News / Middle East

Muslim Brotherhood Curbs Draw Mixed Reaction

Muslim Brotherhood Curbs Draw Mixed Reactioni
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September 24, 2013
Egyptian reaction to a court order banning the activities of the Muslim Brotherhood has been mixed. VOA's Elizabeth Arrott has more on the nation's deeply divided political situation.
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Elizabeth Arrott
— Opponents of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood are reacting favorably to a ban on all activity by the Islamist group and the seizing of its assets.

“They made a lot of mistakes and this is the consequence of these mistakes," said Cairo resident Ahmed Tolba. "I support the decision and support the seizure.”

Monday's court decision is the latest turn in a stunning reversal for group.   

A man looks at bodies laid out in a make shift morgue after Egyptian security forces stormed two huge protest camps at the Rabaa al-Adawiya and Al-Nahda squares where supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi were camped, in Cairo, on August 14, 2013.A man looks at bodies laid out in a make shift morgue after Egyptian security forces stormed two huge protest camps at the Rabaa al-Adawiya and Al-Nahda squares where supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi were camped, in Cairo, on August 14, 2013.
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A man looks at bodies laid out in a make shift morgue after Egyptian security forces stormed two huge protest camps at the Rabaa al-Adawiya and Al-Nahda squares where supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi were camped, in Cairo, on August 14, 2013.
A man looks at bodies laid out in a make shift morgue after Egyptian security forces stormed two huge protest camps at the Rabaa al-Adawiya and Al-Nahda squares where supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi were camped, in Cairo, on August 14, 2013.
From the overthrow of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, a Muslim Brotherhood member, in early July, to the crackdown on supporters that left more than 1,000 dead and thousands more in custody or on the run, the brotherhood is enduring some of its darkest days since a previous ban in 1954.

And that's fine by some who believe the government's contention that the Islamist political group is closely allied, or in fact the same, as extremists carrying out attacks across the country.

“The group that sheds the blood of their fellow Egyptians or sheds the blood of anyone must become an illegitimate group and a terrorist group," said Cairo resident Sameh Samir. "They killed youths who were in their prime years in Sinai and took Egyptians' money and placed it in favor of their group.”

Key Dates in Egypt

  • February 11, 2011 - President Hosni Mubarak resigns after weeks of massive protests and clashes
  • January 21, 2012 - The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party wins almost half of Egypt's parliamentary seats
  • June 24, 2012 - Mohamed Morsi becomes Egypt's first freely elected president
  • November 22, 2012 - Morsi grants himself sweeping powers, sparking protests
  • July 3, 2013 - The army removes Morsi from power and suspends the constitution
Brotherhood leaders vow to appeal the court ruling, and supporters say they will continue their demonstrations, which have persisted despite a state of emergency throughout much of the country.

Rights activists also expressed dismay over what they fear may become an even greater polarization of the country.  

“We've moved into a phase where there seems to be an overall political decision to exclude the brotherhood from Egypt's political future," said Heba Morayef of Human Rights Watch. "And I think without some form of inclusion of the brotherhood, I don't see political stability occurring in Egypt's future.”

A spokeswoman for the U.S. State Department said Secretary of State John Kerry has discussed the matter with Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy.

"A transparent and inclusive political process that preserves the rights of all Egyptians to participate and leads back to a civilian-led government is critical to the success of Egypt's political and economic future," said Jen Psaki.

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by: Richard from: NC
September 24, 2013 3:02 PM
The MB was founded by an Egyptian cleric in the 1920's with a view towards a return to 6th century Islam. On the surface they are more moderate than some groups. However, they have actually been the chief financier of arms used by many terrorist organizations, saying one thing to their supporters but doing another. The press has not reported their activities. Kosovo, for example, was about 90% Christian a decade or two before the war there. The supplied weapons and money and the process was to reward people who burned churches or killed Christians until enough left that there was now a Muslim majority. It is little wonder that the Serbs were angered when the facts ignored by the Western press are brought to light. No, the world would be a better place without the MB.


by: Sarmad from: Canada
September 24, 2013 2:45 PM
How come you quote some residents to give an image that the group is a terrorist group? Who are these residents that you are quoting and why should we take their words as truth? And why don't you quote the other residents with the opposite views? Whatever happened to professional journalism?

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