabilizing Afghanistan.

Speaking to VOA's Ashna Radio in Washington Tuesday, Musharraf added that it will be "unfortunate" for the region and Afghanistan if Pakistan is ignored in the process.

His comments come as Afghanistan's top military officials are meeting with their Pakistani counterparts in Islamabad for discussions on mutual defense issues.

One possible item on the agenda is Pakistan's training of Afghan security forces. Musharraf said that since before the terror attacks on the United States in 2001, he has been telling the Afghan government to send its "military, diplomats [and] security persons" to Pakistan for free training - something he said Kabul has never done.

Speaking to VOA's Afghan Service on Tuesday, Afghanistan's ambassador to Pakistan, Mohammad Omar Daudzai, acknowledged Pakistan's past offers of training and said the visiting Afghan delegation had discussed the issue of cooperation with Pakistani military officials.

He said an agreement had not yet been reached, though, and that his government does not expect one at the end of the Afghan military delegation's trip to Islamabad.

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by: abdulraufakhtar from: Islamabad
February 01, 2013 4:19 PM
I have read all five comments and non of them is true and look like a part of a drama and media bashing against pakistan , things are much better than american cities and crime rates much less than what is in new dehli .


by: GS5 from: USA
January 31, 2013 3:18 PM
How can anyone believe this guy who, when asked by NPR where Osama Bin Laden was, replied that wherever he may be, "HE IS DEFINITELY NOT IN PAKISTAN", and now we know that Bin Ladin was hiding in the shadow of the ISI in the army cantontment of Abbotabad, next to the Pakistani military academy! Therefore, Pervez Musharraf is either an idiot, who as ex chief of the ISI, the army & President, did not know what what was going on in his own backyard, or he is a liar. For a refugee from India who made it big in his new country of domicile, against all odds, I will give him that much credence that he is no fool. Which therefore means that he is a Liar, who is laughing all the way to the bank now, after making a fool of the entire western world, and still making money with his talks, and living in London and Dubai.


by: gambetta8888@gmail.com from: anywhere
January 31, 2013 12:44 PM
I think Musharraf wanted to say that Afghanistan can play critical role in stabilizing Pakistan but he knew saying that would have meant end of his political career! Actually, what he said was also right in the sense that if Pakistan stops interfering in the internal matters of Afghanistan, if Pakistan stop training terrorists on its soil and then sending them to Kabul to create chaos Afghanistan would indeed become stable. But then its not just about Afghanistan, their ugly foot prints can be found in the middle east, Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and now America too. More than Afghanistan, its Pakistan that needs to be stabilized.


by: LarAwBar from: Toronto, ON
January 31, 2013 10:18 AM
Why would Pakistan want peace in AFG, lets not forget who still doesn't recognize Pakistan as a nation in UN? No, not India, Afghanistan; who is claiming their Pashtun(Afghan) people and the land. We already know Pakistan's intentions, to destroy Afghan culture, history and its people on both sides of the unrecognized border. We already have India involved. So no thank you Pakistan! Or should I thank you guys for turning my country to Mars, sanctions, using it as a battlefield, stabilized OBL and al qaeda, their other face. Pakistan has 2 faces.


by: Z Z Top from: San Diego,Ca
January 31, 2013 8:43 AM
Pakistan politicians has been playing this game for a long time. Today Pakistan is the victim of fundamentalists itself and everyday inecent civilians are getting killed by their own suicide bombers. If Pakistan government specially ISI want to have peace in Afghanistan they should have convinced all these Taliban to join the peace process instad of blowing theirself and killing civilians and NATO forces who are helping Afghanistan for the past 12 years. Mr.Musharaf should start to stabalize their own Pakistan and then interfare in Afghanistan.


by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
January 31, 2013 12:15 AM
From a certain unrealistic perspective Mr. Musharraf is correct, in an utopian world, Pakistan should be playing a principal role in stabilizing the entire region; unfortunately for that to occur in the real world, Pakistan needs to be stable itself. Even in the main cities of Pakistan, like Karachi and Islamabad, the average citizen, when he leaves his home to go shopping for his and his family's essential daily rations, he does not know if he will be returning home. The average citizen has to gamble that the terrorists will not attack the market, that day.

If a girl leaves for school, the parents are in fear, she will not return, because the terrorist like shooting little girls.. So Mr. Musharraf needs to get real and start praying that Pakistan does not fall apart. And then there is the issue of the economy, which is not making much progress because of the lack of security,, and so on. Yes Pakistan should be setting an example for Afghanistan, but clearly it is not.

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