News / Middle East

Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Claims Win in Egyptian Election

Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Claims Win, Egypt's Military Claims Powersi
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Elizabeth Arrott
June 18, 2012 8:00 PM
The Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi has claimed victory in Egypt's first post-uprising presidential race. But the rival camp of old guard candidate Ahmed Shafiq disputes the unofficial results, while the ruling military council has claimed sweeping powers, throwing this major test of the nation's transition into doubt. VOA's Elizabeth Arrott has more from Cairo.

Muslim Brotherhood's Morsi Claims Win, Egypt's Military Claims Powers

Elizabeth Arrott

CAIRO - The Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi has claimed victory in Egypt's first post-uprising presidential race. But the rival camp of old guard candidate Ahmed Shafiq disputes the unofficial results, while the ruling military council claimed sweeping powers, throwing this major test of the nation's transition into doubt.
Morsi's claim was just one in a stunning series of events in the turmoil that has attended Egypt's historic poll.

Just after the polls closed, the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces issued a constitutional declaration, granting itself legislative powers, control of the economy and the right to pick who will draft the next constitution.

With presidential powers still unclear and the Islamist-dominated lower parliament dissolved by court order Thursday, any victory Morsi might have when official results are announced later in the week would seem compromised from the start.
  • Egyptians show their inked fingers after casting their votes in Giza, Egypt.
  • A voter prepares to cast his vote at a polling station in Cairo.
  • Ballot counting began after polls closed in Cairo on Sunday.
  • Mohammed Morsi and his supporters celebrate his victory at his campaign headquarters in Cairo, June 18, 2012.
  • Celebrations broke out in Cairo's Tahrir square.
  • Workers uninstall a billboard showing presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq in Cairo.
  • A Morsi supporter celebrates his victory in Tahrir Square.
  • Morsi supporters celebrated in Tahrir square.
  • A bread seller in Tahrir square, making a victory sign.
Meanwhile, Shafiq's campaign asserted the former Air Force commander and last prime minister under the old government had a slight lead over Morsi.
At a news conference early Monday, Morsi called for calm. He said he is seeking stability and love in a civic, national democratic and modern state.

Egypt's Interim Constitution Declaration
 
  • Published by ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces on June 17
  • Amends the council's Constitutional Declaration of March 2011
  • Requires next president to take oath of office before the Supreme Constitutional Court because parliament is dissolved
  • Gives Supreme Council of the Armed Forces authority over all affairs of the military
  • Makes council chairman, Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, armed forces commander, defense minister
  • Gives military leaders power to appoint panel to draft new constitution
  • Postpones new parliamentary elections until new constitution is approved
  • Grants military leaders powers to initiate legislation until new parliament elected
He did not speak out against the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces latest moves. But his supporters, along with liberals, activists and some more conservative Islamists decried the SCAF's actions as a "coup."

The declaration also appeared to set out a timeframe for writing the constitution and holding new elections for parliament - raising the possibility that Egypt's state of limbo, now already 16 months, could continue until nearly the end of the year.

Voter turnout in the two-day runoff election was low, an apparent sign of little enthusiasm about the two choices, neither of which many voters said represents their vision for the country's future.

For many of the people who took part in the uprising, the choice was particularly grim, prompting some to boycott the vote or go to polls and nullify their ballots.

Cairo University professor Hassan Nafaa says the problem is the ruling military has shown little acknowledgement of the events early last year.

"The thing is whether you under recognize that there has been a big revolution in this country of not and what are the needs, what are the mistakes committed by the old regime?  If you draw these kinds of lessons and you try to redress the situation, maybe you will succeed. But they have a set of mind that is not capable of drawing the right lessons," said Nafaa.

The potential show-down between the two major forces of the past half-century - Egypt's military and the Muslim Brotherhood, have some concerned about a repeat of the Algerian civil war of the 1990s, after an Islamist victory at the polls was canceled.
Professor Nafaa believes the military, seen by many Egyptians as a guarantor of stability, would not engage in an armed conflict with its citizens.

"I don't think there will be a repetition of what happened in Algeria in Egypt. It is a different country and a different mentality and a different balance of forces," he said.

Nafaa does not rule out the possibility of some violence in the wake of the election, but believes the biggest fight will be the political power struggle.

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Comments
     
by: Scribe from: Montreal, Canada
June 18, 2012 6:58 PM
Oh yeah, that's all that we need to complete the Mid-East circle, an autocratic Egypt run by backwards, murderous, fundamentalist Muslims. Just wonderful. Why don't we all just live the way they did in the days of Mohammed and slaughter anyone considered an Infidel? What's the first order of Brotherhood business? Buying an Islamic bomb from Iran? Beheading profane Copts in the local soccer stadium? Filming videos of young woman having clitoridectomies? Like, seriously, this planet is going to hell in a handbasket - The lunatics are really taking over the asylums and we are the ones being straight-jacketed.

In Response

by: proud to be Muslim from: Egypt
June 20, 2012 4:34 PM
I think we don't interfere whether tour regime is religious or profane..and we don't even care..because we believe that every people has the freedom to decide his life..Firstly I don't understand why you insult Muslims as we don't even insult any one..We respect all people .....Secondly,who appointed you to defend the planet specially you are enjoying such depressive and poor mentality..


by: Hadenuf from: Eastside
June 18, 2012 6:36 PM
This ensures the birth of yet another member of the axis of evil who will milk the free western world for all it can and repay it with extremism in all forms. When will we just shut the doors on this lot and go about solving the problems on our own doorsteps.

In Response

by: Said from: Egypt
June 20, 2012 4:40 PM
mmmmmm well done my pal...You are right so do I think too.It is better to leave us alone and avoid being milked...thus we keep our OIL and treasures safe also from being milked by you.....Be yourselves and please don't interfere ..try to solve your own problems and don't export your hatred and extremism to us


by: Sid Harth from: DC
June 18, 2012 6:15 PM
Early morning, to a separate claim by Muslim Brotherhood that their man won the election, when all the counting, processing, checking and rechecking was not even started, I said:

"Uncle Sam Decides, not the Egyptian election Commission."

Mostly based upon my personal judgment and the past experience, I came out to be more accurate than the media reports.

The Military has made Muslim Brotherhood their mortal enemy. The same goes for the earlier Mubarak dictatorship. It is much safer to deal with an enemy (of democratic processes) you know than start worrying about the devil you know, fer shur, I go.

...and I am Sid Harth@webworldismyoyster.com


by: Roni Hachacham
June 18, 2012 12:02 PM
And what it is about Muslim Sisterhood's? Are they out of picture?

In Response

by: Proud to be Muslim from: Egypt
June 20, 2012 4:25 PM
There is no need to be a wise guy......But as you know o mayn't know ,the word "brother" can also include sister...I say my son when I mean my sons and daughters

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