News / Middle East

    Egypt Protests Weaken Amid Crackdown

    Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans against the Egyptian Army during a march near Al Nour mosque in Abassia district in Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 23, 2013.
    Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans against the Egyptian Army during a march near Al Nour mosque in Abassia district in Cairo, Egypt, Aug. 23, 2013.
    Heather Murdock
    Muslim Brotherhood supporters are protesting Friday for the first time in days, despite reports that recent violence and the military crackdown on the leadership has crippled the organization. But the mass protests they called for have, so far, failed to materialize. 
     
    Protesters looked grim as they marched, shortly after Friday prayers. The men chanted “Get out Sissi!” referring to General Abdul Fatah al-Sissi, the army chief who is now essentially in charge of the government. 
     
    But the demonstration had no more than a couple hundred participants, as planned protests throughout Cairo showed little strength in numbers or intensity.
     
    Amnesty International said about 1,000 people have been killed in violence associated with protests organized by the Muslim Brotherhood since the military destroyed two major sit-in demonstrations last week.   
     
    Troops and police showed low-key security measures before the "Friday of Martyrs" processions that were to begin from 28 mosques in the capital after weekly prayers.
     
    But midday prayers were canceled at some mosques, and there were few signs of major demonstrations unfolding in Cairo.
     
    • Demonstrators hold up four fingers, a symbol of their solidarity with the the destroyed sit-in protest known as Rabaa, which means four or fourth in Arabic, Cairo, August 23, 2013. (H. Elrasam for VOA)
    • Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans against the military and the interior ministry as they gesture "Rabaa," Cairo, August 23, 2013.
    • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi hold posters showing victims of a military crackdown on their protest camp during a march in Cairo, August 23, 2013.
    • Egyptian army soldiers in armored vehicles block Tahrir Square in Cairo, August 23, 2013.
    • Protesters shout slogans against former president Hosni Mubarak's release from prison, in front of the courthouse and the Attorney General's office in downtown Cairo, August 23, 2013.
    • Egyptian medics escort former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak into an ambulance after he was flown by a helicopter to the Maadi Military Hospital from Torah prison, Cairo, August 22, 2013.
    • Supporters of deposed Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak gesture as the helicopter carrying him leaves Tora prison, Cairo, August 22, 2013.
    • A ripped poster of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi lies on the ground in the courtyard of the Rabaah Al-Adawiya mosque in Nasr city, Cairo, August 21, 2013.
    • An Egyptian man pushes a wheelbarrow with debris from inside the Rabaah Al-Adawiya mosque in Nasr city, Cairo, August 21, 2013.

    Journalist Sherif Elhelwa said the Muslim Brotherhood may have been weakened by the recent violence and the arrest of many of its leaders, but he vowed the organization will continue to stage demonstrations.
     
    “They are regrouping.  They are trying to reorganize," he said. "In the next couple of weeks we are going to see new faces.  The old faces are probably gone now having been cracked down upon, and they are imprisoned.  So I’m going to see the second line of Muslim brothers coming to the scene.”
     
    Elhelwa added that the protesters will continue to demand Morsi's re-instatement. He was ousted by the military on July 3.
     
    But Mohammad Hisham, a spokesperson for the Democratic Revolutionary Alliance that supports the army-lead interim government, said the crackdown is the only way to free Egypt from violence. He said the Brotherhood protesters need to be curbed as they often carry weapons.
     
    “They consider the struggle against these terrorist groups is closely related to the struggle for democracy and for achieving all other measures which are necessary for the interests of the poor people of Egypt,” he said.
      
    Muslim Brotherhood supporters responded that a small number of protesters may appear at rallies with weapons, but the group is committed to non-violence. 
     
    At the protest in Maadi in southern Cairo Friday, demonstrators marched slowly and calmly.  Many carried yellow signs showing a hand displaying four fingers. It's a symbol of enduring solidarity in memory of what happened last week at Rabaa, a protest camp destroyed by troops in a siege that left hundreds dead. Rabaa means “fourth” in Arabic.

    Related story by Al Pessin:

    Crackdown Affects Cairo Protestsi
    X
    August 23, 2013 7:26 PM
    The crackdown on dissent by Egypt's military-installed government appears to be having an impact on its opponents, as some protests planned for Friday did not happen and others were relatively small. Supporters of the military takeover hope that the faster stability is restored, the sooner democracy will follow, but that is not guaranteed. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Cairo.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    August 23, 2013 2:53 PM
    By violating orders and continuing to protest when they should be negotiating a return to full democracy in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood proves itself an outlaw and should be dealt with accordingly. For inciting more bloodshed as if the mayhem they unleashed on the country recently was not enough, the security forces should round up the rude protesters into a seclusion before they incite the masses into another lawlessness. The police should stand firm to do its duty to the country. Morsi has been rejected by the people and that is final. The most appalling part is that women are leading the trouble now instead of being the ones to call their men to order, because if they get killed or destroy the country, their children will go fatherless and without a future. Instead the women are strengthening the hand of terrorism and evil in the country. Too bad! Well, it behooves the army and the security operatives to stop them now before other terrorists join them to create further chaos in Egypt just recovering from the wounds inflicted by the Muslim Brotherhood.

    by: Anonymous
    August 23, 2013 1:55 PM
    that is exactly the answer against the MB... force... no reason or attempts at persuasion...
    In Response

    by: ALI baba from: new york
    August 23, 2013 4:41 PM
    you got that right. Muslim brotherhood understand the language of power . and they got it

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